Alexa Chung: ‘Dungarees are my comfort blanket’

Alexa Chung is so obsessed with dungarees that she wakes up most mornings and thinks about what pair she wants to wear.The model, designer and presenter opened up about her love for the denim garment, known as overalls in America, in an op-ed for U.S. …

Alexa Chung is so obsessed with dungarees that she wakes up most mornings and thinks about what pair she wants to wear.

The model, designer and presenter opened up about her love for the denim garment, known as overalls in America, in an op-ed for U.S. InStyle magazine, in which she revealed they are her go-to outfit almost daily.

“Every morning when I get up and think about what I want to wear, dungarees – or overalls, as Americans call them – are the thing that pops into my head most often. They’re like a comfort blanket for me in terms of style. I know that they suit my body shape,” she explained, adding that they are a “good reflection of my tomboyish personality.”

The 36-year-old confessed that she relied on hiding behind the androgynous look of dungarees to help her when she wasn’t comfortable showing off her body.

“In my 20s I used to wear them on dates because whenever I’d try on something sexy, I’d just freak out and put my dungarees back on,” the Next in Fashion co-host said. “The idea of being in my prime and not wanting to show off appealed to me, so as my own churlish way of refusing to play dress-up for the boys, I’d also wear them when I was modelling or hosting on TV.”

Alexa had the perfect opportunity to create her “ultimate pair” of dungarees when she started her eponymous fashion label back in 2017.

“I wanted to make them more form-fitting so that they are snug at the hip and then relax into a flare,” she shared. “That way you can see that you have a bum and a waist, and they can be kind of secretly sexy.”

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Henry Holland’s fashion label goes into administration

Henry Holland’s fashion label House of Holland has gone into administration. The British designer, who gained attention for his T-shirts bearing rhyming slogans such as “I’ll Tell You Who’s Boss Kate Moss”, had been searching for investors for his fas…

Henry Holland’s fashion label House of Holland has gone into administration.

The British designer, who gained attention for his T-shirts bearing rhyming slogans such as “I’ll Tell You Who’s Boss Kate Moss”, had been searching for investors for his fashion label, which he founded in 2008, after battling “difficult trading pressures”. He has now called in the administrators.

“House of Holland rose to prominence as a forward-thinking British label, with its signature slogan T-shirts and collaborations with a number of high street brands,” said Will Wright, a partner at KPMG and the joint administrator, in a statement, according to The Guardian. “However, with apparel experiencing the same difficult trading pressures as others across the U.K. retail market, the company needed to raise additional investment in order for it to continue.”

The administrators plan to continue the business via the House of Holland website while they find new investors to protect the future of the brand.

The news comes shortly after Holland announced he was stepping down from his own label at the end of February.

“After the most incredible ride, my journey at the helm of House of Holland has come to an end,” the 36-year-old said in a statement. “No one could have predicted the success that we would achieve and the fun we would have. I want to thank everyone who has supported me to this point, most importantly my team who have worked tirelessly throughout. I will forever be indebted to them and the industry for embracing House of Holland and everything we stand for.”

Holland added that while he was sad to be closing that chapter of his life, he was excited to pursue a career as an independent brand consultant.

House of Holland began in 2008 as a PayPal link on Holland’s Myspace page when he was still the fashion editor of teen magazines. His range of slogan T-shirts were popularised by his childhood friend, model Agyness Deyn, and promoted by his famous pals such as Alexa Chung and Daisy Lowe. He also had a long-running collaboration with U.K. department store Debenhams, which is believed to have come to end last year just before it went into administration itself.

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Chloe explores ‘ethereal womanhood’ with fall 20 collection

Chloe has delved into the idea of “ethereal womanhood” for its fall/winter 2020 collection.Creative director Natacha Ramsay-Levi unveiled her latest line at the Grand Palais as part of Paris Fashion Week on Thursday, with the presentation, titled If Yo…

Chloe has delved into the idea of “ethereal womanhood” for its fall/winter 2020 collection.

Creative director Natacha Ramsay-Levi unveiled her latest line at the Grand Palais as part of Paris Fashion Week on Thursday, with the presentation, titled If You Listen Carefully… I’ll Show You How to Dance, attracting celebrities such as Lucy Boynton, Kate Bosworth, and Alexa Chung.

Marianne Faithfull was in attendance too, with the French designer having tapped the singer to recite poetry for the soundtrack. In addition, Ramsay-Levi utilised prints from her friend Rita Ackermann’s artwork in the ready-to-wear range and engaged sculptor Marion Verboom to create the gilded totem poles that lined the runway.

