Haider Ackermann exiting Berluti

Haider Ackermann is departing Berluti after three seasons at the label.The Colombian-born designer joined the Paris-based menswear brand in September 2016 and has since gone on to build a reputation for his sharp suits and eye-catching accessories.But …

Haider Ackermann is departing Berluti after three seasons at the label.

The Colombian-born designer joined the Paris-based menswear brand in September 2016 and has since gone on to build a reputation for his sharp suits and eye-catching accessories.

But on Friday (30Mar18), bosses at Berluti parent company Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) announced that Ackermann was exiting his role as creative director.

“Haider has been at the core of the evolution of Berluti’s collections and image these past few seasons,” said Berluti’s chief executive officer Antoine Arnault, according to WWD. “I want to thank him for everything he has accomplished since his arrival. His feel for materials, colours, and his wonderful shows will always be linked to the history of the house.”

Ackermann studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp and went on to work at John Galliano before starting his eponymous line in 2001.

He has not yet shared whether he will be joining another fashion house or concentrating on his own brand but uploaded a statement on Instagram in which he explained how happy he was to have been a part of the Berluti story.

“I am immensely proud to have been able to put my creativity at the service of this house with an exceptional know-how, whilst working with a passionate team. I thank them for their commitment,” he added.

Ackermann’s exit marks another shake-up within the world of men’s fashion, as Hedi Slimane has recently joined Celine, where he will debut menswear, and Kim Jones has left his role at Louis Vuitton in order to take up the role of head menswear designer at Dior Homme, succeeding Kris Van Assche. Off-White designer Virgil Abloh will replace Jones at Louis Vuitton.

Berluti executives are expected to announce Ackermann’s successor shortly.

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Rosie Huntington-Whiteley felt ‘unprotected’ on some photoshoots

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley has recalled how she felt “unprotected” on some of her early photoshoots.The British model is one of the most-sought after names in the fashion industry, having fronted campaigns for the likes of Burberry, Paige Denim and Mark…

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley has recalled how she felt “unprotected” on some of her early photoshoots.

The British model is one of the most-sought after names in the fashion industry, having fronted campaigns for the likes of Burberry, Paige Denim and Marks & Spencer.

Rosie has now been working in the business for 15 years, and in light of the #MeToo movement gaining momentum following a wave of sexual harassment scandals rocking Hollywood in recent months, has now described how she often didn’t feel comfortable on some shoots.

“There’s definitely been instances where I’ve felt unprotected and moments where I found myself in situations that were uncomfortable,” she told Harper’s Bazaar Arabia. “The fashion industry is so relaxed and casual, there’s this expectation on models that the more up for it you are, the better, the further you’ll go along in your career.”

Rosie went on to explain that there have been instances where she didn’t speak out because she feared she would lose her job or upset people. And she finds it frustrating that modelling still isn’t considered to be “a real career”.

“With modelling, it’s always been deemed as not a real career and there’s a lot of expectation on girls that the better the model you are, the quieter you are and the least amount of fuss you make,” the 30-year-old shared. “Over the last few years, what’s been really great for me is that I’ve managed to work myself into a position where I’m able to have my voice heard and work with people who want to empower me.”

In addition to modelling, Rosie has broken into the film industry with appearances in movies such as 2011’s Transformers: Dark of the Moon. Interestingly, the blonde beauty explained that movie sets are often much better organised and regulated than fashion shows and photoshoots.

“I’ve been lucky enough to work on a couple of films as an actress. There’s a union, there’s insurance, there’s regulations, there’s work hours, there’s boundaries,” she said.

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Christy Turlington believes fashion can still be sustainable

Christy Turlington has encouraged people to make environmentally friendly choices when buying clothes.The American model has partnered with H&M to help promote their Conscious Exclusive 2018 collection, which consists of garments created from organic a…

Christy Turlington has encouraged people to make environmentally friendly choices when buying clothes.

The American model has partnered with H&M to help promote their Conscious Exclusive 2018 collection, which consists of garments created from organic and sustainable materials, such as ECONYL, a 100 per cent regenerated nylon fibre made from fishnets.

Christy is pleased to see lines like this offering buyers the option to make more conscious decisions when shopping.

“Fashion and sustainability is no longer a contradiction in terms,” she explained in an interview with British Vogue. “It seems to me that everyone who has means and choice is more invested in the brands they choose, and in the way that those products are made and how the people who make them are treated.”

The 49-year-old is married to Saving Private Ryan star Edward Burns, 50, with whom she has two children, 14-year-old daughter Grace and 12-year-old son Finn. And the supermodel believes that having a family has strengthened her desire to consider the future of the planet in both her work and her everyday life.

