Natalie Portman honours snubbed female directors in Dior cape at 2020 Oscars

Natalie Portman had the names of snubbed female directors embroidered into her Dior cape at the 2020 Oscars.The 38-year-old made a powerful statement at the prestigious event on Sunday, and walked the red carpet in a black floor-length gown with intric…

Natalie Portman had the names of snubbed female directors embroidered into her Dior cape at the 2020 Oscars.

The 38-year-old made a powerful statement at the prestigious event on Sunday, and walked the red carpet in a black floor-length gown with intricate gold embellishment.

The dress was overlaid with a black cape, which was embroidered with the names of several female filmmakers in gold thread.

Natalie told Los Angeles Times journalist Amy Kaufman that her decision to wear the cape was to “recognise the women who were not recognised for their incredible work this year in my subtle way.”

Stitched onto the Dior cape were the names of Hustlers director Lorene Scafaria, The Farewell’s Lulu Wang, Greta Gerwig for Little Women, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’s Marielle Heller, as well as Atlantics’ Mati Diop, Queen & Slim’s Melina Matsoukas, Honey Boy’s Alma Har’el, and Celine Sciamma for Portrait of a Lady on Fire.

Har’el, who didn’t attend the ceremony, shared a picture of Natalie’s outfit and then a close-up of her surname on the cape, and wrote on Twitter, “My first time at the #Oscars couldn’t have been more beautiful.”

And this isn’t the first time that Natalie, who scooped the Best Actress gong at the Oscars in 2011 for her role in Black Swan, has openly criticised Hollywood for failing to recognise female filmmakers.

At the Golden Globes back in 2018, Natalie famously called out the awards for the lack of female representation as she presented the Best Director category.

“Here are all the male nominees,” she stated as the five male nominees, including Christopher Nolan and Guillermo del Toro, were introduced.

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Saoirse Ronan supports Greta Gerwig after Golden Globes snub

Saoirse Ronan has spoken out in support of her Little Women director Greta Gerwig after she was snubbed by the Golden Globes.Earlier this week, the nominees for the 2020 Golden Globes were announced, revealing that the battle for Best Director would be…

Saoirse Ronan has spoken out in support of her Little Women director Greta Gerwig after she was snubbed by the Golden Globes.

Earlier this week, the nominees for the 2020 Golden Globes were announced, revealing that the battle for Best Director would be between Bong Joon-ho for Parasite, Sam Mendes for 1917, Todd Phillips for Joker, Martin Scorsese for The Irishman, and Quentin Tarantino for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

Social media users were outraged by the lack of female directors and highlighted the work of Gerwig, Alma Har’el, who helmed Honey Boy, and Marielle Heller, who directed Tom Hanks in A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.

And Ronan has now shared her disappointment at the lack of recognition for the 36-year-old filmmaker, joining her Little Women co-star Laura Dern in voicing her concern at the inequality in Hollywood.

“She has made one of the best movies of the year,” she told the Today show. “Laura made a really good point yesterday in that in a way it’s sort of vital for something like this to happen, because it reminds us of how far, obviously, we still need to go.”

Gerwig, who scooped a Best Director Oscar nomination for her 2017 movie Lady Bird, which also starred Ronan, has yet to comment on the snub. But the 25-year-old actress was full of praise for her friend and director.

“She is a really brilliant filmmaker. We wouldn’t be here without her. Our performances rely so much on one another, but Greta is the one who brought us all together, and she’s the mastermind of the whole thing,” Ronan gushed.

The 2020 Golden Globes will take place on 5 January.

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Charlize Theron blasts ‘frustrating’ Golden Globes for overlooking female directors

Charlize Theron has voiced her disappointment over the lack of female directors nominated for the 2020 Golden Globes.The Best Director category is dominated by men this year, despite impressive films made by Greta Gerwig, Alma Har’el, and Marielle Hell…

Charlize Theron has voiced her disappointment over the lack of female directors nominated for the 2020 Golden Globes.

The Best Director category is dominated by men this year, despite impressive films made by Greta Gerwig, Alma Har’el, and Marielle Heller, among others.

Accordingly, in an interview with The Los Angeles Times following the announcement of the nominees on Monday, Charlize stated that she finds the omission of talented women “really frustrating”.

“It’s tough. It’s really, really tough. And I think it gets really frustrating when we have to remember that women directors, especially, are just trying to get their numbers up,” the 44-year-old, who picked up a Best Actress nod for her role in Bombshell, explained.