According to the show notes, the designs are “an exploration of masculine codes and ethereal womanhood,” as well as an examination of the “women who reject the boundaries of classical definition”.

Showcasing muted earth tones, the spectacle opened with Kaia Gerber walking the runway in a beige shirt dress with orange embroidery on the sleeves and a brown leather belt. The outfit was accessorised with dark red socks and chunky brown leather brogues.

Silhouettes verged on the conservative side, with models sporting long polka dot dresses with wide white collars, long denim skirts with forest green cardigans, beige wide-legged trousers and plaid tops, while elements of Ackermann’s creations appeared as patchworks on shirts and pleated skirts.

Elsewhere, coats were a big focus, with Gigi Hadid modelling a long brown wool version over a long dress with sheer black panelling, and other models showing off quilted uniform-style options and belted trench coats with oversized shoulders.

To conclude, Ramsay-Levi included a line-up of feminine dresses, with highlights including a dark green number featuring voluminous sleeves, and a buttery yellow gown with jewelled elements on the neckline.

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Dior incites call for female solidarity with fall 20 collection

Dior has incited a call for female solidarity with its latest fashion collection.Creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri unveiled her fall/winter 2020 line at the Jardin des Tuileries as part of Paris Fashion Week on Tuesday, with the presentation attrac…

Dior has incited a call for female solidarity with its latest fashion collection.

Creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri unveiled her fall/winter 2020 line at the Jardin des Tuileries as part of Paris Fashion Week on Tuesday, with the presentation attracting celebrities such as Sigourney Weaver, Andie MacDowell, Cara Delevingne, Demi Moore, Nina Dobrev, Rachel Brosnahan, Karlie Kloss, and Alexa Chung.

The entrance to the space was decorated with a sign featuring the ambiguous phrase “I Say I”, a reference to the work of collective feminist artist Claire Fontaine as well as the introduction to the manifesto of art critic-turned-feminist activist Carla Lonzi. In addition, illuminated signs with slogans such as “Consent,” “Women’s Love is Unpaid Labour,” “Women are the Moon that Moves the Tides,” and “Patriarchy Kills Love,” were installed in the venue.

“They are the symbol of a joyful singularity, as well as a creative and collective way of approaching the multiple aspects of feminine subjectivity – and the infinite project that femininity represents,” a Dior representative explained of the concept.

To begin, the spectacle kicked off with model Ruth Bell walking the runway in a black suit, white shirt, black tie, fishnet tights, and Mary Jane-style flats.

A number of black outfits followed, with the looks toughened up via the addition of bandanas, tights, and combat boots. Elsewhere, a ’70s vibe was evident in long, embroidered dresses, miniskirts, and pleats and fringe detailing, while Chiuri also drew upon former creative director Marc Bohan’s use of check fabric in his designs during his 30-year-old stint at the French house, as well as founder Christian Dior’s love of the fabric.

To conclude, the designer offered up a selection of chic separates, with highlights including striped metallic gowns, Grecian-inspired dresses with finely pleated skirts and drapery, as well as relaxed takes on classic menswear tailoring and suits.

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Victoria Beckham dishes up ‘gentle rebellion’ for fall 20

Victoria Beckham has explored the tension between “refinement and rebellion” for her fall/winter 2020 collection.The British designer unveiled her latest line at The Banqueting House as part of London Fashion Week on Sunday, with the presentation attra…

Victoria Beckham has explored the tension between “refinement and rebellion” for her fall/winter 2020 collection.

The British designer unveiled her latest line at The Banqueting House as part of London Fashion Week on Sunday, with the presentation attracting the likes of Anna Wintour, Samantha Ronson, Alexa Chung, Karen Elson, and Sinead Burke, as well as Victoria’s husband David Beckham and their four children.

Regarding her inspiration for the range, the fashion star explained that she wanted to add a bit of edge to her go-to feminine silhouettes.

“This season, I was thinking about the tension between refinement and rebellion. I was inspired by different ideas of women – different characters, different moments, and different attitudes – but with no restrictions. The overriding sentiment was that we don’t have to follow the rules. We can follow our instincts. Be spirited,” she wrote in the show notes. “The silhouette has evolved with a newness, a freshness. Shorter abbreviated proportions feel different and right for now. I wanted to explore how to honour tradition but challenge convention. To be subversive, yet still sophisticated. The collection is about staying true to ourselves and our woman, but still surprising her, and us. Twisting our codes. This is what I call my gentle rebellion.”

To open, a model walked the runway in a black velvet dress with plunging neckline and black leather boots. The outfit was given a touch of sparkle via the addition of crystal drop earrings.

