Jeremy Scott has filmmaking ambitions

Jeremy Scott could soon be doing a Tom Ford and stepping behind the camera to direct a movie.The Moschino head shared his filmmaking dreams in a chat with The Hollywood Reporter after unveiling a new line influenced by monster movies.Asked if he had an…

Jeremy Scott could soon be doing a Tom Ford and stepping behind the camera to direct a movie.

The Moschino head shared his filmmaking dreams in a chat with The Hollywood Reporter after unveiling a new line influenced by monster movies.

Asked if he had any ambitions to become a director after he worked closely with Universal on his horror-imbued line, he exclaimed: “I would love to! We are in Hollywood, aren’t we?”

Revealing the idea for his latest Moschino collection came about after he went on a private Universal Studios tour at the Hollywood theme park, Jeremy decided to pay homage to some of Universal’s most memorable monster movies, like Frankenstein, Dracula, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon. He also drew on films like King Kong, modern horror Scream, and ’80s classic The Shining.

Items from the 2020 men’s and women’s line include a Casper the Friendly Ghost T-shirt, jeans printed with Frankenstein stitches, a Dracula cape, a white tulle dress reminiscent of an Egyptian mummy’s bandages and a pleated white dress teamed with an oversized black gorilla hand which doubles as a cape.

“I love all these different types of horror in Hollywood cinema; I eat it all up!” Jeremy said, adding how the idea first came to him.

“I saw this idyllic, beautiful street (at Universal Studios) and it inspired me. I thought, ‘Something sinister’s going to happen here’ and I started designing the collection. And that’s when I started going around the Halloween theme. Frankenstein, Dracula, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon all originated here at Universal so I wanted to do an homage to them. A little spooky couture! And I thought about kids trick-or-treating. Some things are more sinister, some are more playful. That’s the thing about Halloween. Everything goes!”

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Humberto Leon and Carol Lim departing Kenzo

Creative directors Humberto Leon and Carol Lim are leaving Kenzo.After eight years at the helm, the design duo will present their final collection for the French luxury fashion house on 23 June during Paris Fashion Week: Men’s, WWD reports. They will …

Creative directors Humberto Leon and Carol Lim are leaving Kenzo.

After eight years at the helm, the design duo will present their final collection for the French luxury fashion house on 23 June during Paris Fashion Week: Men’s, WWD reports.

They will officially depart the label on 1 July to focus on their U.S.-based Opening Ceremony store chain and fashion label, with their successor to be named at a later date.

Sylvie Colin, chief executive officer of Kenzo, paid tribute to the pair for modernising the contemporary brand, while building a close relationship with its 80-year-old founder, Kenzo Takada.

“Humberto and Carol consistently brought diversity and inclusion to the forefront at Kenzo, using their collections, fashion shows, advertising, and special projects to engage and galvanise a new generation of creative,” she said in a statement. “They have always approached everything they do through the lens of customer experience and pioneered a modern vision of what it is to be a creative director.”

During their tenure at Kenzo, which is preparing to celebrate its 50th anniversary next year, Leon and Lim launched collaborations with brands including shoe giant Vans and H&M.

The pair’s departure comes at the end of a period of creative upheaval at Kenzo’s parent company, LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton, which in the last 18 months has seen the arrival of new designers at Celine and the menswear divisions of Louis Vuitton and Dior.

Leon and Lim’s final co-ed show, to be staged at the AccorHotels Arena in the French capital, is expected to be a celebratory, star-studded affair that will gather some of their closest associates.

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Donatella Versace dedicating menswear presentation to The Prodigy’s Keith Flint

Donatella Versace is dedicating her upcoming Milan Fashion Week menswear show to her late friend, The Prodigy frontman Keith Flint. The 64-year-old designer, who has run the Italian luxury fashion house since the tragic death of her brother Gianni Ver…

Donatella Versace is dedicating her upcoming Milan Fashion Week menswear show to her late friend, The Prodigy frontman Keith Flint.

The 64-year-old designer, who has run the Italian luxury fashion house since the tragic death of her brother Gianni Versace in 1997, will present her latest menswear collection at Milan Fashion Week: Men’s on Saturday.

In an interview with WWD ahead of the presentation, Donatella revealed that the show will be dedicated to her good friend Flint, who passed away in March at the age of 49.

“This show is dedicated to my great friend Keith Flint of The Prodigy, who passed away this year. We have been close friends, the first time he did a concert for a fashion audience was with me,” she said. “He played during the MTV Awards and then he came to Milan and he did a performance at the men’s show in Via Gesu, where we are going to show this season.

