Roland Mouret launching sustainable bridal collection

French designer Roland Mouret is launching a sustainable bridal collection.The fashion star founded his eponymous label in 1998 and had his major breakthrough in 2005 with his Galaxy dress, which was worn by a bunch of celebrities including Victoria Be…

French designer Roland Mouret is launching a sustainable bridal collection.

The fashion star founded his eponymous label in 1998 and had his major breakthrough in 2005 with his Galaxy dress, which was worn by a bunch of celebrities including Victoria Beckham, Halle Berry, Cameron Diaz, and Rachel Weisz.

Mouret, who has designed custom-made wedding dresses for clients in the past, is now launching his first official bridal collection, with the line consisting of multi-faceted pieces that can be worn again after the big day.

“The amount of fabric used for a bridal dress that you’re only going to wear once is a waste of material and a waste of space because you have to immediately pack it away,” he explained to Marie Claire.

His spring 2020 bridal collection will incorporate pieces that can be worn in normal daily life, from blazers, jumpsuits, and trousers to ankle-length skirts, as well as simple white dresses.

“My generation of designers went from two collections to four to six collections,” Mouret explained about his desire to be sustainable. “When you wake up and realise your creativity is destroying the planet…it’s quite a bitter feeling. But back then, we didn’t know any other way.”

In a bid to tackle the fashion industry’s problem with waste, Mouret, who also boasts Meghan, Duchess of Sussex as a celebrity fan, has designed the BLUE hanger with Dutch company Arch & Hook. He hopes the product, which is made from a mixture of plastic and other ocean debris, will replace the single-use plastic hangers used solely for transporting clothing from the factory to the retailer.

He will soon fly to Los Angeles to meet with members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and other leaders to discuss the product and call for changes to the industry.

“I know what’s in store for the future and I know what’s happening. I think we’re in an emergency, so this project makes me happy and sad at the same time,” he added.

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