Naomi Campbell happy to finally see racial diversity in fashion

Naomi Campbell is happy to see an increase in racial diversity in the fashion industry.The supermodel discussed Black representation during an appearance on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen, and revealed she’s hopeful a new direction is coming. …

Naomi Campbell is happy to see an increase in racial diversity in the fashion industry.

The supermodel discussed Black representation during an appearance on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen, and revealed she’s hopeful a new direction is coming.

“It needs to change from the board room to the seat. It needs to go right from the top through,” Naomi shared. “I’ve been saying this for years, and so I’m truly grateful and happy, finally, this is happening.”

The 50-year-old British beauty also discussed U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour’s recent comments on diversity, following the death of George Floyd back in May, and said she was hopeful of an overhaul at the famed publication.

“I think things are about to change, don’t you?” Campbell said. “Things are about to change. Everyone used to think that you liked being the token black person in the room. It’s absolutely the opposite. I never did.”

Despite her optimism, Naomi expressed her sorrow that it took Floyd’s death, at the hands of a white police officer, and a number of other unarmed members of the Black community, to prompt huge changes after millions took to the streets as part of the Black Lives Matter movement.

“The way that it’s had to come out, for people to lose their lives, it’s very sad and my condolences to each and every one of those victims, (and) parents of those people that have gone,” she added. “But this had to happen. This change had to happen.”

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Andre Leon Talley slams ‘racist’ fashion industry

Andre Leon Talley said he has “bottled up” his frustration at the racism in the fashion industry over the years.The former U.S. Vogue editor-at-large discussed his experience of racial inequality during a candid interview with U.K. news show Good Morni…

Andre Leon Talley said he has “bottled up” his frustration at the racism in the fashion industry over the years.

The former U.S. Vogue editor-at-large discussed his experience of racial inequality during a candid interview with U.K. news show Good Morning Britain, and said that while working in the world of fashion can be glamorous, it’s “as cutthroat as any other industry”.

“I’ve always been aware of the injustice against people of colour… I was aware of racism, it didn’t happen to me until I got to Paris, where I was applauded and received beautifully by the great giants of fashion – Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy and Karl Lagerfeld,” he explained, before claiming he was accused of having affairs with designers by his former boss.

“I found it a very racist statement so I was always aware that as a Black man sitting on the front row of fashion at a very young age, I was there because I was smart, I have degrees, I have my credentials in order.”

He went on to reveal that he was “quietly bottling up” racism until he was fired by Anna Wintour as U.S. Vogue’s Met Gala red carpet correspondent in 2018.

“It came out when I suddenly found Anna Wintour taking me off a job at Vogue and never explaining to me why I was removed from the job,” he recalled, before stating the editor-in-chief removed him from the role because of his weight.

“When I started my career I was very thin and now I have weight issues and I’m very, very obese and I think Anna Wintour decided I had lived through my days and she never explained it.”

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Kanye West shows off new pink hair

Kanye West has gone back to pink hair.The rapper first tried the bright hue in 2018, not long after his wife Kim Kardashian also tested the bubblegum shade.He showed off his newly dyed hair in a video on Twitter. In it, a smiling Kanye is joined by his…

Kanye West has gone back to pink hair.

The rapper first tried the bright hue in 2018, not long after his wife Kim Kardashian also tested the bubblegum shade.

He showed off his newly dyed hair in a video on Twitter. In it, a smiling Kanye is joined by his friend Dave Chappelle and other associates.

Dave flew out to Wyoming, where Kanye is holed up in his ranch after kicking off his bid to become the next president of America, to check on his pal after the Stronger rapper worried fans with his emotional appearance at a campaign rally over the weekend.

Kanye told the crowd he and Kim had almost aborted their first born, daughter North. He then appeared to have a Twitter meltdown, and claimed his wife was trying to “lock him up”.

In the video with Dave, the 43-year-old, who was sporting the futuristic Foam Runner sneakers from his Yeezy label with a hot pink hoodie and orange sweatpants, appeared happy and relaxed.

During his recent Twitter tirade, which he has since deleted, Kanye also revealed details about his Yeezy collaboration with Gap.

“Anna Wintour always showed me love but when I told her I was going to GAP she looked at me like I was crazy Then she called back kissing my ass,” he told his 30.2 million followers.

“Shia (LaBeouf) was deposed to do the first YZY GAP shoot and he never showed up.”

And he spoke about the Gap partnership, worth a reported $1 billion, at his campaign rally in South Carolina, on Sunday, though his comments caused share prices to plummet.

“In risk or no risk of losing whatever deal possible, I am not on the board at Adidas. I am not on the board at Gap,” he said, according to the New York Post. “And that has to change today, or I walk away.”

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Naomi Campbell: ‘Conde Nast are developing a Vogue Africa magazine’

Naomi Campbell has claimed Conde Nast are in the process of developing a Vogue Africa magazine. The 50-year-old has long been championing the publishing house to launch an African edition of the fashion bible, which has 23 international editions, and …

Naomi Campbell has claimed Conde Nast are in the process of developing a Vogue Africa magazine.

