Viktor & Rolf delve into ’emotional rollercoaster’ of current Covid times for couture show

Viktor & Rolf proved couture can perfectly reflect current times with its fall/winter 20 collection.Shown digitally this Paris Couture Week season, owing to the Covid-19 pandemic, designers Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren presented nine looks, broken …

Viktor & Rolf proved couture can perfectly reflect current times with its fall/winter 20 collection.

Shown digitally this Paris Couture Week season, owing to the Covid-19 pandemic, designers Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren presented nine looks, broken up into three groups of three similar designs; a satin dress in the style of a night gown, a wrap dress which looks like a super chic dressing gown, and a high-fashion overcoat.

In a video narrated by singer Mika, which was shot in the Waldorf Astoria in Amsterdam, titled change, viewers were treated to a masterful fashion extravaganza.

The first three looks, which reflect “a rather sombre mood… a feeling of sadness and anger, familiar to many these days” said Mika, comprised of blue satin empire cut dress decorated with rain clouds, a grey chenille wrap gown with sumptuous black quilted detailing and a billowing faux leather coat covered in giant spikes.

Next were the dresses that represent the confusion at this strange time in history; a pink satin number featuring large face emojis, a fuzzy pink dressing gown with canary yellow touches and giant bows down one arm and another overblown jacket, this time switched from black to pink and the spikes replaced with colourful cylinders poking out.

Finally, closing the show was the dreamy love and hope section, made up of a white satin dress with a simple heart motif, a white short-sleeved quilted and belted robe featuring giant love hearts over each pocket, and a wide trench-style coat adorned with pink and red hearts running from the shoulders to the hem.

“The subject is the emotional rollercoaster that we all experienced and are experiencing,” Snoeren said, reports WWD. “We are discussing a little bit mental health and how to dress for your emotions, as well to say that all emotions are valid and necessary.”

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Dolce & Gabbana pay tribute to “brilliant” Ennio Morricone

Dolce & Gabbana designers have paid tribute to frequent collaborator Ennio Morricone, who passed away on Monday.The composer was well known for his work in film, especially on Sergio Leone’s spaghetti Westerns, like The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and A…

Dolce & Gabbana designers have paid tribute to frequent collaborator Ennio Morricone, who passed away on Monday.

The composer was well known for his work in film, especially on Sergio Leone’s spaghetti Westerns, like The Good, the Bad and the Ugly and A Fistful of Dollars. Morricone’s more recent work on Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight won the late musician his first Oscar. He died at the age of 91 in his home city of Rome after suffering a fall the previous week.

Dolce & Gabbana designers Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have now shared that he was also well versed in creating scores for fashion shoots, with the Italian designers adding their voices to the many tributes celebrating the highly respected composer.

“Ennio Morricone, the brilliant interpreter of Italian beauty, composed magnificent soundtracks for Dolce&Gabbana that will remain in our hearts forever. Grazie Maestro! Domenico and Stefano,” they wrote on their brand’s Instagram page.

Above the English translation, they penned their tribute in Italian.

The duo also uploaded three fashion shorts that Morricone had scored with his rousing music, including a perfume advert for Dolce Rosa Excelsa starring Sophia Loren from 2016.

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Naomi Campbell bares all in unpublished Valentino pics

Naomi Campbell rode the New York subway completely naked – all in the name of fashion.The legendary supermodel proved once again she’s still got what it takes by releasing unpublished shots from her Valentino pre-fall 2019 accessories campaign.In t…

Naomi Campbell rode the New York subway completely naked – all in the name of fashion.

The legendary supermodel proved once again she’s still got what it takes by releasing unpublished shots from her Valentino pre-fall 2019 accessories campaign.

In the advert imagery, 50-year-old Naomi posed semi-nude with a green sequin cape covering her modesty.

However, Naomi has now shared snaps where the cape came off. In the three photos uploaded to her Instagram, the statuesque star sits on a bank of plastic chairs, stands on the platform as a train approaches and finally sits in an empty carriage, with nothing more than a Valentino bag to cover her body.

