Alexandra Shulman breaks silence on Helena Christensen backlash

Alexandra Shulman has admitted her scathing attack on Helena Christensen’s recent decision to wear a corset was not her “finest hour”.The former British Vogue editor took an instant dislike to the outfit the 50-year-old model wore to Gigi Hadid’s denim…

Alexandra Shulman has admitted her scathing attack on Helena Christensen’s recent decision to wear a corset was not her “finest hour”.

The former British Vogue editor took an instant dislike to the outfit the 50-year-old model wore to Gigi Hadid’s denim-themed 24th birthday party in April – a pair of wide-legged jeans, black lace bustier and gold sandals.

Calling the look “tacky”, she went on to suggest that older women should stop dressing in clothes they wore in their younger years.

Helena’s fashion contemporaries, including Naomi Campbell, Karen Elson and Linda Evangelista, and Alexandra’s Vogue replacement Edward Enninful, all leapt to the Danish star’s defence, and the British journalist has finally broken her silence on the matter.

“I think that it certainly wasn’t my finest hour,” she began in a chat on The Telegraph’s Fashion Unzipped podcast. “I’m very pleased that Helena behaved extremely graciously about it. I also think that it is important that you can have an opinion, whether people disagree with it or not – and if you’re going do that then it might be uncomfortable, but you’ve got to take the heat, haven’t you?’

“In other art forms, it’s accepted that you review completely impartially, whether you think an exhibition’s good, a play’s good, a film’s good. In fashion, the idea is that your criticism would be to ignore, but not to actually review and put your point of view.”

In the wake of the comments, which appeared in an article Alexandra penned for The Daily Mail, Helena donned the bustier for a second time, sharing a photo on Instagram of the repeated look and writing: “Let’s continue to elevate and support each other, all you beautiful, smart, fun, sexy, hardworking, talented, nurturing women out there #ooopssheworeabustieragain.”

She also told fans she’d received “flowers and an apology”, though didn’t elaborate who from.

Speaking to The Telegraph, Alexandra continued: “I think it’s an interesting question, how commentary is not really a part of the fashion business. And maybe sometimes because I am a journalist at heart and now, I don’t have any particular allegiances, my kind of knee-jerk like of commentary overturns my… I wouldn’t say good sense, but the point about Helena is that she’s wonderful, and I think I was kind of wrong to make a negative point about how she looked in a bustier. And what people minded was that I attached that to the idea of age.”

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Helena Christensen receives mysterious apology following Alexandra Shulman fall out

Helena Christensen has cryptically told her Instagram followers she’s received “flowers and an apology” following the Alexandra Shulman fall out.Former British Vogue editor Shulman took aim at the Danish model’s outfit of choice for Gigi Hadid’s recent…

Helena Christensen has cryptically told her Instagram followers she’s received “flowers and an apology” following the Alexandra Shulman fall out.

Former British Vogue editor Shulman took aim at the Danish model’s outfit of choice for Gigi Hadid’s recent denim-themed birthday party, calling her corset and jeans look “tacky” and declaring her too old to wear the black lacy bustier.

Fellow supermodels Naomi Campbell, Karen Elson, and Linda Evangelista, as well Shulman’s Vogue replacement Edward Enninful, leapt to the 50-year-old beauty’s defence, and now Christensen has seemingly updated her followers with a turn of events.

Writing on her Instagram Stories, she shared, “We all make mistakes. Flowers and apology received,” followed by a shaking hands emoji.

Hours earlier, she also posted a lengthy statement about corsets, explaining all about the undergarment.

Copying and pasting a passage from Wikipedia, the catwalk star added a smirking face emoji to a line referencing journalists.

“For dress reformists of the late 1800s, corsets were a dangerous moral ‘evil’, promoting promiscuous views of female bodies and superficial dalliance into fashion whims,” the post reads. “The obvious health risks, including damaged and rearranged internal organs, compromised fertility; weakness and general depletion of health were also blamed on excessive corsetry… Preachers inveighed against tightlacing, doctors counselled patients against it (smirking emoji) journalists wrote articles condemning the vanity and frivolity of women who would sacrifice their health for the sake of fashion.

