Eva Green ‘blessed’ to work with Tim Burton on third movie

Eva Green felt blessed to work with “genius” Tim Burton for a third time on Dumbo.The French actress, who uses her natural accent in the new Disney retelling of the little elephant who can fly, has previously been directed by the double Oscar nominee i…

Eva Green felt blessed to work with “genius” Tim Burton for a third time on Dumbo.

The French actress, who uses her natural accent in the new Disney retelling of the little elephant who can fly, has previously been directed by the double Oscar nominee in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and Dark Shadows.

She joins an all-star cast, including Colin Farrell, Michael Keaton, and Danny DeVito, in the updated Dumbo, and told reporters at the recent London premiere why she keeps coming back to Tim’s projects.

“I feel very blessed that this is the third time working with him. He’s a total genius full stop,” Eva said to Cover Media. “And then a wonderful man. He’s very humble; he’s full of heart, so it’s a real, real pleasure to work with this man.

“It’s a real honour working with such a genius, he understands the heart of outsiders. His movies are always very moving.”

She also touched on why the Edward Scissorhands director was the perfect fit for Disney’s latest live-action flick, which, unlike the 1941 original, focuses more on Dumbo’s relationship with the humans around him.

“Dumbo is a perfect Tim Burton theme; the unloved creature, different, he goes through a journey and finds himself and learns how to celebrate his peculiarity,” the 38-year-old smiled. “It’s just a very beautiful message. We live in a crazy world where people are told to look a certain way to be loved, it just says be authentic, be yourself and it’s alright – it makes you special.”

Dumbo is in cinemas now.

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Jordan Peele was determined for Us to be a ‘monster’ movie

Jordan Peele knew from the outset that Us would be a “monster” movie.The new psychological horror film, written and directed by the Get Out helmer, stars Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, with the story following a family who are confronted by a g…

Jordan Peele knew from the outset that Us would be a “monster” movie.

The new psychological horror film, written and directed by the Get Out helmer, stars Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, with the story following a family who are confronted by a group of doppelgangers.

Speaking about the doppelgangers, especially the double of Lupita’s character Adelaide Wilson, Jordan has now shared that he wanted not only to create a character, but also a monster that would be on the same level as horror film icons Freddy Krueger or Jason Voorhees.

“That was the goal from early on,” he said in a video interview for Collider.com. “I wanted to make a monster movie. I think part of it is, you know, when you see a charismatic and well-designed monster, it is magnetic and in the tradition of monster stories I think, empathy lies underneath it.”

Jordan went on to explain that he had been intrigued by the idea of a doppelganger from a young age, though he confessed to spending a lot of time down a “rabbit hole” investigating the concept while working on the script.

“I tried to get to the bottom of why doppelgangers (are) fairly universal. Just about every mythology has some version of the doppelganger tale. And there tends to be a harrowing menace attached to the mythologies as well. I did some research,” the 40-year-old smiled.

Elsewhere in the chat, Jordan explained that he gave his set production designer Ruth De Jong and her team permission to include “Easter eggs” for viewers wherever possible.

And on the topic of whether he plans to continue to make a shared universe of horror movies, following on from Us and his acclaimed 2017 movie Get Out, the star remained tight-lipped.

“Yes, I have thought of it. (I’ll) save it (for now),” he laughed.

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Jason Clarke relieved Stephen King approves of Pet Sematary remake

Jason Clarke was relieved to learn that author Stephen King approved of the Pet Sematary remake.King’s 1983 horror novel was first adapted for the big screen in 1989, and it has now undergone the remake treatment, with the Australian actor playing Dr. …

Jason Clarke was relieved to learn that author Stephen King approved of the Pet Sematary remake.

King’s 1983 horror novel was first adapted for the big screen in 1989, and it has now undergone the remake treatment, with the Australian actor playing Dr. Louis Creed, who moves to a new home with his family and discovers a mysterious burial ground hidden in the woods behind it.

In a new interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Jason said he felt relieved to read emails in which the renowned horror writer gave his seal of approval, given that King didn’t hold back in voicing his issues with Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation of his 1977 novel The Shining.