“Unpublished pictures @maisonvalentino (two hearts),” she captioned the stunning photos, tagging the high-end label, designer Pierpaolo Piccioli and photography duo Inez and Vinoodh.

Pierpaolo left a simple love heart underneath the post, while Inez and Vinoodh replied with five lip emojis, and later a string of hearts.

Steven Kolb, president and chief executive officer of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, also showed his appreciation, writing, “I love these photos so much (heart),” and celebrity stylist Phillip Bloch commented: “All a girl needs is a big good bag of tricks.”

Valentino head Pierpaolo actually pipped Naomi to the post by sharing the shots on his own Instagram in May to celebrate the model’s big birthday.

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Chanel presents ’80s-inspired couture

Chanel served up punk princess vibes for its new couture collection on Tuesday.Showing on the second day of digital Paris Couture Week, Virginie Viard presented a line full of punky party dresses, reimagined tweed looks and billowing ball gowns. Viard,…

Chanel served up punk princess vibes for its new couture collection on Tuesday.

Showing on the second day of digital Paris Couture Week, Virginie Viard presented a line full of punky party dresses, reimagined tweed looks and billowing ball gowns.

Viard, the successor of Chanel legend Karl Lagerfeld, explained how the late designer was at the forefront of her thoughts when she created the showstopping looks.

“I was thinking about a punk princess coming out of Le Palace at dawn. With a taffeta dress, big hair, feathers and lots of jewellery,” she wrote in the show notes. “This collection is more inspired by Karl Lagerfeld than Gabrielle Chanel. Karl would go to Le Palace, he would accompany these very sophisticated and very dressed up women, who were very eccentric too.”

The 30 designs are a world away from Chanel’s spring couture offerings, which had much sleeker and straighter silhouettes.

“I like working like this, going in the opposite direction of what I did last time. I wanted complexity, sophistication,” she said.

Standout looks from the fall collection include a sumptuous tiered, black, long-sleeved dress worn by Adut Akech which looked straight out of the ’80s, a floor-length dress in an opulent teal hue featuring dramatic sleeves, and a silver scalloped dress with a neat peplum.

“It’s an eccentric girl with a touch of the ’80s. I wanted something joyful,” Viard told WWD. “It makes me think of images I have of (Lagerfeld) with friends before I knew him, when he would often host balls, dinner and parties. People would really dress up.”

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Miranda Kerr: ‘Racism does not have a place in our society’

Miranda Kerr has pledged to support the Black community through her beauty brand KORA Organics.The 37-year-old model launched the line in 2009 with the help of organic chemists, aromatherapists, and formulators from her native Australia.She is now lend…

Miranda Kerr has pledged to support the Black community through her beauty brand KORA Organics.

The 37-year-old model launched the line in 2009 with the help of organic chemists, aromatherapists, and formulators from her native Australia.

She is now lending KORA’s social media platform to Black voices, so they can inspire growth and change in the community.

“This has been an incredibly tumultuous time for our country, and I stand with the Black community and those fighting for equality and justice. As a businesswoman I know it’s my responsibility to take action through KORA, where we stand together in solidarity against racism and injustice,” she told Ocean Drive magazine.

“We will continue to speak up and stand up for one another. As protests have taken place across the U.S. and all over the world, I think many of us have paused and taken time to reflect, educate ourselves and listen to those speaking out. There is no place for racism of any kind in our society and we cannot turn a blind eye when it is so obviously prevalent.”

She added now is the time for people to speak up and show their support, and that she believes everyone is capable of empathy and compassion.

“We are being called to apply those inherent qualities to make a difference for the Black community,” the mother-of-three continued. “The protests have brought the Black Lives Matter movement to the forefront of conversations in a way that has never been so universally embraced. And, my hope is that the actions we are taking now can effect real, meaningful change for the future.”

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Bella Hadid blasts Instagram for removing Palestine reference

Bella Hadid has accused Instagram of bullying after the photo-sharing site removed a picture of her Palestinian-born father Mohamed Hadid’s passport.Model Bella had added the snap to her Instagram Stories, with the words, “My baba and his birthplace of…

Bella Hadid has accused Instagram of bullying after the photo-sharing site removed a picture of her Palestinian-born father Mohamed Hadid’s passport.