The 50-year-old has long been championing the publishing house to launch an African edition of the fashion bible, which has 23 international editions, and in an interview with Reuters on Monday, she revealed a plan was in motion.

She said she has had conversations with people at the media company and has “come to understand that Conde Nast are working on bringing a Vogue Africa,” and it was being “looked into to be developed” before the killing of George Floyd by police sparked worldwide Black Lives Matter protests.

Responding to her comments, a spokesperson for Conde Nast told Reuters that it does not comment on future business ventures and is continuously working on the expansion of its brands globally.

The Black Lives Matter protests against racial injustice and inequality have been raging worldwide in recent weeks, causing many companies to examine the diversity in their workplace and vow to do better to have a more inclusive and representative workforce.

In recent weeks, both Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch and artistic director Anna Wintour, also U.S. Vogue’s editor-in-chief, have admitted that the company and magazine have not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity.

Naomi, who has been in the fashion industry for 34 years, believes the movement will create job opportunities for Black designers, stylists, and make-up artists and products which cater to a wider range of consumers.

“Now the whole world is on the same page. The voices are coming out now… and I look at that with optimism that we will get our change,” she said.

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Conde Nast pledges to improve diversity after intense criticism

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling…

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.

The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling down” efforts to create “positive social change”.

“It shouldn’t take the horrendous murder of innocent people like George Floyd to make us wake up as a society, but now we need to listen, learn and take quick action to be a positive force as an industry,” Lynch said during the media presentation, according to WWD.

“I’m sure many of you have been watching how this passion for creating positive social change in the world led us to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a company, too. We’re doubling down on work we’ve already been doing to build a culture that prioritises diversity and inclusion,” he added.

His pledges included hiring a new global chief diversity and inclusion officer which will “help to ensure equitable representation within our content across print, digital and video,” and also vowed to hire more people of colour.

Lynch also promised to put together an external diversity council which would work alongside content teams.

Magazines owned by Conde Nast have come under fire since the Black Lives Matter movement urged change after the death of Floyd at the hands of white police officers last month.

U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief and Conde artistic director Anna Wintour has been targeted recently, following her admission that she allowed “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at the fashion bible.

And monthly American food publication Bon Appetit was called out after a photograph of former editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport emerged of him in brown face, and allegations of racially discriminatory behaviour.

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Beverly Johnson calls on Anna Wintour to address ‘structural exclusion’ at U.S. Vogue

Beverly Johnson has urged Anna Wintour to address a “culture of structural exclusion” at U.S. Vogue.Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minne…

Beverly Johnson has urged Anna Wintour to address a “culture of structural exclusion” at U.S. Vogue.

Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers in late May, Wintour issued a candid statement to her staff at the fashion magazine earlier this month in which she expressed her regret over not doing enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure.

But in a new op-ed published in The Washington Post on Wednesday, Johnson – who became the first African-American model to appear on the cover of U.S. Vogue back in 1974 – has insisted the editor-in-chief needs to do more to promote black talent at the publication as well as within her role as artistic director of publishing giant Conde Nast.

“Anna Wintour, who has been the editor in chief of Vogue for over 30 years and is currently the doyenne of Conde Nast, admitted last week to a culture of structural exclusion at Vogue and across the fashion industry. Wow – after three decades, fashion’s leading arbiter has finally acknowledged that there may be a problem!” she wrote. “Wintour is arguably the most powerful person in the world of fashion. Wintour’s power would ostensibly allow her to hold her peers in fashion accountable for making structural changes.”

Accordingly, Johnson went on to propose Wintour and her colleagues adopt the ‘Beverly Johnson Rule’ in which it will be required for executives to interview a diverse range of candidates for all positions within the firm.

“This rule would be especially relevant to boards of directors, C-suite executives, top editorial positions and other influential roles. I also invite chief executives of companies in the fashion, beauty and media industries to adopt this rule,” the 67-year-old stated.

To conclude her piece, Johnson insisted she will continue fighting against the racism and exclusion that have been “an ugly part of the beauty business for far too long”.

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Andre Leon Talley slams Anna Wintour’s diversity statement as ‘white privilege’

Andre Leon Talley has slammed Anna Wintour’s diversity statement to her staff at U.S Vogue as “white privilege”.The editor-in-chief acknowledged in a memo to staff earlier this week that she had not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity duri…

Andre Leon Talley has slammed Anna Wintour’s diversity statement to her staff at U.S Vogue as “white privilege”.

The editor-in-chief acknowledged in a memo to staff earlier this week that she had not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure at the fashion publication.

Wintour admitted that “it can’t be easy to be a black employee at Vogue,” and insisted that she would be looking to educate her team on systemic racism.

However, Talley was unimpressed with the 70-year-old’s message to her staff, and called out her “white privilege” during an interview with Sandra Bernhard on her Sandyland radio show.

“The statement that she made, you know, the world of white privilege is complicated,” the former U.S. Vogue editor-at-large stated. “The statement came out of the space of white privilege.