“He created raving, everything started with him. And these kinds of things are ideological and cultural disruptions, which are extremely important. Keith was not expecting the world of fashion to listen to his music, but I called him, and I told him that I deeply loved this song called Firestarter. I really feel I’m a fire starter.”

The designer explained that the models will hit the runway to the sound of The Prodigy’s 1996 hit Firestarter, which will serve as the main soundtrack to the show.

In the early 2000s, fashion reporters questioned whether Flint was Versace’s new muse. In 2004, he escorted her to the amfAR gala in Cannes, France and took to the stage to perform between the Versace and Versus menswear presentations with his band.

Milan Fashion Week: Men’s runs from Friday to Monday and features presentations from the likes of Fendi, Giorgio Armani, and Philipp Plein.

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Carolina Herrera accused of appropriating Mexican culture

Carolina Herrera is under fire for allegedly appropriating Mexican culture in its resort 2020 collection.The luxury brand, founded by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980 and currently run by creative director Wes Gordon, unveiled the latest line – …

Carolina Herrera is under fire for allegedly appropriating Mexican culture in its resort 2020 collection.

The luxury brand, founded by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980 and currently run by creative director Wes Gordon, unveiled the latest line – titled Latin Holiday – earlier this month, with the range including embroidered dresses, vibrant floral prints, sharply tailored suits and logo T-shirts.

However, Mexico’s culture secretary Alejandra Frausto has taken issue with a number of the garments, claiming in a letter sent to Spanish language newspaper El Pais that patterns in some items were unique to indigenous people in the nation.

Specifically, Frausto noted two black dresses with embroidered flowers resembled clothing made by artisans from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, while another long white dress had needlework similar to what is produced by people in the community of Tenango de Doria in Hidalgo. Another dress appears to have been inspired by a sarape, or colourful blanket-like shawl, from Saltillo.

In addition, senator Susana Harp criticised the brand in a video posted on Twitter.

“For many years we have been trying to stop big brands and designers, who, in this disrespectful manner, take elements of indigenous cultures without approaching the communities or working with them,” she said, before going on to question whether the indigenous people would benefit from the sale of the collection in any way.

Responding to the criticism, a Carolina Herrera spokesperson issued a statement in which they insisted the designers recognised the “wonderful and diverse craft and textile work of Mexican artisans” and noted that the collection is inspired “by the culture’s rich colours and artisanal techniques”.

While in a string of Instagram posts displaying snaps of the designs, Gordon explained the line took on the “playful and colourful mood of a Latin holiday”.

“Inspired by the House spirit of alegria de vivir that is synonymous with the resort season, this collection is about visceral reactions of delight – eclectic patterns, unexpected silhouettes, pulsating energy. This is my favourite collection that I have ever been a part of, and I am so grateful to my amazing design team and the brilliant patternmakers and seamstresses who tirelessly brought it to life,” he wrote.

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Pierpaolo Piccioli: ‘Streetwear and couture can happily cohabit’

Pierpaolo Piccioli has opened up about his unique streetwear collaboration with Jun Takahashi.The Valentino creative director has teamed up with the Japanese fashion designer, who created the Undercover label, in a series of collections, culminating in…

Pierpaolo Piccioli has opened up about his unique streetwear collaboration with Jun Takahashi.

The Valentino creative director has teamed up with the Japanese fashion designer, who created the Undercover label, in a series of collections, culminating in a line that was inspired by Edgar Allan Poe.

“I wanted to narrate a cultural phenomenon that involves our perception of beauty and the way in which people today are not as constrained by codes, styles, and languages,” Piccioli told InStyle magazine of the line, which debuted on the catwalk in March. “Streetwear and couture can happily cohabit.”

Takahashi first worked with Piccioli back in November and was among several artists who created items for Valentino’s pre-fall show in Tokyo. Since then, the Italian has featured a substantial number of Takahashi’s prints in both his fall men’s and women’s collections.

While it may seem like an unusual collaboration, Takahashi described their work together as “searching for the common beauty in each other’s work”.

“Long silence, eye contact, shy smile, then drawing,” Piccioli said of their design process. “The sound comes from the pencil, I guess. We do not speak that loud.”

For Valentino’s fall/winter 2019 men’s show, Takahashi paid tribute to American writer and poet Poe with images splashed across Piccioli’s tailored outerwear, knits, and a hoodie. For the women’s collection, the designer used an image of a classical sculpture of a couple embracing and added roses and chains.