“Whereas for many corseting was accepted as necessary for beauty, health, and an upright military-style posture, dress reformists viewed tightlacing as vain and, especially at the height of the era of Victorian morality, a sign of moral indecency.”

A defiant Christensen donned the lace garment for a second event over the weekend, writing next to snap: “Let’s continue to elevate and support each other, all you beautiful, smart, fun, sexy, hardworking, talented, nurturing women out there #ooopssheworeabustieragain.”

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Models defend Helena Christensen after ex-British Vogue editor slams her ‘tacky’ outfit

Top models have defended Helena Christensen after an ex-British Vogue editor criticised her for wearing a “tacky” outfit to a party.The Danish supermodel stepped out at Gigi Hadid’s denim themed 24th birthday bash in New York City on 22 April (19) spor…

Top models have defended Helena Christensen after an ex-British Vogue editor criticised her for wearing a “tacky” outfit to a party.

The Danish supermodel stepped out at Gigi Hadid’s denim themed 24th birthday bash in New York City on 22 April (19) sporting a pair of wide-legged jeans, black lace bustier, and gold sandals.

However, journalist Alexandra Shulman blasted Helena in her column for Britain’s Mail on Sunday newspaper over the weekend (27-28Apr19), describing her look as “cliched pin-up style”.

In light of the article, the 50-year-old posted a snap of herself in the ensemble on her Instagram page, which she captioned, “Let’s continue to elevate and support each other, all you beautiful, smart, fun, sexy, hardworking, talented, nurturing women out there #ooopssheworeabustieragain,” with the post quickly garnering lots of attention from her celebrity pals.

“Such a cheap shot, she has no right or claims to be writing such a ridiculous article… I’ve known you 30 years and whatever you wear, you wear it WELL with class and dignity!! Hold your head high and keep your drive. Love you always @helenachristensen,” Naomi Campbell wrote in the comments section, and Karen Elson posted, “I just read that article. B**ch please…you are on fire!”

Linda Evangelista noted, “She should be ashamed of herself. You are a goddess,” while current British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful, who succeeded Alexandra following her departure from the publication after 25 years in mid-2017, added: “You are BEAUTIFUL inside and out.”

Elsewhere in the fashion scribe’s piece, the 61-year-old claimed that it was time for Helena to “hand over the fleshpot-at-the-party baton” to the next generation and stated that she felt the brunette beauty was too old to be wearing such revealing garments.

“It’s possible that she just panicked, as you do, when faced with a themed party (this was denim) and thought that turning up as the madam in a one-horse town would fit the bill. But it’s more likely that she did it to show she’s not past it. She’s not going gentle into any good night when it comes to getting her share of the paparazzi’s attention,” she insisted, before going on to describe model Stella Tennant and actress Gillian Anderson as examples of women who have mastered the ability to appear simultaneously sexy and sophisticated.

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Former British Vogue editor producing TV drama inspired by fashion bible

Alexandra Shulman is producing a TV drama about British Vogue in the 1990s.The British journalist acted as editor-in-chief of the fashion publication from 1992 until her departure in June 2017, when she was succeeded by Edward Enninful. Since exiting …

Alexandra Shulman is producing a TV drama about British Vogue in the 1990s.

The British journalist acted as editor-in-chief of the fashion publication from 1992 until her departure in June 2017, when she was succeeded by Edward Enninful.

Since exiting British Vogue, Shulman has kept busy with writing and other ventures, and she has now announced that she is working on a new series about the magazine, to be titled Gold Dust Nation, alongside her former editor-at-large Fiona Golfar.

“It’s wonderful to have the opportunity to bring to life the realities of the world of fashion publishing in a series that will have total authenticity,” she said in a statement. “We will be able to showcase the real issues and real stories that occur when you combine huge creativity with human emotions and dilemmas set in a backdrop of the changing times of recent history.”

Executives at Bad Wolf Productions are making Gold Dust Nation, having recently helmed Sky series A Discovery of Witches.

