Lily James: ‘Filming Rebecca preyed on my own insecurities’

Lily James was unsettled while working on the new adaptation of Rebecca because playing Mrs. de Winter preyed on her own insecurities.In Ben Wheatley’s upcoming adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel, the Cinderella actress portrays de Winter, the…

Lily James was unsettled while working on the new adaptation of Rebecca because playing Mrs. de Winter preyed on her own insecurities.

In Ben Wheatley’s upcoming adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s novel, the Cinderella actress portrays de Winter, the second wife of Armie Hammer’s Maxim, who is forced to live in the shadow of his dead first wife, Rebecca.

Yet, James has now shared that the role ended up affecting her mental health and she began having panic attacks because her “deeply insecure” character preyed on her own issues.

“I found it really hard to let the second Mrs. de Winter go,” she told AnOther magazine. “God, the inner workings of her mind. She’s in such conflict, such turmoil. I started having real panic attacks. My heart would beat so fast.

“For a while after filming, I felt unsettled and discombobulated. It’s certainly the role I’ve inhabited the most. Even talking about it, I get kind of breathless. It’s crazy. It was a really powerful experience. I’m definitely an insecure person and the character is so deeply insecure that playing her preyed on my own insecurities. But that was quite an amazing dichotomy.”

James first revealed the role gave her panic attacks when she gave a BAFTA masterclass at the 2019 International Film Festival & Awards in Macao in December.

“She’s really bullied and gaslighted, she lives in a difficult headspace… I kept having panic attacks after it finished, I couldn’t shake it off,” the 30-year-old said at the time.

She also revealed the Netflix film will be “very different” to Alfred Hitchcock’s Oscar-winning adaptation, which starred Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine and was released in 1940.

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Martin Scorsese defends criticism of Marvel movies

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.Scorses…

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.

The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.

Scorsese addressed the controversy in an article published in The New York Times on Monday, claiming he did not want to attack the artistry of those involved, but stating that they are not to his taste and are crowding other types of films out of cinemas.

“Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry,” the movie legend wrote in his op-ed. “You can see it on the screen. The fact that the films themselves don’t interest me is a matter of personal taste and temperament.

“I know that if I were younger, if I’d come of age at a later time, I might have been excited by these pictures and maybe even wanted to make one myself. But I grew up when I did and I developed a sense of movies – of what they were and what they could be – that was as far from the Marvel universe as we on Earth are from Alpha Centauri.”

The director went on to describe his love of Alfred Hitchcock’s films and compared their spectacular set-pieces to current comic book blockbusters.

However, he also stated that modern blockbuster franchises are “market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption” – unlike those of auteur directors like Spike Lee, Kathryn Bigelow, or Paul Thomas Anderson.

Defending his decision to criticise Marvel, the famed director explained that even iconic auteurs like himself were struggling to get their films into cinemas – as he’d had to turn to Netflix to make his new gangster epic The Irishman.

“We have a theatrical window, which is great,” he complains. “Would I like the picture to play on more big screens for longer periods of time? Of course I would. But no matter whom you make your movie with, the fact is that the screens in most multiplexes are crowded with franchise pictures.”

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Laura Mulleavy talks enduring influence of cinema on Rodarte’s designs

Rodarte designer Laura Mulleavy credits Hollywood’s influence as shaping her as a designer.The California-based fashion star, who co-founded and runs the label with her sister Kate Mulleavy, is big on movies, which she is certain is down to her life gr…

Rodarte designer Laura Mulleavy credits Hollywood’s influence as shaping her as a designer.

The California-based fashion star, who co-founded and runs the label with her sister Kate Mulleavy, is big on movies, which she is certain is down to her life growing up just next to Tinseltown.

She and Kate once considered moving their brand to America’s fashion capital, New York, but U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour convinced them to stay put.

“Overall, I think there’s always been a strong fashion community in Los Angeles; it’s just been through a different lens,” Laura told The Hollywood Reporter. “We have (James) Galanos and Rudi Gernreich and Bob Mackie, and then you have the history of Hollywood costume design, which is so profound on fashion in general. I always looked to film as something that really affected my view of design and my aesthetic.”

As for which films had a lasting impact on Laura, she insisted that the work of horror director Alfred Hitchcock comes out on top. It was the designer’s mother who introduced her to cinema at a young age, and she has been enthralled with it ever since.