“I wanna say one thing, Dame Anna Wintour is a colonial broad, she’s a colonial dame. She comes from British, she’s part of an environment of colonialism,” he fired. “I do not think she will ever let anything get in the way of her white privilege.”

Talley, who documented his tumultuous relationship with Wintour in his new memoir, The Chiffon Trenches, also claimed that his former friend was affected by Harper’s Bazaar hiring its first black editor-in-chief, Samira Nasr.

“That is news, groundbreaking,” Talley explained. “This has impacted (Wintour), clearly that statement comes because this girl is going to run competition rings around her, her power base has been somewhat affected by the competition of this young African-American presence who is going to be historically the first black female editor of a great, great magazine.”

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Anna Wintour admits to ‘hurtful and intolerant’ behaviour at U.S. Vogue

Anna Wintour has admitted to allowing “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at U.S. Vogue.Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota…

Anna Wintour has admitted to allowing “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at U.S. Vogue.

Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers on 25 May, the fashion magazine’s editor-in-chief has issued a candid statement to her staff in which she expressed her regret over not doing enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure.

“I want to say plainly that I know Vogue has not found enough ways to elevate and give space to Black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creators. We have made mistakes too, publishing images or stories that have been hurtful or intolerant. I take full responsibility for those mistakes,” the note, obtained by the New York Post’s Page Six, reads. “It can’t be easy to be a Black employee at Vogue, and there are too few of you. I know that it is not enough to say we will do better, but we will – and please know that I value your voices and responses as we move forward.”

Wintour went on to insist she would be looking to educate her team on systemic racism and called on her employees to reach out to her personally with their input. She also indicated that bosses at Vogue’s publisher, Conde Nast, would be making financial donations in support of anti-racism groups.

“This is a historic and heartbreaking moment for our country and it should be a time of listening, reflection, and humility for those of us in positions of privilege and authority. It should also be a time of action and commitments. On a corporate level, work is being done to support organisations in a real way,” the 70-year-old added.

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Anna Wintour: ‘The 2019 Met Gala was the happiest I can remember’

Anna Wintour has described the 2019 Met Gala as one of the “happiest”.Famous faces who attend the prestigious fashion event, held annually on the first Monday in May, are given a theme to adhere to, which is based on the exhibition staged at The Costum…

Anna Wintour has described the 2019 Met Gala as one of the “happiest”.

Famous faces who attend the prestigious fashion event, held annually on the first Monday in May, are given a theme to adhere to, which is based on the exhibition staged at The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Last year, the theme was Camp: Notes on Fashion, and in a new interview with Billy Porter for The Hollywood Reporter, the U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief recalled it being one of the best experiences she can remember as all of the guests felt so free.

“Each Met Gala responds to what the exhibition subject is. Some have been a little bit more stiff, like when we did (Charles James: Beyond Fashion) or more aggressive, when we did (Punk: Chaos to Couture),” Wintour explained. “It all depends on what the exhibition is. Camp was the happiest night that I can remember in all the years because I think people just so enjoyed themselves, enjoyed dressing up and not having any sense of, ‘Do I look right?’ It was, ‘This is who I am.’ Everybody had a smile on their face.”

And Wintour also defended the use of the word ‘camp,’ which has previously been used as a derogatory description of gay people.

“If you look at the history of what the word means, it means that things that are a little bit off – rather than the way that I think some people think of it. Camp is celebration of self-expression,” the 70-year-old commented, noting that the exhibition itself – curated by Andrew Bolton – was a celebration. “What we all wanted to celebrate in that exhibition is that you need to be who you are, and nobody should tell you anything else… It was beautiful.”

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Anna Wintour concerned fashion industry will ‘lose talent’ due to coronavirus pandemic

Anna Wintour is worried the fashion industry “will lose a lot of talent” amid the Covid-19 pandemic.In a new interview with Billy Porter for The Hollywood Reporter, the U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief candidly spoke about what she believes will happen in th…

Anna Wintour is worried the fashion industry “will lose a lot of talent” amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

In a new interview with Billy Porter for The Hollywood Reporter, the U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief candidly spoke about what she believes will happen in the business after the coronavirus outbreak wanes.

“Like so many industries, (the pandemic) has been devastating for the fashion community,” she began. “But, I honestly think that we’re going to lose a lot of talent. A lot of people are going to lose their businesses.”

Wintour went on to explain that she foresees fashion slowing down, with sustainability set to become a major focus for designers.

“There will be a real sense that creativity is important. That clothes, accessories, everything that the fashion community stands for should not be thought of as disposable. (Customers) will want to invest money – that they’re going to have less of – in things that are meaningful to them,” the 70-year-old continued, before predicting that there will soon be less emphasis on “what’s new” and more on “craft and creativity”.

Wintour was also asked about the involvement of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and Vogue Fund in helping to combat the ongoing struggles faced by emerging designers and smaller labels trying to stay afloat during the crisis.

“We are giving out grants to young people, young businesses in our communities that are most in need,” she stated.

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