And Piccioli isn’t ruling out working with Takahashi again in the future.

“The thing that interests me the most about collaborating with a designer like Jun is not the technical creative process in itself but the human exchange and, in our case, the cultural dialogue,” the designer shared.

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Peter Dundas: ‘My brand is a happy one’

Peter Dundas’ sole aim for his namesake label is to be known as a happy brand.Norwegian designer Dundas launched his eponymous fashion house two years ago with a bang – creating Beyonce’s custom looks at the 2017 Grammy Awards.Explaining his design phi…

Peter Dundas’ sole aim for his namesake label is to be known as a happy brand.

Norwegian designer Dundas launched his eponymous fashion house two years ago with a bang – creating Beyonce’s custom looks at the 2017 Grammy Awards.

Explaining his design philosophy, the former Roberto Cavalli head told WWD that he’s all about fun.

“There are different ways of communicating with the media nowadays. It’s not checking in with fashion weeks for years and years anymore,” he mused.

“There are designers who express intellect, art and sometimes sadness through fashion, but I want the Dundas brand to be a happy brand. And I want my woman to feel that way with her life, too.”

Evangelo Bousis, his business and life partner, echoed Dundas’ sentiments, and added that the brand is multifaceted.

“Dundas is not just a red carpet brand. There are so many layers to Dundas. We do lots of leather, and we do daywear, too. In our mind, we are a lifestyle brand and a Dundas woman has many faces,” he stated.

Earlier this month, Dundas, who also served as the artistic director of Emilio Pucci, unveiled the new D6 collection, which was inspired by the animals and nature of Africa.

Explaining why he took his cue from wild animals, especially big cats, he shared: “When I was launching the brand, I didn’t know what to put, so I put elements of a black panther into it. Now, every collection has a bit of black panther in it.”

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Pat McGrath launches foundation line

Pat McGrath has launched a foundation range comprising of 36 shades. Following 25 years of field research, six years of product development and cryptic Instagram teasers, the 49-year-old legendary make-up artist has announced the debut of her Pat McGr…

Pat McGrath has launched a foundation range comprising of 36 shades.

Following 25 years of field research, six years of product development and cryptic Instagram teasers, the 49-year-old legendary make-up artist has announced the debut of her Pat McGrath Labs Sublime Perfection Foundation.

The 36-shade range, which McGrath describes as having a light-to-medium, but buildable, finish, is part of the brand’s new complexion collection, dubbed Skin Fetish: Sublime Perfection the System.

In addition to the foundation, which will retail for $68 (£54), the line also includes a universal one-shade primer, five different shades of setting powder, a foundation brush, and a powder brush.

Joining the other brands who have either expanded their foundation shade ranges or introduced new, inclusive complexion lines, including Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty, the British make-up artist wanted her new collection to be fully inclusive.

“I just remember as almost a child shopping in department stores and seeing all of these beautiful colours and then they never worked on my skin, or they were too bruise-y on pale skin,” she previously told Fashionista.

She also revealed that “there’s so much study that goes into every formula, scientifically” to make sure the products will work on many different skin tones.

For Sublime Perfection, the 36 shades span five different levels – Light, Light Medium, Medium, Medium Deep and Deep – as it was important to McGrath that there was an even distribution amongst the tones.

The Sublime Perfection line will be available from 26 July at PatMcGrath.com, Sephora.com, Selfridges.com and select Selfridges stores.

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Shanina Shaik uses luxury bamboo brush to blend her make-up

Shanina Shaik swears a luxury bamboo brush is the secret to achieving flawless make-up.The Australian model continues to be one of the most sought-after names in the fashion industry, having walked the runway for the likes of Victoria’s Secret, Philipp…

Shanina Shaik swears a luxury bamboo brush is the secret to achieving flawless make-up.

The Australian model continues to be one of the most sought-after names in the fashion industry, having walked the runway for the likes of Victoria’s Secret, Philipp Plein, and Alberta Ferretti.

Now, Shanina has divulged some of her best beauty tips in a tutorial for Vogue.com, including the way she uses a special blending tool.

“This brush, I love. It’s a bamboo brush and it’s by my favourite make-up artist, one of my favourites, Rae Morris. And she created these brushes,” she said, demonstrating how she uses the tool – which is priced from $102.95 (£78.30) – to work in her Charlotte Tilbury Magic Away Concealer and a few drops of foundation into her complexion.

“She actually went to Japan and had these done, and what I love about it is (that) it’s a blender, so it gets every nook and cranny on your face. I actually don’t use a beauty blender, I use this.”