“Hitchcock was a big part of my understanding of fashion design and Hollywood,” she explained. “Vertigo was shot at places I used to go to and I know the areas in San Francisco where The Birds (was shot).

“It’s the same thing in L.A. The street corner in Pasadena is Michael Myers’ house (from Halloween). You know the city through these locations in cinema. Because we responded so much to the visual styling of film, fashion just became a part of what Los Angeles is to us. When you see incredible costumes in a film, it’s a very powerful thing that you never get out of your head.”

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Lily James and Armie Hammer to star in Rebecca adaptation

Lily James and Armie Hammer are to star in a new adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca.The Hollywood stars will take on lead roles in the project, which has been greenlit by executives at Netflix and Working Title, producers announced on Wednesday …

Lily James and Armie Hammer are to star in a new adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca.

The Hollywood stars will take on lead roles in the project, which has been greenlit by executives at Netflix and Working Title, producers announced on Wednesday (14Nov18).

British director Ben Wheatley, known for his work on Kill List and High-Rise, will helm the movie, while X-Men and Kingsman franchise writer Jane Goldman is penning the script.

Based on the novel, first released in 1938, the story will tell of a newly-married young woman who, on arriving at her husband’s imposing family estate on a bleak English coast, finds herself battling the shadow of his dead first wife, the mysterious Rebecca, whose legacy continues to haunt the house. Working Title’s Eric Fellner, Tim Bevan, and Nira Park will produce the film. Further casting details or a potential release date have not yet been announced.

Among the other projects currently being made by executives at Working Title include Josie Rourke’s Mary Queen of Scots, starring Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie, Joe Cornish’s The Kid Who Would Be King, featuring Patrick Stewart and Rebecca Ferguson, as well as Tom Hooper’s film adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s musical Cats, starring Ian McKellen, Jennifer Hudson, James Corden, and Taylor Swift.

Baby Driver actress Lily has most recently been seen onscreen in Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again and Darkest Hour. The 29-year-old will next appear in an untitled film being made by Danny Boyle and Richard Curtis.

Meanwhile, Call Me By Your Name star Armie, 32, has been on the road promoting Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You and Anthony Maras’ Hotel Mumbai. He will next be seen on the silver screen as Marty Ginsburg, the husband of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, in biographical drama On the Basis of Sex.

Rebecca was previously adapted for the big screen by Alfred Hitchcock in 1940, with the black and white film starring Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine.

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Ennio Morricone denies making negative comments about Quentin Tarantino

Ennio Morricone has denied ever making disparaging comments about Quentin Tarantino. The legendary Italian composer, who won the Oscar for Best Original Music Score for his work on the American filmmaker’s 2015 movie The Hateful Eight, was quoted in t…

Ennio Morricone has denied ever making disparaging comments about Quentin Tarantino. 

The legendary Italian composer, who won the Oscar for Best Original Music Score for his work on the American filmmaker’s 2015 movie The Hateful Eight, was quoted in the December issue of Germany’s Playboy magazine as labelling his colleague as a “cretin” and “absolutely chaotic”.

However, Morricone issued a statement to The Hollywood Reporter on Sunday (11Nov18) in which he refuted the remarks and alleged that the interview was fabricated.

“I have never expressed any negative statements about the Academy, Quentin, or his films – and certainly do not consider his films garbage,” he said. “I consider Tarantino a great director. I am very fond of my collaboration with him and the relationship we have developed during the time we have spent together. He is courageous and has an enormous personality. I credit our collaboration responsible for getting me an Oscar, which is for sure one of the greatest acknowledgements of my career, and I am forever grateful for the opportunity to compose music for his film.”

Morricone went on to explain that he has given his lawyer in Italy a mandate to “take civil and penal action”. Additionally, he referred to recent comments he made in which he praised Tarantino’s films.

“In London, during a press conference in front of Tarantino, I clearly stated that I consider Quentin one of the greatest directors of this time, and I would never speak poorly of the Academy – an important institution that has given to me two of the most important acknowledgements of my career,” the 90-year-old concluded.

Neither Tarantino nor editors from Playboy Germany are yet to comment on the article.

In the original interview, it was also reported that Morricone stated that Tarantino once asked him to complete a score in just a few days and that the Pulp Fiction helmer lacked originality when compared to the “Hollywood greats, such as John Huston, Alfred Hitchcock or Billy Wilder”.

Morricone, who has acted as the composer for over 70 award-winning films including Sergio Leone’s The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, has also had his music included in Tarantino’s flicks Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained.

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