A number of black ensembles followed, many of which were accessorised with belts featuring interlocking hand designs.

Victoria also introduced a line-up of plaid separates, brightly coloured knitwear, and cosy coats, before concluding the show by having models parade the runway in winter-ready dresses with voluminous sleeves.

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Alexa Chung urges shoppers to buy vintage clothing

Alexa Chung has urged shoppers to ditch fast fashion and invest in vintage clothes instead.The model and designer, who is currently co-hosting the new Netflix series Next In Fashion with Queer Eye stylist Tan France, is adamant it is still possible to …

Alexa Chung has urged shoppers to ditch fast fashion and invest in vintage clothes instead.

The model and designer, who is currently co-hosting the new Netflix series Next In Fashion with Queer Eye stylist Tan France, is adamant it is still possible to follow current trends without buying from brands that mass produce items.

“Loads of fashion ideas or trends are regurgitated from the past so you could just buy vintage things,” the 36-year-old told BBC Radio 1’s Newsbeat. “They’re readily available, easy and cheap – about three things I’m wearing now are vintage. ”

Alexa also has her own eponymous clothing line, which she was keen to make available to hire for those who would not be able to afford to buy her pieces off the rack.

“It’s something celebrities have the luxury of doing because they borrow from a fashion house and then they send it back and they’re just wearing it for one event,” she explained. “Sharing clothes is such a brilliant idea because it’s true that you might want something special for one occasion, but you don’t want to keep it in your wardrobe.”

Elsewhere in the interview, the TV presenter shared her excitement over Next In Fashion, insisting the programme gives up and coming designers a chance to shine.

“It’s quite typical that you can be one of the most talented people at a company but you’re not necessarily the name of the house. This show gives them a chance if they want to start their own brand and really drive their business forward,” Alexa shared.

Alexa and Tan will serve as both co-hosts and judges on Next In Fashion, as they critique the contestants’ offerings alongside famous faces including designer Tommy Hilfiger, model Adriana Lima, and celebrity stylist Elizabeth Stewart.

The winner will be awarded a $250,000 (£191,500) cash prize, as well as the chance to create a range for Net-a-Porter.

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Alexa Chung took a trip down memory lane to design debut Barbour collection

Alexa Chung drew on her own memories when designing her first ever collection for Barbour. The 35-year-old, who has signed a two-year, four-season deal with the 125-year-old British label, revealed in a chat with Vogue.co.uk her earliest memory of sli…

Alexa Chung drew on her own memories when designing her first ever collection for Barbour.

The 35-year-old, who has signed a two-year, four-season deal with the 125-year-old British label, revealed in a chat with Vogue.co.uk her earliest memory of slipping on one of the iconic waxed jackets was to muck out her pony in Hampshire, England as a child.

“I was happy as Larry,” she grinned. “I have so many memories wearing Barbour but the earliest are the most nostalgic and therefore special.”

So the decision to collaborate with Barbour was a no-brainer for the TV presenter-turned-designer.

“It was an opportunity for me to explore how the Alexa Chung brand interprets an iconic and historic label that is woven into the British psyche,” she explained.

Taking a research trip to Barbour HQ in South Shields, England was a “waxy dream” for Chung, who was “let loose, like a kid in a candy store, into a room filled with every single Barbour piece through history”.

Her first collection launched earlier this month, with a second drop due in August, which features a quilted green coat with corduroy collars and cuffs.

Chung’s debut for Barbour included shorter sleeves, snugger silhouettes and exterior label detailing, with a bold logo features a lighthouse motif and both brand names.

“Look at any image of me in Barbour from yesteryear and you will see that I often turn up the sleeves of the jackets to show off the lining,” she explained.

The Barbour by Alexa Chung collection is priced from £249 ($316) to £429 ($544), and available from Barbour.com/alexachung, Alexachung.com and selected stockists worldwide.

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Alexa Chung finds combing her eyebrows ‘very relaxing’

Alexa Chung always takes time to comb her eyebrows as she finds the process “really therapeutic”.The British designer and presenter is known for her ability to pull off just about any fashion or beauty trend and always turns heads when she steps out on…

Alexa Chung always takes time to comb her eyebrows as she finds the process “really therapeutic”.

The British designer and presenter is known for her ability to pull off just about any fashion or beauty trend and always turns heads when she steps out onto the red carpet.

Alexa has now shared some of her top secrets for looking good in a video tutorial for Vogue.com and divulged that she insists on doing her own brows.

