Ang Lee used footage from Bad Boys to help de-age Will Smith in Gemini Man

Ang Lee used footage from Bad Boys to help de-age Will Smith in his new movie, Gemini Man.The action thriller, which also stars Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Clive Owen, sees Smith play an older hitman who is targeted by a younger clone of himself. Now,…

Ang Lee used footage from Bad Boys to help de-age Will Smith in his new movie, Gemini Man.

The action thriller, which also stars Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Clive Owen, sees Smith play an older hitman who is targeted by a younger clone of himself.

Now, Lee has revealed that to create a convincing younger-looking Smith, his visual effects team used photos of the actor, as well as the 50-year-old’s work in films such as 1993’s Six Degrees of Separation and Bad Boys, which was released in 1995.

However, the Oscar-winning director explained that while they eventually successfully created Smith’s doppelganger with enormous technological investment and footage from his early movies, they were unable to use the funnyman’s work in his ’90s TV sitcom, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air.

“He wasn’t playing this kind of part,” Lee told Variety. “He played a swaggering, happy-go-lucky guy and here he’s kind of a melancholy fellow.”

The ground-breaking Gemini Man features high frame rates – 60 frames per second to 120 frames per second – and 3D filmmaking, which the 64-year-old previously used in his 2016 drama, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk.

But the movie, starring Joe Alwyn and Kristen Stewart, was panned by critics, and some movie theatres in the U.S. were unable to screen the film because of the high frame rates.

“It was quite brutal,” Lee sadly explained. “It wasn’t given a fair shot really.”

He went on to suggest that Sony, the studio behind the film, didn’t fully support the new technology. “They didn’t know what to do with that movie,” he continued. “They had mixed feelings.”

Gemini Man is due to hit cinemas in October.

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Quentin Tarantino and Martin Scorsese sign open letter calling for reversal of Oscar changes

Filmmakers including Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee have written an open letter to the Academy calling on them to reinstate the Oscars categories they’ve relegated to the ad breaks. On Monday (11Feb19), John Bailey, President of the …

Filmmakers including Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee have written an open letter to the Academy calling on them to reinstate the Oscars categories they’ve relegated to the ad breaks.

On Monday (11Feb19), John Bailey, President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences (AMPAS), announced that the winners of the Cinematography, Film Editing, Makeup and Hairstyling and Live Action Short categories would be presented with their Oscars during the commercial breaks and an edited version of their winning moment would be aired later in the broadcast.

The decision sparked outrage from members of the film industry who took to social media to condemn it, and now a group of filmmakers has come together to write a letter stating that “it’s not too late to have this decision reversed”.

“Relegating these essential cinematic crafts to lesser status in this 91st Academy Awards ceremony is nothing less than an insult to those of us who have devoted our lives and passions to our chosen profession,” they wrote in the letter, which was published on film outlets on Wednesday.

“Since its inception, the Academy Awards telecast has been altered over time to keep the format fresh, but never by sacrificing the integrity of the Academy’s original mission,” they continued. “When the recognition of those responsible for the creation of outstanding cinema is being diminished by the very institution whose purpose it is to protect it, then we are no longer upholding the spirit of the Academy’s promise to celebrate film as a collaborative art form.”

The letter was signed by more than 40 filmmakers, with directors such as La La Land’s Damien Chazelle, Cary Joji Fukunaga, Spike Jonze, Ang Lee, Dee Rees, and Seth Rogen, and Oscar-winning cinematographers Roger Deakins and Emmanuel Lubezki adding their names to it.

On Wednesday, a letter was sent from the AMPAS’ board of governors to members in which they cleared up “inaccurate reporting” and insisted that “no award category at the 91st Oscars ceremony will be presented in a manner that depicts the achievements of its nominees and winners as less than any others.”

They confirmed that all awards would be presented during the Los Angeles ceremony on 24 February, but those four would not be broadcast live to help streamline the show.

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Tom Cruise makes appearance at movie awards to honour Mission: Impossible director

Tom Cruise made a rare awards show appearance at the Advanced Imaging Society (AIS) Awards on Wednesday (30Jan19) to present his Mission: Impossible collaborator Christopher McQuarrie with an honorary prize.According to editors at The Hollywood Reporte…

Tom Cruise made a rare awards show appearance at the Advanced Imaging Society (AIS) Awards on Wednesday (30Jan19) to present his Mission: Impossible collaborator Christopher McQuarrie with an honorary prize.

According to editors at The Hollywood Reporter, Cruise was a guest presenter at the 10th AIS Awards at the Steven J. Ross Theater at the Warner Bros. Studios in Los Angeles, where McQuarrie was presented with the Harold Lloyd Award for achievement in filmmaking.

The 56-year-old action star praised the director of Mission: Impossible – Fallout, which took $780 million (£593 million) at the global box office, who he said “applies cutting edge technology beautifully” and “like Harold Lloyd, respects the audience … and understands that story is everything.”

The actor also didn’t go home empty-handed, as he and McQuarrie also accepted the trophy for best scene or sequence, for the acclaimed 2018 movie’s white-knuckle helicopter chase sequence.

