Gigi Hadid’s Instagram photo lawsuit battle dismissed

A judge has granted Gigi Hadid’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit with a paparazzi agency over an Instagram photo. The model was accused of illegally profiting from the work of photographers at Xclusive-Lee, Inc. last year, but according to editors at Peop…

A judge has granted Gigi Hadid’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit with a paparazzi agency over an Instagram photo.

The model was accused of illegally profiting from the work of photographers at Xclusive-Lee, Inc. last year, but according to editors at People, the suit has been dropped.

U.S. District Judge Pamela Chen in Los Angeles reportedly sided with Hadid’s legal team and dismissed the case after the 24-year-old was accused of featuring images of herself on social media without permission.

She ruled that the independent photo agency company – that owned the photo of Hadid – could not sue for direct copyright infringement because it failed to demonstrate that “the defendant has actually copied the plaintiff’s work.”

Hadid’s legal representatives previously described the lawsuit as nothing more than an effort to extract money from her when the catwalk star was threatened with legal action in October after she shared a paparazzi photo of herself on Instagram.

The snap showed Hadid wearing a denim blazer and matching shorts, with silver high heels and a bag.

Bosses at Xclusive-Lee, Inc. subsequently sued her in January for failing to license the image from them or get their permission. They alleged that approximately 1.6 million people commented on or liked the model’s photo within four days after Hadid posted it on Instagram.

The firm was seeking damages for copyright infringement and any profits gained from the image, which was later removed from the social media site.

John Quinn, the attorney representing Hadid in the case, told People on Thursday that he was pleased the court “recognised this case for what it was – an effort to extract a settlement from Ms. Hadid with little regard for the basic requirements of copyright law.”

The case is now officially closed.

© Cover Media