Founder Jane Tranter will act as executive producer for the show, which she describes as an exploration of the lives of a collection of characters working in the orbit of an internationally famous fashion magazine, such as photographers, stylists, journalists, PRs, hairdressers, designers and interns.

“Alexandra and Fiona’s brilliance is that they have captured the mood of a country pivoting on its heel and heading for one on the most dynamic and contentious periods of British cultural and political history. The creativity, flair and irreverence that made them such a force in the publishing world runs through every ounce of Gold Dust Nation,” added Tranter.

A potential release date has not yet been announced.

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Edward Enninful: ‘Male models don’t come out for fear of not being perfect’

Edward Enninful has opened up about why he doesn’t think many male models come out as gay.The British Vogue editor, who is openly gay, sat down for a chat with Attitude magazine and discussed his theory surrounding male sexuality in the fashion industr…

Edward Enninful has opened up about why he doesn’t think many male models come out as gay.

The British Vogue editor, who is openly gay, sat down for a chat with Attitude magazine and discussed his theory surrounding male sexuality in the fashion industry.

“It’s like Hollywood’s image of the perfect man, and this old notion of what it meant to be a man and that this perfect man couldn’t be gay. We know that’s wrong,” he mused.

Edward was appointed as the Vogue head in April 2017, succeeding long-serving editor Alexandra Shulman in the role.

Since taking the reins, British Vogue subscribers have gone up, with a 1.1 per cent increase in the combined digital and print circulation. Many attribute this to the Ghana-born star’s dedication to promoting diversity in the pages of the fashion glossy.

“I’ve never shied away from being black or gay… I want young kids to know It’s O.K. to be who you are. I want them to know what’s possible in the world. The world I want to create is where you don’t need to be somebody’s son or daughter to get ahead,” said Edward. “When you’re gay you’re always viewed as the ‘other’. You’re able to have empathy – to empathise with people and cultures. That’s why I’m able to be a man and be a stylist all these years and work with all the best women’s magazines and editors because I empathise.”

He added that he never thinks in terms of sex or gender, but rather in respect of what someone is capable of bringing to the table.

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Edward Enninful committed to featuring older models in U.K. Vogue

Edward Enninful is championing older models in his latest act of fashion rebellion.The British Vogue editor landed the job in 2017, replacing Alexandra Shulman after her 25-year run at the top.Ghana-born Edward instantly began to shake things up and re…

Edward Enninful is championing older models in his latest act of fashion rebellion.

The British Vogue editor landed the job in 2017, replacing Alexandra Shulman after her 25-year run at the top.

Ghana-born Edward instantly began to shake things up and rewrite the rules when it came to the fashion glossy, including adding more diversity into the pages of Vogue. He’s now also shared his commitment to casting more mature models.

“So often in fashion it can feel as if age is treated as an unpassable frontier, that women reach a certain time in life and simply disappear from editorials and advertising. It’s something I’m very mindful of not letting happen here at Vogue,” he wrote in his editor’s letter for the July issue.

“Jan (de Villeneuve) is a good case in point, actually. The noted 1960s cover girl shows how being in your eighth decade is no barrier to a renaissance. A few years ago, I got to know Jan the 21st-century way: via Instagram. She messaged me and we got talking, and she told me how much she loved Steven Meisel – and the next minute he was shooting her for Italian Vogue. She got a whole new career from being digitally engaged. How inspiring is that?”

Edward also praised his cover star, singer Ariana Grande. The popstar ditched her famous ponytail and heavy make-up look for the photoshoot, showing off her natural beauty as she opened up about suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder in the wake of the Manchester Arena bombing, which took place after her concert in the English city last year.

“I’m so grateful to Ariana Grande for sharing the experience of her difficult and transformative past year. As she returns with the finest album of her career, Grande is not only a remarkable performer and social-media titan, but in the wake of the Manchester bombing, an icon of positivity and inclusiveness for her millions of young followers. How gratifying it is to see her now making fans of every age,” he praised.

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