Model Bella had added the snap to her Instagram Stories, with the words, “My baba and his birthplace of Palestine”.

Mohamed’s American passport states Palestine as his place of birth.

Later, she updated her 31.4 million followers that Instagram bosses had taken issue with the passport picture.

Sharing a screengrab of the post’s removal, which stated the reason for deleting was because it goes against community guidelines, Bella raged: “A message to me from @instagram… Instagram removed my story that only said ‘My baba And his birthplace of Palestine’ with a photograph of his American passport. @instagram exactly what part of me being proud of my fathers (sic) birth place of Palestine is ‘bullying, harassment , graphic, or sexual nudity?’ Are we not allowed to be Palestinian on Instagram? This, to me, is bullying. You can’t erase history by silencing people. It doesn’t work like that.”

She then reposted the original photo accompanied by a fresh declaration of pride, and asked if they wanted Mohamed to change his birthplace.

“I am proud to be Palestinian (red heart). Everyone should post where their mother and fathers were born today (sic)! Remind them how proud you are of where you come from!” the 23-year-old wrote.

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Erdem Moralioglu shoots campaign for new MatchesFashion capsule

Erdem Moralioglu shot the campaign for his new capsule with MatchesFashion in a garden square across from his London home. As social distancing guidelines and travel restrictions meant the fashion designer couldn’t hire a full crew to create the campa…

Erdem Moralioglu shot the campaign for his new capsule with MatchesFashion in a garden square across from his London home.

As social distancing guidelines and travel restrictions meant the fashion designer couldn’t hire a full crew to create the campaign, he decided to take matters into his own hands and get behind the camera to capture the new summer capsule he designed for the online luxury retailer himself.

With no team, Erdem shot his first fashion campaign with model Maggie Maurer in green space across from his house.

“There was no hair, no make-up and it was such fun,” he told WWD about the experience.

The 13-piece summer capsule, which launched on MatchesFashion.com on Wednesday, is inspired by a Seventies production of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. It features dresses, skirts and tops with plenty of romantic flourishes, with standout pieces including a white belted gown with yellow floral embroidery and a floral embroidered organza gown.

“The play looked so modern, but also so joyous. I love the idea of having these naive florals and something very romantic contrasted with the bright bold colours such as green saturated embroidered dresses. I wanted something that felt easy, but also dreamy,” he said.

Erdem, an avid photographer and photography collector, hasn’t let the coronavirus lockdown stop him from working. In June, he revealed he designed and created his resort 2021 collection at home, using Zoom to keep in touch with employees. Models posed in the pieces in Epping Forest, on the outskirts of the British capital.

“You could either freeze and stop, or think about the future – and design a new collection,” he stated to WWD at the time.

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Naomi Campbell opens Paris Couture Week with powerful speech about diversity

Naomi Campbell opened the first-ever digital Paris Couture Week on Monday by calling on the fashion industry to do more to embrace diversity. In a video message, the supermodel issued a call to action towards industry leaders, urging them to use the m…

Naomi Campbell opened the first-ever digital Paris Couture Week on Monday by calling on the fashion industry to do more to embrace diversity.

In a video message, the supermodel issued a call to action towards industry leaders, urging them to use the momentum of the Black Lives Matter movement to make permanent changes to promote diversity, inclusivity and equality.

“The fight for diversity and for equality has been a long journey in society and in the fashion industry,” the supermodel said while wearing a sleeveless top which read “Phenomenally Black”. “Today, in 2020, we still have a long way to go and the time has come to collectively call the fashion world to task regarding inequality in our workspaces and in our industry.

“It is up to us, it is up to you to start enforcing inclusion of the multitude of identities that compose our countries… It is now more than ever compulsory to include them in a permanent way and not a transient one. It is time to have regular and sustainable conversations with minorities of each countries and cultures, who are already invisible actors of this mega industry.

“It starts now in France. I am Naomi Campbell and I declare Paris Couture Fashion Week ouvert (open). Merci (thank you).”