In his acceptance speech, McQuarrie thanked New Zealand for being “the only country that would let us shoot the helicopter sequence”, and was similarly generous in praise of his leading man.

“Our single greatest piece of technology is Tom Cruise,” gushed McQuarrie. “I have an unfair advantage. Whatever we come up with, Tom’s response is ‘Yeah, I’ll do that. How are you going to shoot it?’ That sets in motion the development of new technology.”

McQuarrie, who wrote the screenplay for The Usual Suspects, has collaborated with Cruise on Valkyrie, Jack Reacher and the latest two Mission: Impossible movies, Rogue Nation and Fallout, and they are working on two more instalments to be released in 2021 and 2022.

Meanwhile, other movies recognised for their cutting-edge technology included Ready Player One, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, Black Panther, which was recognised for best immersive feature, and Bradley Cooper-directed film A Star Is Born, which won an award for creative use of high dynamic range (HDR) in a live-action feature.

Previous recipients of the Harold Lloyd award, named after one of the greatest stars of the silent movie era, include directors Martin Scorsese, James Cameron, and Ang Lee.

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Michelle Yeoh filmed Crouching Tiger after knee surgery

Michelle Yeoh had to work through the pain while filming Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon after undergoing knee surgery following her first action sequence. The actress reveals she spent much of Ang Lee’s movie in a leg brace, and filming never stopped. …

Michelle Yeoh had to work through the pain while filming Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon after undergoing knee surgery following her first action sequence.

The actress reveals she spent much of Ang Lee’s movie in a leg brace, and filming never stopped.

“I was working with a brace until I was fit enough to do the final action sequence,” the Crazy Rich Asians star said during a recent SAG Conversations interview. “I would have my leg up on a wooden stool so you couldn’t see it but you would see all my upper hand movements.”

And Michelle fears her dedication made it tough for Lee’s leading ladies that followed her: “I remember Ang Lee moved onto Brokeback Mountain and they were doing the sledding scene and poor Michelle Williams tore her ACL,” she explained. “He turned around to her and said, ‘Yeah, Michelle did an action sequence after she got hurt. Why are you not?'”

The former Bond girl has been carrying out her own stunts for years, crediting her dedication to ballet as a child for allowing her to take on roles even stunt doubles struggled with, but she admits one on the movie Supercop, opposite Jackie Chan, almost ended her life.

“I had to roll over the van and hit the car that Jackie is going to pull up on and then just hold on…,” she recalled. “It was a six or seven-foot drop from the van to Jackie’s car.

“Everything that could have gone wrong, went wrong – I land on the car and the glass that was supposed to crack so Jackie could get me did not crack, so I’m sliding off the car. There was another stuntman who jumped off the truck to try and catch me but at the speed we were going he landed and had a concussion (and went) straight to the hospital.

“Nobody thought to say cut; we just kept going along. I could hear Jackie, who is very protective of me because I’m like his sister saying, ‘Cut! Cut! Finish for the day!’ I was so lucky that I landed on my butt, sliding off the car onto the tarmac instead of my head because that would’ve been the end.”

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The Shining, Jurassic Park and Brokeback Mountain enter National Film Registry

Movies including The Shining, Jurassic Park and Brokeback Mountain have been selected for preservation by officials at the U.S. National Film Registry. Each year, 25 films are selected by executives of the Library of Congress to be added to the regist…

Movies including The Shining, Jurassic Park and Brokeback Mountain have been selected for preservation by officials at the U.S. National Film Registry.

Each year, 25 films are selected by executives of the Library of Congress to be added to the registry for being “culturally, historically or aesthetically” important and at least 10 years old.

The 30th annual list was released on Wednesday (12Dec18), and it included Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror The Shining, which starred Jack Nicholson, and Steven Spielberg’s 1993 dinosaur classic, which starred Sam Neill, Laura Dern and Jeff Goldblum.

Ang Lee’s Brokeback Mountain, which portrays a love story between two cowboys played by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal, was also selected. It was only released in 2005, making it the youngest-ever entry on the registry.

“To my great surprise, the film ended up striking a deep chord with audiences,” Lee said in a statement. “The movie became a part of the culture, a reflection of the darkness and light, of violent prejudice and enduring love in the rocky landscape of the American heart.”

Other additions include 1935 movie The Informer, giving director John Ford the most entries on the list with 11, Alfred Hitchcock’s first American feature Rebecca, Disney’s 1950 animation Cinderella, 1987’s Broadcast News, Gene Kelly and Frank Sinatra movie On The Town, and 1964’s My Fair Lady, starring Audrey Hepburn.

“The National Film Registry turns 30 this year, and for those three decades, we have been recognising, celebrating and preserving this distinctive medium,” Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden said. “These cinematic treasures must be protected, because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

Other entries include Orson Welles’ The Lady From Shanghai, Leave Her to Heaven, Days of Wine and Roses, The Navigator, Eve’s Bayou, Smoke Signals, Hair Piece: A Film for Nappy-Headed People, Hearts and Minds, One-Eyed Jacks, Pickup on South Street, documentary Monterey Pop, and 1898 29-second movie Something Good – Negro Kiss.

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