“I have two children and young nieces and nephews so anything that helps protect the environment is important,” she insisted. “I am especially interested in the health and wellbeing of the people who make garments.”

This is the seventh edition of the Swedish retailer’s ethical collection, and is rooted in the home of the former Swedish artists, husband and wife Carl and Karin Larsson. Christy went on to share her admiration for the similarities the H&M collection shares with conventional clothing.

“I was really impressed that a lot of the fabrics had been basically created from scratch in order to incorporate sustainable fibres,” the fashion icon smiled. “The floral metallic jacquard, for example, is made mostly from recycled polyester, but it looks, feels and moves like a more traditional jacquard. That kind of dedication to crafting the pieces is felt throughout the whole collection.”

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Stella McCartney regains full control of her fashion brand

Stella McCartney has regained full control of her eponymous fashion brand.After a stint at French fashion house Chloe, the British designer launched her own label in partnership with fashion conglomerate Kering in 2001. Focusing on using sustainable an…

Stella McCartney has regained full control of her eponymous fashion brand.

After a stint at French fashion house Chloe, the British designer launched her own label in partnership with fashion conglomerate Kering in 2001.

Focusing on using sustainable and vegan-friendly fabrics, over the years McCartney has expanded the company to include swimwear, footwear, children’s clothes and activewear, and on Wednesday (28Mar18) confirmed she had made a deal with Kering chairman and chief executive officer Francois-Henri Pinault to buy back her business.

“It is the right moment to acquire the full control of the company bearing my name. This opportunity represents a crucial patrimonial decision for me,” she said in a statement. “I am extremely grateful to Francois-Henri Pinault and his family and everyone at the Kering group for everything we have built together in the last 17 years. I look forward to the next chapter of my life and what this brand and our team can achieve in the future.”

McCartney is acquiring Kering’s 50 per cent stake, meaning the 46-year-old will become the sole owner of the brand in its entirety. Though she is parting ways with the luxury giant, which also owns Gucci, Saint Laurent, Brioni and Balenciaga, McCartney plans on retaining a relationship with her former partners and will remain a board member of the Kering Foundation, which is dedicated to stopping violence against women, as well as an adviser on the field of sustainable fashion.

“It is the right time for Stella to move to the next stage. Kering is a luxury group that empowers creative minds and helps disruptive ideas become reality,” added Pinault. “I am extremely proud of what Kering and Stella McCartney have accomplished together since 2001. I would like to thank Stella and her team wholeheartedly for everything they have brought to Kering – far beyond business. Stella knows she can always count on my friendship and support.”

McCartney’s collections are currently available in more than 100 countries at wholesale, and through 51 free-standing stores including London, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Dubai.

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Helena Christensen: ‘Selfies shouldn’t be shared on social media’

Helena Christensen is adamant that selfies shouldn’t be posted on social media.The Danish supermodel rose to fame in the 1990s, fronting campaigns for top brands including Chanel, Versace and Prada, but is also an accomplished photographer. Thus, Helen…

Helena Christensen is adamant that selfies shouldn’t be posted on social media.

The Danish supermodel rose to fame in the 1990s, fronting campaigns for top brands including Chanel, Versace and Prada, but is also an accomplished photographer.

Thus, Helena knows all there is to know about taking the perfect selfie but believes there is no place for such images online.

“I think you can learn a lot about yourself from doing selfies. But I don’t think it’s necessary to show them all,” she said in an interview with Marie Claire U.K. “Sometimes you need to keep your selfies to yourself. It all comes down to good lighting. Direct flat light is good. Or a good backlight. So play around. Turn yourself 360-degrees and find the light. If it is coming straight at you or from above, put your chin down slightly. If it’s above, then top your chin up. That will give you deeper cheekbones.”

The 49-year-old went on to explain that she doesn’t see herself as a model-turned-photographer, and claimed that “in fact, it’s the other way around”. Though her successful fashion career has taught her a great deal about the process of taking a snap.

“It was almost like going to the best international photography school,” the 49-year-old said. “I shot with the best photographers, so was able to learn their craft directly from them and absorb all this technical knowledge too. Like everyone from Irving Penn to Annie Leibovitz. It was the most extensive education I could have had. It was like being an intern in the most luxurious intern position.”

While Helena isn’t a fan of uploading selfies, she does use social media and tends to treat her own Instagram account as a “visual diary”. But she is relieved the platform didn’t exist when she was in her modelling heyday.

“It’s an added pressure. Nowadays, girls are measured by the number of followers they have, rather than by being just themselves,” she lamented.

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Band of Outsiders’ Scott Sternberg launches new brand

Band of Outsiders founder Scott Sternberg is making his return to fashion with new label Entireworld.The American designer walked away from Band of Outsiders in June 2015 after he filed for bankruptcy, letting fans know of his departure via an Instagra…

Band of Outsiders founder Scott Sternberg is making his return to fashion with new label Entireworld.