The first day of Paris Couture Week comprised of digital presentations from Dior, Schiaparelli, Giambattista Valli, featuring Joan Smalls, and Iris Van Herpen, featuring Game of Thrones actress Carice van Houten, among others.

Chanel is among the labels showing on day two.

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Karen Elson wary of forgiving Ryan Adams for ‘terrible behaviour’

Karen Elson is wary of forgiving rocker Ryan Adams for his “terrible behaviour”.The musician was accused of harassment and emotional abuse by multiple women, including ex-wife Mandy Moore and singer Phoebe Bridgers, as part of a New York Times expose.M…

Karen Elson is wary of forgiving rocker Ryan Adams for his “terrible behaviour”.

The musician was accused of harassment and emotional abuse by multiple women, including ex-wife Mandy Moore and singer Phoebe Bridgers, as part of a New York Times expose.

Model and singer Elson also came forward with claims of inappropriate behaviour by Adams, and revealed it was a “traumatizing experience”.

Adams initially claimed the accusations were “upsettingly inaccurate”, but on Friday, he issued a new statement to British newspaper the Daily Mail, in which he formally apologised to those he had hurt.

Elson has since responded to his public statement, and said she would have appreciated a more personal apology.

“I believe in redemption and amends even for him,” the model told her Twitter followers. “However he has not reached out to me since 2018 to apologize for his terrible behavior. In fact back then he called (me) a liar which added more pain and made me disillusioned with the entire music industry.”

“His actions going forward will dictate the sincerity of his statement and if I’m able to forgive,” she added in a follow-up post.

Moore also shared her scepticism at the artist’s intentions behind the tabloid apology, and said she hadn’t heard from her ex-husband.

“Speaking for myself, I’ve not heard from him. I’m not looking for an apology necessarily, but l do find it curious that someone would do an interview about it without actually making amends privately,” she told U.S. breakfast show Today.

In his apology, Adams stated that lockdown had made him reassess his past actions.

“There are no words to express how bad I feel about the ways I’ve mistreated people throughout my life and career,” he said. “All I can say is that I’m sorry. It’s that simple. This period of isolation and reflection made me realize that I needed to make significant changes in my life.”

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Maria Grazia Chiuri: ‘Couture craftsmanship can’t be lost during digital shows’

Maria Grazia Chiuri made sure the craftsmanship of couture wasn’t lost during Dior’s digital Paris Couture Week presentation by creating miniature versions of her designs.Dior was one of the first labels to show at the first-ever digital version of the…

Maria Grazia Chiuri made sure the craftsmanship of couture wasn’t lost during Dior’s digital Paris Couture Week presentation by creating miniature versions of her designs.

Dior was one of the first labels to show at the first-ever digital version of the fashion spectacular, which was forced to move online because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Aware that important aspects of couture could get lost in the move, Chiuri opted to make tiny versions of her latest work, as well as present a film directed by Matteo Garrone. She took inspiration from the Théâtre de la Mode, a 1945 travelling exhibition of miniature collections that promoted French fashion in the aftermath of the Second World War.

“The Théâtre de la Mode was an important reference because it promoted culture around the world at a very difficult time,” she explained to Vogue France. “It was a way for designers and artists to come together and say tradition of couture was alive in Paris. I have made 37 designs on miniature mannequins to scale, which are presented in a trunk that will be sent around the world to our couture clients.

“During this time, we have spoken a lot about digital. Digital is important, but at the same time, there is artisanal work and details that are not possible to see in a video or photo. With couture, you have to be able to feel the material and see the garment on the body. Craftsmanship is an important tradition that could be lost at this difficult time.”

Alongside the tiny dresses, which are 40 per cent smaller than their original size, clients will also receive a real-size toile so they can try the pieces on.

For the designs themselves, Chiuri drew on the work of several female surrealist artists, including photographer Lee Miller and artist Leonora Carrington.

“During the pandemic, we have been thinking more, reflecting more, dreaming more. Surrealism makes you dream and so should couture,” she shared.

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