Jessica Chastain calls out Quentin Tarantino over Uma Thurman stunt accident

Jessica Chastain has called out Quentin Tarantino after actress Uma Thurman revealed he allegedly pressured her into driving an unsafe car on the set of Kill Bill in 2003. In an interview with the New York Times published on Saturday (03Feb18), the 47…

Jessica Chastain has called out Quentin Tarantino after actress Uma Thurman revealed he allegedly pressured her into driving an unsafe car on the set of Kill Bill in 2003.

In an interview with the New York Times published on Saturday (03Feb18), the 47-year-old explained how she was made to perform a life-threatening stunt on set in Mexico. After she was informed by a crew member that her the gearstick wasn’t working properly, Thurman was adamant she wasn’t going to do the stunt, but Tarantino did not want to take no for an answer.

“Quentin came in my trailer and didn’t like to hear no, like any director,” she explained. “He was furious because I’d cost them a lot of time. But I was scared. He said: ‘I promise you the car is fine. It’s a straight piece of road. Hit 40 miles per hour or your hair won’t blow the right way and I’ll make you do it again.’ But that was a deathbox that I was in. The seat wasn’t screwed down properly. It was a sand road and it was not a straight road.”

Uma went on to reveal the stunt went awry and she ended up having to go to the hospital for a concussion and permanently damaged knees. Video from the accident has now been released after 15 years and Chastain is slamming the filmmaker for putting Uma in danger. She is also calling him out over accusations Thurman made, claiming he spit on her and choked her with a chain for scenes in the movies.

“I keep imagining Tarantino spitting in Uma’s face and strangling her with a chain for KILL BILL,” Chastain writes on Twitter. “How many images of women in media do we celebrate that showcase abuse? When did this become normalized ‘entertainment’?”

“When violence against women is used as a plot device to make the characters stronger then we have a problem,” she continues. “It is not empowering to be beaten and raped, yet so many films make it their ‘pheonix’ (sic) moment for women. We don’t need abuse in order to be powerful. We already are.”

“Directors inserting themselves into a scene depicting abuse is crossing a boundary,” she adds. “How can an actor feel safe when your director is strangling you?”

Tarantino has not commented on Uma’s claims.

© Cover Media

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