The American designer walked away from Band of Outsiders in June 2015 after he filed for bankruptcy, letting fans know of his departure via an Instagram post. The label carried on without him though, recruiting a new creative team to take over.

He once again used an online platform to announce news of his new project on Wednesday (28Mar18), uploading a video to Vimeo which was filled with movie clips, including sequences from Dirty Dancing, images of rock stars like Mick Jagger and videos of moments that changed the world.

“I guess the question was like, ‘Why did I want to start a clothing brand right now, I mean aren’t there enough brands out there, enough clothes? Didn’t I do that already, and didn’t that, like, not end so well?’ Well yes,” he mused in the voice over. “But then I started thinking about everything I love about clothing – colour and fabric, it’s connection to history and film, music. I started thinking about what it would be like to make something more democratic this time, without compromising anything about the design or the quality.”

He added that how he was inspired by the thought that brands can be meaningful, how they can create a sense of community and commonality, entertain people and help tell stories.

“So, I started thinking about this idea of utopia, building a perfect world from scratch,” he continued.

News of the new label has excited the fashion world, especially the fact that no garment costs more than $95 (£56).

The line drops on Monday (02Apr18).

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Gisele Bundchen’s quarterback husband is more into fashion than her

Gisele Bundchen reckons her American football player husband Tom Brady is a bigger fashion fan than she is.The supermodel was one of the first Brazilians to achieve international success in the industry, having walked the catwalk for the likes of Dior,…

Gisele Bundchen reckons her American football player husband Tom Brady is a bigger fashion fan than she is.

The supermodel was one of the first Brazilians to achieve international success in the industry, having walked the catwalk for the likes of Dior, Dolce & Gabbana and Valentino.

Working with the biggest fashion names means Gisele knows her stuff when it comes to style, but in spite of her expertise, Tom has never needed any fashion advice from his wife.

“I’ve never in my life told him to wear anything,” she said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal. “You should see our closets… It’s so funny. I would say that he likes fashion more than I like fashion. I would say he’s changed his haircut in one year more than I’ve changed in my whole life.”

Gisele married the New England Patriots quarterback in 2009, and they’re proud parents to eight-year-old son Benjamin and daughter Vivian, five. The model is also stepmother to Tom’s son John, 10, from his previous relationship with actress Bridget Moynahan.

During her chat with the publication, 37-year-old Gisele later shared that, in spite of her killer body, she is partial to the occasional sweet treat, and the whole family have developed a love for Dunkin’ Donuts since Tom suggested they bring a box to Benjamin’s hockey practice.

“It’s become a thing that we bring it,” she explained. “Do you know those things called Munchkins (Donut Holes)? Oh, my God. I cannot have one (Munchkin). I have to have, like, 10. They’re so tiny… it’s a guilty pleasure.”

The fashion icon also insisted that she’d never force Tom to retire from playing in the National Football League (NFL), even though she admits the dangerous sport does cause her concerns for his health.

“He has a laser focus on just winning and being the best, and I said, ‘You know what? This is what you’re doing right now in your life, and you need to feel complete in it,'” she said.

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Winnie Harlow calls out publication for deeming her a ‘vitiligo sufferer’

Winnie Harlow has called out a publication for referring to her as a “vitiligo sufferer”.The Canadian fashion model, who has a prominent form of skin condition vitiligo, first rose to prominence as a contestant on America’s Next Top Model in 2014 and h…

Winnie Harlow has called out a publication for referring to her as a “vitiligo sufferer”.

The Canadian fashion model, who has a prominent form of skin condition vitiligo, first rose to prominence as a contestant on America’s Next Top Model in 2014 and has since gone on to star in campaigns for the likes of Diesel and Swarovski.

However, Winnie has made her feelings known after noticing that British newspaper The Evening Standard had referred to her as “the Canadian vitiligo sufferer” in an article, and tagged the publication in a lengthy Instagram post venting her frustration.

“@eveningstandardmagazine @evening.standard and all other tabloids, magazines and people who write articles on me PSA: I’m not a ‘Vitiligo Sufferer,'” she wrote next to a picture of The Evening Standard article on Tuesday (27Mar18). “I’m not a “Vitiligo model”. I am Winnie. I am a model. And i happen to have Vitiligo. Stop putting these titles on me or anyone else. I AM NOT SUFFERING! If anything I’m SUCCEEDING at showing people that their differences don’t make them WHO they are (sic)!”

The 23-year-old went on to insist that while our differences “are a part of who we are” they don’t “define” us.