“Of course, yeah. I like The Shining, and I’m sure Stephen appreciates that movie in some way. In the emails that I’ve seen, King understands that his work has to be interpreted,” Jason explained. “There’s no way just to do a straight adaptation of his book. The directors had to make it their own, which I think they’ve done. It’s wonderful to have that dialogue. It must be great for him to see his books be interpreted still, 30-40 years after they’ve been written.”

The First Man actor read the novel in his teens and was scared by it. Although he was a fan of the source material, Jason had to leave that behind and surrender to the script and his directors, Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer, when it came to the shoot.

“You have to shoot the film in the end; the script is what you’re shooting. It’s easy to make that mistake as an actor: to try and do the source material,” he continued. “If it’s not gonna work for the story that’s going to be told in the cinema, it’s gonna kind of run into a brick wall. So, that’s the director’s job — to guide you.”

However, he recalled a moment when he improvised a line which was inspired by a different character’s piece of dialogue in the novel.

“By understanding the source material, you find ways to bring out more of the book, when you can, while still shooting the script,” he added.

Pet Sematary, which also stars John Lithgow and Amy Seimitz, is due for release in April (19).

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Ralph Fiennes doesn’t like shouting at actors on set

Ralph Fiennes has adopted a persuasive attitude as a director.The English Patient star recently stepped behind the camera for the third time, for The White Crow, a biopic of Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev.Although the 56-year-old admits he often i…

Ralph Fiennes has adopted a persuasive attitude as a director.

The English Patient star recently stepped behind the camera for the third time, for The White Crow, a biopic of Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev.

Although the 56-year-old admits he often insists actors stick to his vision, the mild-mannered star likes to gently urge rather than shout and scream.

“I know I’m quite vocal,” he tells British magazine Reader’s Digest. “I sometimes have to say, ‘No it has to be like this’. But I think the thing to say, ‘Yes, that’s interesting but what happens if we go here? One of the basic things about directing is not to close a door. You don’t want to close down the confidence of an actor who’s exploring and that’s really important.”

Ralph has modelled his softly spoken style on his English Patient director, the late Anthony Minghella – whom he credits with allowing him to open up as an actor.

“Anthony Minghella had a very particular, gentle, probing style,” he explains. “I think he genuinely wanted to see what an actor could reveal for him, and bring to a line or moment.”

Another inspiration was his writer mother Jennifer’s attitude to his decision to go into acting – one she fully supported when he told her while studying at London’s Chelsea College of Art.

He adds: “The art school atmosphere was designed to push you to be inquisitive and curious and something about it gave me the confidence to say, ‘This is what I need to do’. Once I said that to my mother, it was as if she’d been waiting for me to say it. She was completely behind it.”

The White Crow is in cinemas now.

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Laura Mulleavy talks enduring influence of cinema on Rodarte’s designs

Rodarte designer Laura Mulleavy credits Hollywood’s influence as shaping her as a designer.The California-based fashion star, who co-founded and runs the label with her sister Kate Mulleavy, is big on movies, which she is certain is down to her life gr…

Rodarte designer Laura Mulleavy credits Hollywood’s influence as shaping her as a designer.

The California-based fashion star, who co-founded and runs the label with her sister Kate Mulleavy, is big on movies, which she is certain is down to her life growing up just next to Tinseltown.

She and Kate once considered moving their brand to America’s fashion capital, New York, but U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour convinced them to stay put.

“Overall, I think there’s always been a strong fashion community in Los Angeles; it’s just been through a different lens,” Laura told The Hollywood Reporter. “We have (James) Galanos and Rudi Gernreich and Bob Mackie, and then you have the history of Hollywood costume design, which is so profound on fashion in general. I always looked to film as something that really affected my view of design and my aesthetic.”

As for which films had a lasting impact on Laura, she insisted that the work of horror director Alfred Hitchcock comes out on top. It was the designer’s mother who introduced her to cinema at a young age, and she has been enthralled with it ever since.

“Hitchcock was a big part of my understanding of fashion design and Hollywood,” she explained. “Vertigo was shot at places I used to go to and I know the areas in San Francisco where The Birds (was shot).

“It’s the same thing in L.A. The street corner in Pasadena is Michael Myers’ house (from Halloween). You know the city through these locations in cinema. Because we responded so much to the visual styling of film, fashion just became a part of what Los Angeles is to us. When you see incredible costumes in a film, it’s a very powerful thing that you never get out of your head.”

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