Robyn Lawley alleges Victoria’s Secret models ‘starve’ themselves

Robyn Lawley has alleged her Victoria’s Secret model friends “starve themselves”.The curvy Australian model, a vocal advocate for body positivity in the fashion world, has often expressed her outrage over executives at the U.S. lingerie brand failing t…

Robyn Lawley has alleged her Victoria’s Secret model friends “starve themselves”.

The curvy Australian model, a vocal advocate for body positivity in the fashion world, has often expressed her outrage over executives at the U.S. lingerie brand failing to feature a diverse range of body types in the annual Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, with the latest catwalk extravaganza taking place in New York earlier this month (Nov18).

Now, Robyn has criticised bosses at Victoria’s Secret again for seemingly perpetuating myths that models need to be thin and have an athletic silhouette in order to be cast in runway shows.

“I know it from the inside out and it is complete bulls**t,” she said in an interview with Australia’s The Daily Telegraph. “All my friends that were doing that show were starving themselves, they weren’t eating and they were exercising four to five hours a day and they are not usually exercise people.”

Prior to the 2018 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, Robyn started a petition urging consumers to boycott the company over its alleged lack of body diversity and also appeared in an inclusive lingerie show for plus-size fashion retailer Simply Be, alongside models such as Hayley Hasselhoff, Felicity Hayward, and Ashley James.

Accordingly, the brunette beauty cannot understand why bosses at Victoria’s Secret are not open to embracing models of different shapes and sizes.

“(Around) 80 per cent of people who watch that show are women so why wouldn’t you cater to that and show diversity? It just doesn’t make any sense to me financially from a company standpoint but also it takes a company like Victoria’s Secret to change the game,” the 29-year-old commented.

In addition to criticism for failing to keep up with consumer desire for body positive underwear, Ed Razek, chief marketing officer at Victoria’s Secret, came under fire days after the brand’s annual show following comments he made in an interview with U.S. Vogue in which he insisted he had considered casting transgender and plus-sized models in the latest spectacle but decided against doing so because the company “did not market to the whole world”. He later apologised on social media for coming across as “insensitive”.

And while Robyn is “technically too tall to model” at 6ft 2 (1.88m), she is determined to make it her mission to prove that inclusivity is the way of the future.

“I think diversity is a really amazing goal for any fashion brand to aspire to,” she smiled.

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