“I’m sick of every headline ending in ‘Vitiligo Sufferer’ or ‘Suffers from Vitiligo’. Do you see me suffering?” Winnie asked. “The only thing I’m suffering from are your headlines and the closed minds of humans who have one beauty standard locked into their minds when there are multiple standards of beauty!”

Vitiligo is a disease where skin pigment cells are destroyed in certain areas, and the fashion star has previously spoken about her resistance to being categorised by her condition.

“I’m very sick of talking about my skin,” she told Elle Canada in 2016. “I’m not a vitiligo spokesperson just because I have vitiligo…If that inspires you, I’m proud, but I’m not going to put pressure on myself to be the best person in the world and tell everyone I have vitiligo. If you want to know about it, you can do your research. Either way, I’m not in the dictionary under ‘vitiligo.'”

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Iman shares her simple strategy for combatting discrimination in fashion

Iman makes a point of supporting brands that promote inclusivity and diversity in fashion.The Somalia-born supermodel was a muse for the likes of Halston, Gianni Versace, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and Yves Saint Laurent during her heyday as a high fash…

Iman makes a point of supporting brands that promote inclusivity and diversity in fashion.

The Somalia-born supermodel was a muse for the likes of Halston, Gianni Versace, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and Yves Saint Laurent during her heyday as a high fashion model and has since gone on to establish herself as a beauty mogul with her company, Iman Cosmetics.

Promoting diversity in the industry has long been at the forefront of Iman’s mind and she has now shared her simple strategy for combatting discrimination.

“If a designer boycotts me, I should boycott him,” she told actress Taraji P. Henson in an interview for the April (18) issue of Harper’s Bazaar magazine. “I’m not going to buy a bag from someone who doesn’t use black models. We should celebrate and highlight the people who actually step it up.”

Iman kicked off her modelling career in 1975, when she was discovered by photographer Peter Beard.

In the early days, she looked up to people such as Naomi Sims, who is widely credited as the first African-American supermodel and has recalled how different the business was then.

“Funnily enough, there were more black models working back when I started than there have been recently,” the 62-year-old said, adding that she was inspired to team with Bethann Hardison and Naomi Campbell to push for a new wave of faces a couple of years ago. “We talked about it in the press and to the CFDA, and I think we’re seeing the change on the runways and in campaigns.”

Iman, the widow of rock musician David Bowie, was named as a Fashion Icon by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) in 2010. While she counts that award as an important achievement, she doesn’t see it as any more important than any of her other accomplishments.

“It’s a weighty title, but at the same time the Fashion Icon Award is just a title. Of course, it’s nice that it comes from peers in the fashion industry,” she smiled.

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Bridget Malcolm apologises for publicising ‘unhealthy eating habits’

Bridget Malcolm has apologised to her fans for publicising her “damaging” eating habits.The Australian model launched her career in 2011 and has since gone on to walk the runway for the likes of Ralph Lauren, Stella McCartney and Victoria’s Secret. Pe…

Bridget Malcolm has apologised to her fans for publicising her “damaging” eating habits.

The Australian model launched her career in 2011 and has since gone on to walk the runway for the likes of Ralph Lauren, Stella McCartney and Victoria’s Secret.

Petite Bridget has hit headlines in recent weeks after sharing her shocking experiences with body shaming on photoshoots and has now penned a blog post detailing her struggles with body dysmorphia, a disorder characterised by the obsessive idea that some aspect of one’s own appearance is flawed.

“I would like to acknowledge and apologise for some of the things I wrote and spoke about over the past couple of years,” the 26-year-old wrote. “I genuinely thought that I was doing the right thing for my health and wellness. I now know that I was completely in the depths of body dysmorphia and it really worries me that I was not a positive role model out there.”

Bridget went on to state that she was always truthful in interviews when she was asked to describe her diet and exercise regime, though admitted that her diet for the last couple of years has mostly consisted of vegetables and protein shakes.

And at the height of her struggles with body image, she would become “sick with worry” if she was offered a piece of fruit to eat or didn’t complete her gym routine by a specific time.

“If I had a 5am call time, I would be in the gym at 3:30am. If my flight landed at 8pm, I would be in the gym at 9pm,” the blonde star shared. “I would eat such an extreme diet, and train so hard because I would look in the mirror and see someone who needed to lose weight looking back at me.”

Bridget now abides by a plant-based diet as she is lactose intolerant and has noticed a rise in her energy levels and general wellbeing. And going forward, she hopes that she can use her public profile to help others dealing with similar issues.

“I truly hope that you guys can accept my apology. I said some things in the media that make me cringe now. Being completely at odds with what I saw in the mirror and who I thought I was led me down a dark path of denial. I am not making excuses for the past – far from it. I just wanted to share with you all a little of how twisted my mind was, at the time of talking about my diet,” she added.

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