Natalie Portman reflects on ‘ephemeral’ nature of beauty

Natalie Portman works hard on various projects because she knows beauty is “ephemeral”.The Oscar winner is considered to be one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood and has been the face of French fashion house Dior since 2010. However, Natalie ha…

Natalie Portman works hard on various projects because she knows beauty is “ephemeral”.

The Oscar winner is considered to be one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood and has been the face of French fashion house Dior since 2010.

However, Natalie has now shared in an interview with Harper’s Bazaar U.K. that she finds it frustrating whenever she’s judged only on her looks.

“As a woman, you are constantly fighting against only being valued for your looks, because it becomes a very tenuous thing, to be defined by the gaze of others, the opinion of others,” the 38-year-old commented. “And beauty is, by definition, ephemeral, it’s a thing that you can’t trap in time, it’s a butterfly, it lives for a second. So to make a lifetime worthwhile and have meaning cannot rest on beauty…”

In spite of her stance, Natalie did emphasise that while she’s aware of political and social unrest across the world, she takes comfort in focusing on herself from time to time, to escape the world around her. One way she does this is by dressing up in beautiful clothes.

“I love beauty and I love glamour, and they can be part of the sweetness of life in the face of really dark things – and that has great worth,” the mother-of-two shared.

Elsewhere in the interview, Natalie revealed that she is hugely impressed with the work Maria Grazia Chiuri is doing at Dior, having been tapped as the luxury label’s first female artistic director in 2016.

“It’s wonderful to have a woman designing for other women, someone who understands us, and knows that maybe we might want to wear a T-shirt with a skirt and flats, or have pockets in our dresses,” Natalie gushed, before adding that the designer’s comfortable creations are almost political. “If a woman can’t breathe in her dress, what does that mean? It’s the most literal symbol of oppression that you could possibly have – it’s so political.”

© Cover Media