“(I) just brush those guys up. I spent years growing these back after some ’90s overplucking,” she said, before going on to demonstrate how she will brush her arches up with a toothbrush if she doesn’t have a spoolie brush. “I also, when I have my make-up done, if I’m lucky enough to, they have to hand me the brush, ’cause this is one of my favourite things to do. I find it really therapeutic. It’s very relaxing.”

Alexa went on to explain that she is a big fan of The Cream by Augustinus Bader, Lucas’ Papaw Ointment, La Mer’s The Concealer and RMS’ Un Cover-Up Foundation.

She also uses a black eyeliner pen to achieve her signature cat-eye look.

“My guide for it is to follow the bottom of your eye up, so it’s kind of like an extension of that and that’s your marker. Other people do things like measuring degrees or things that seem quite mathematical, but I just think you are going for something that’s like up and out,” the 35-year-old commented of her technique.

Elsewhere, Alexa used Glossier’s Lash Slick Mascara on her lashes and Charlotte Tilbury’s Matte Revolution Lipstick in Pillow Talk on her pout. She outlined how she uses Dior Backstage’s Glow Face Palette on her eyes too.

“I am a magpie for pretty, coloured things,” she smiled. “I believe (this) is meant to be for like highlighting your face, cheeks, et cetera… I don’t understand how to do that contour, or highlight, or whatever. So, I just thought it was really nice and I’m going to use it as an eyeshadow.”

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Alexa Chung and Tan France to front Netflix fashion show

Alexa Chung and Tan France will co-host a new fashion series heading to Netflix. The model and designer has teamed up with the much-loved Queer Eye stylist to find the next big name in fashion on their new show, Next In Fashion. According to Harper’s…

Alexa Chung and Tan France will co-host a new fashion series heading to Netflix.

The model and designer has teamed up with the much-loved Queer Eye stylist to find the next big name in fashion on their new show, Next In Fashion.

According to Harper’s Bazaar, the duo will front the high-stakes competition series, in which 18 designers face challenges focusing on a different trend or design style that has influenced the way we dress.

The contestants, who have already worked for major fashion brands and celebrities, will compete head-to-head, and the lucky winner will receive $250,000 and the opportunity to debut their collection with luxury retailer Net-a-Porter.

The 10-episode long series will also feature stylist Elizabeth Stewart and director of fashion partnerships at Instagram Eva Chen as judges, with additional guest judges to be announced at a later date.

France, who is releasing his new memoir Naturally Tan in June, took to Instagram to share the exciting news.

“ANNOUNCEMENT!! Beyond excited to host Netflix’s first fashion show @nextinfashion with the one and only, my new work wife, @alexachung. Coming soon!” he wrote alongside a snap of him with Chung.

Chung, who has been busy working on her eponymous fashion brand, shared her glee at working with the Queer Eye star.

“Netflix and chill? Incredibly excited to be hosting Netflix’s first fashion show @nextinfashion alongside my new husband @tanfrance Coming soon! Yeah I like to tuck I got a tucking problem,” she wrote, referencing France’s love for tucking in shirts on his makeover show.

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Alexa Chung and Poppy Delevingne team up on charity T-shirt

Alexa Chung and Poppy Delevingne have created a line of T-shirts raising funds for Save the Children.The pals worked together on the project to mark the charity’s 100th anniversary, and also the launch of Save the Children’s Stop the War on Children ca…

Alexa Chung and Poppy Delevingne have created a line of T-shirts raising funds for Save the Children.

The pals worked together on the project to mark the charity’s 100th anniversary, and also the launch of Save the Children’s Stop the War on Children campaign.

Available in three colourways – navy, white and yellow – the tee, designed by Chung and modelled by Delevingne, features an illustration of a crescent moon face alongside the words The Future is Now.

“To me (the moon) symbolises children’s dreams, hopes and the promise of a new day,” Chung explained, reports Vogue.co.uk. “Sadly, not all children have the chance to enjoy such innocent childhoods as millions are battling through conflicts started by adults. But they should, and we need to fight for their futures and help them fulfil their potential by ensuring all children are off limits in war.”

Thirty per cent of the profits will go directly to Save the Children. The adults’ T-shirt has a price tag of £25 ($32), while the children’s version comes in at £15 ($19).

For the accompanying images, Delevingne roped in shoe designer Tabitha Simmons to style her, had Gucci Westman on make-up duty and enlisted Cass Bird to art direct and photograph the campaign.

“Having visited many Save The Children programmes over the past four years, I’ve met with some of the most inspiring and amazing children who, despite adversity and conflict, have not only survived to tell their stories but are now thriving and full of hope for a better future,” Delevingne said about her ambassadorial role. “It’s because of these children and their daily fight that Alexa and I wanted to create something that would help make a change and encourage people to do something good.”

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