Shanina is a fan of Rae Morris’ Invisible Mattifier and Charlotte Tilbury’s Hollywood Flawless Filter foundation too, and always carries several different shades of concealer in her cosmetics kit because her “skin colour changes all the time”.

The brunette star will dot the product to conceal blemishes or undereye circles as well, admitting she has learned to care for her skin after suffering breakouts as a teenager.

“My mum and my grandmother have really good skin. But I witnessed by grandmother moisturising her skin day and night without fail, so I pretty much copied her, thought it was good. When I was a teenager, I had really oily skin. So, my skin was breaking out so much,” the 28-year-old recalled. “It was really bad, and I was modelling and it didn’t help my self-esteem with bad skin. I think that’s why I love learning about the skin and skincare regimes.

“You can map your skin. I’m breaking out here (lower cheeks), that means it’s hormonal breakouts, so you know what time of the month it is for me. And then here (forehead) is where you’ve been eating a lot or maybe alcohol and diet.”

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Nike drops ’80s-inspired Stranger Things capsule collection

Nike has released an ’80s-inspired Stranger Things collection ahead of the Netflix show’s third season. After dropping hints on Twitter and Instagram, the sportswear giant has announced a collaboration with the hit sci-fi series, which is set in 1985….

Nike has released an ’80s-inspired Stranger Things collection ahead of the Netflix show’s third season.

After dropping hints on Twitter and Instagram, the sportswear giant has announced a collaboration with the hit sci-fi series, which is set in 1985.

The collaboration will unfold with two release dates – one dropping on 27 June and the second round debuting on 1 July, just three days before the third season of the show, starring Millie Bobby Brown, will be released on Netflix.

The first launch will not only play homage to the Stranger Things’ fictional school – Hawkins High – but also to some of Nike’s most popular sneaker styles that launched in the ’80s, including Nike Air Force 1, Nike Dunk, Nike Air Max 1 and the Nike Tech Challenge II.

The first collection pays tribute to the fictional school by incorporating green and orange colour schemes and its Tiger mascot into a mix of sweatsuits and three pairs of sneakers.

According to Nike, the clothes will channel the physical education uniforms of the 1980s, and will feature a reworking of the iconic Cortez, Blazer and Tailwind shoes.

Next up is the OG Pack, which will be released on 1 July, and will incorporate a red, white and blue colour scheme to celebrate Independence Day – held in the U.S. on 4 July – and include a year marker on the heel as well as fireworks printed on the insole.

The @nikestore account on Twitter teased the collab in a cryptic message that highlighted the timeframe of the series – 6 June, 1985.

The caption on the post read: “We (Nike) acknowledge that several shipments from 1985 have gone missing. Please call 1.800.561.1985 with any info.”

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Cindy Crawford fighting ageism by appearing in nude photoshoots

Cindy Crawford wants to show women in their fifties there is “still beauty” in getting older. The fashion icon, along with her supermodel friend Christy Turlington, has now opened up about how she feels it’s important to do photoshoots, including nud…

Cindy Crawford wants to show women in their fifties there is “still beauty” in getting older.

The fashion icon, along with her supermodel friend Christy Turlington, has now opened up about how she feels it’s important to do photoshoots, including nude pictures, as means of proving to society that women are beautiful no matter what their age.

“We want to show women who are 53, and I think Christy just turned 50, that there’s still beauty in that,” she told WWD, before revealing that she was happy with the “tasteful nudes” she recently did for famed photographer Russell James’ book, Angels.

However, Cindy recalled an incident in which she had to respond to an online troll who criticised the sultry shots.

“I remember some snarky person on Instagram – there seem to be a lot of those – posted something like, ‘Ah, why are you still doing those at your age?’ And I was like, is there an age where being nude isn’t beautiful? It’s just a different kind of beauty,” the model explained, but did admit it is a “little harder” to get herself motivated for nude photoshoots and joked that she needed Viagra to perk herself up. “I hope this is politically correct, but sometimes I say I need Viagra for shoots. It’s harder to get it up.”

And Cindy noted the importance of women indulging in self-care and treating themselves as kindly as they would their friends: “That is part of the reason I still do shoots.”

The mother-of-two touched upon her beauty secrets too, and championed the beauty of confidence, along with her skincare line, Meaningful Beauty.

“Using it daily along with avoiding the sun, not smoking, drinking a lot of water, and getting enough sleep is key to looking and feeling good at any age,” she shared.

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