“They represent 10 per cent of our directors in the industry, and when you have a good year like we had this year with such great work, it is incredibly frustrating. No woman wants to get nominated because it’s the right thing to do. It’s really, really ridiculous.”

Just five women have ever been nominated for Best Director in the Golden Globes’ 77-year history, with Barbra Streisand the only winner.

However, the president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Lorenzo Soria, has defended the organisation’s decision not to honour women directors at the 2020 Golden Globes and insisted films should be judged on merit and not gender.

“What happened is that we don’t vote by gender,” he told Variety. “We vote by film and accomplishment.”

The filmmakers nominated in the Best Director – Motion Picture category include Bong Joon Ho for Parasite, Sam Mendes for 1917, Todd Phillips for Joker, Martin Scorsese for The Irishman, and Quentin Tarantino for Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

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Alma Har’el calls Golden Globes voters ‘out of touch’ for snubbing female directors

Honey Boy director Alma Har’el has branded Golden Globes voters “out of touch” for failing to nominate any women in the directing and screenwriting categories.Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) officials came under fire on Monday when the nomin…

Honey Boy director Alma Har’el has branded Golden Globes voters “out of touch” for failing to nominate any women in the directing and screenwriting categories.

Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) officials came under fire on Monday when the nominations for the 2020 Golden Globes were announced, revealing that no women had been recognised in the directing and screenwriting categories.

Har’el, who directed Shia LaBeouf’s recent biographical film, spoke to Variety a short time later and called the voting body “out of touch”.

“It’s obvious they have no awareness at all,” she said. “They’re immersed in this perpetuated activity of basking in male excellence and overseeing this whole new world we’re trying to build with new voices of women and people of colour being part of the conversation… They don’t pay attention to new voices or value them in the same way they value men they are familiar with.

“There were so many films this year that connected with audiences and critics as well as performed at the box office, and this group is out of touch and doesn’t see any of us. Zero women scriptwriters. Zero best films by women. Zero women directors nominated. I will not live my life as a filmmaker who plans to keep working subjected to a group of voters that doesn’t see us.”

Har’el, who called for the creation of a separate female director category, gave a shoutout to her fellow filmmakers, including Greta Gerwig, Olivia Wilde, and Lorene Scafaria, on Twitter after the nominations were announced and told her followers, “These are not our people and they do not represent us. Do not look for justice in the awards system.”

“I take your love over awards any day of the year. I wouldn’t trade the film we made for any other film on any other awards list,” she added.

In its 77-year history, just five female directors have been nominated for Golden Globes, with only Barbra Streisand winning for 1984’s Yentl. In response to the backlash, HFPA president Lorenzo Soria issued a statement insisting, “We don’t vote by gender. We vote by film and accomplishment.”

The 2020 Golden Globes will take place on 5 January.

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Shia LaBeouf came up with Honey Boy script while undergoing treatment for PTSD

Shia LaBeouf dreamed up the idea for his acclaimed screenwriting debut Honey Boy while undergoing treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The actor was sent to a rehab facility after he was arrested for public drunkenness, disorderly conduc…

Shia LaBeouf dreamed up the idea for his acclaimed screenwriting debut Honey Boy while undergoing treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The actor was sent to a rehab facility after he was arrested for public drunkenness, disorderly conduct and obstruction in Georgia back in 2017, and was ordered to enrol in anger management counselling and complete a drug and alcohol evaluation after pleading no contest to disorderly conduct.

And it was while he was being treated for PTSD that he came up with the idea for his autobiographical new film.

During an appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show on Tuesday, the Transformers star revealed he finished the script in just two months and was prompted to end a long estrangement with his father.

“They sent me to this place and they said, ‘You’ve got PTSD and we’ve got a solution’,” Shia explained. “We started doing this stuff, called exposure therapy, and through that process, recording all these conversations, this is where the movie came from.

“I wrote the first chunk (of the script) in this head camp… and when I got home I hadn’t seen my dad in seven years and my director, Alma Har’el, who is a wizard, she’s like, ‘You need to go see your dad’, so I then I went and saw my dad and recorded that, came home, had the ending, wrestled it down and that was the process.”

Shia screened the film for his father and set up a webcam to see how he reacted to the depiction of his difficult and sometimes abusive relationship with his son.

“I wasn’t gonna ask him (if he liked it)… because he could have folded me if he said said something off-colour and he’s an off-colour character,” LaBeouf added. “I basically had them set up a web camera and I watched him watch the whole movie. He didn’t say much, but I know he felt like I saw really him, like I got him… It’s a love letter. It felt that way.”

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