Robert Downey Jr. defends wearing blackface in Tropic Thunder

Robert Downey Jr. accepted his controversial role in Tropic Thunder to call out the “insane self-involved hypocrisy” of fellow actors.Ben Stiller’s 2008 satirical comedy follows a group of actors who are making a Vietnam War movie, and the Iron Man sta…

Robert Downey Jr. accepted his controversial role in Tropic Thunder to call out the “insane self-involved hypocrisy” of fellow actors.

Ben Stiller’s 2008 satirical comedy follows a group of actors who are making a Vietnam War movie, and the Iron Man star wore blackface to play Australian method actor Kirk Lazarus, who underwent “pigmentation alteration” surgery to play a fictional African-American soldier.

It caused an outcry when it was released more than 10 years ago, and in a recent interview on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast, Robert confessed he was originally concerned about accepting the role.

“When Ben called and said, ‘Hey I’m doing this thing’ – you know I think Sean Penn had passed on it or something. Possibly wisely. And I thought, ‘Yeah, I’ll do that and I’ll do that after Iron Man.’ Then I started thinking, ‘This is a terrible idea, wait a minute,'” he explained.

He told host Joe that he listened to his heart, and while he was looking forward to “being black” for a summer, he wanted to use the role of Kirk Lazarus to call out “self-involved” actors.

“The other thing is, I get to hold up to nature the insane self-involved hypocrisy of artists and what they think they’re allowed to do on occasion, just my opinion,” he shared.

However, the 54-year-old insisted he understood those who took issue with the controversial character.

“Ninety per cent of my black friends were like, ‘Dude, that was great’… I can’t disagree with (the other 10 per cent), but I know where my heart lies,” he added. “I think that it’s never an excuse to do something that’s out of place and out of its time, but to me it was a blasting cap on (the issue).

“Sometimes, you just gotta go, ‘Yeah I effed up.’ In my defence, Tropic Thunder is about how wrong (blackface) is, so I take exception.”

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Jennifer Aniston will wear her Stuart Weitzman wedges ‘until they are beyond repair’

Jennifer Aniston intends to wear her classic Stuart Weitzman wedges “until they are beyond repair”.The 50-year-old Friends star has been wearing the designer’s Alex Swamp Espadrille shoes since 2009 and has paired the $415 (£335) wedge with outfits su…

Jennifer Aniston intends to wear her classic Stuart Weitzman wedges “until they are beyond repair”.

The 50-year-old Friends star has been wearing the designer’s Alex Swamp Espadrille shoes since 2009 and has paired the $415 (£335) wedge with outfits such as a white slip dress, denim shorts and bootcut jeans over the years.

“I like a wedge. I’m currently switching between Burberry, Saint Laurent, and my old-school Stuart Weitzmans that I will wear until they are beyond repair,” she said during an interview with InStyle magazine.

She also picked her two favourite red carpet looks from her decades-long Hollywood career and revealed she would love to wear them again.

“Both are Valentino Haute Couture: the black gown with a high slit that I wore to the 2010 Golden Globes and the silver mini from the premiere of Love Happens (in 2009),” Jennifer shared.

Elsewhere in the interview, the Murder Mystery star confessed to binge-watching Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s sitcom Fleabag and admitted she would love to work with her close friend Ben Stiller again after they starred opposite each other on the 2004 romantic comedy Along Came Polly.

“(It) is up there as one of my fondest movie-making experiences,” she gushed.

Jennifer also listed her top beauty picks and shared she is “obsessed” with Tom Ford eyeshadows, wears Jennifer Meyer’s $2,750 (£2,215) hammered gold hoops on a daily basis, and swears by Jillian Dempsey’s Khol Eyeliner, $20 (£16).

The Hollywood beauty also uses Melanie Simon’s ZIIP Device, a palm-size skincare device that stimulates collagen and elastin by pushing electricity into the skin.

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Ben Stiller dislikes acting in his directorial projects

Ben Stiller dislikes directing himself because he finds it “painful” watching his performance back during post-production. After finding success as a comedian, Stiller got his big break in Hollywood directing and starring in the 1994 romantic comedy R…

Ben Stiller dislikes directing himself because he finds it “painful” watching his performance back during post-production.

After finding success as a comedian, Stiller got his big break in Hollywood directing and starring in the 1994 romantic comedy Reality Bites, and has since appeared in all his directorial projects, including Zoolander and Tropic Thunder.

However, he told U.S. late night host Jimmy Kimmel on Tuesday that directing the TV show Escape at Dannemora, which stars Benicio Del Toro as Richard Matt, a convicted murderer who engineers a jailbreak, was much more pleasurable as he didn’t have to worry about his own performance.

“Everything I’ve directed up until now I’ve been in and it was a relief not to have to deal with me,” Stiller explained. “When you go to edit, and you have to look at yourself… it’s painful.”

The 53-year-old also revealed his excitement at working with Del Toro and his co-star, Patricia Arquette, who plays a prison worker Matt was romantically involved with and aided his escape, saying they are “such good actors”.

The Showtime series, which is based on a real 2015 escape from Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, New York, is nominated for seven Primetime Emmy Awards, and is a favourite to win several prizes at the ceremony next month.

Stiller is nominated for the Directing – Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special prize, Del Toro and Arquette both bagged leading acting in a limited series nods, and Paul Dano, who pays Matt’s co-escapee David Sweat, received supporting actor recognition.

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Ryan Reynolds remembers John Candy 25 years after his death

Ryan Reynolds has remembered “comedic genius” John Candy – 25 years after the larger than life actor died.Candy was one of cinema’s biggest stars in the ‘80s and early ‘90s, starring in classics like Planes, Trains & Automobiles, Cool Runnings …

Ryan Reynolds has remembered “comedic genius” John Candy – 25 years after the larger than life actor died.

Candy was one of cinema’s biggest stars in the ‘80s and early ‘90s, starring in classics like Planes, Trains & Automobiles, Cool Runnings and Uncle Buck.

He died on 4 March 1994 from a presumed heart attack at the age of 43 and, more than two decades on, Hollywood stars are still in awe of his work.

Saluting his fellow Canadian on Twitter, Reynolds shared: “It’s the 25th anniversary of John Candy’s passing. We cooked up a small tribute to a comedic genius and Canadian hero. If you haven’t seen much of his work, take a look at his films. He was a treasure. Thanks to @chriscandy4u and @therealjencandy (Canadian flag emoji)”, tagging the actor’s children Jennifer and Christopher.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also paid his respects online.

“John Candy made millions of people laugh all over the world, and we still love him for it. What a great tribute to this Canadian legend,” he said, sharing Reynolds’ post.

Others to mark the anniversary of Candy’s passing include Guillermo del Toro and Ben Stiller, who also shared Reynolds’ tribute.

“I love John Candy and Planes, Trains and Automobiles is eternal,” The Shape of Water director posted, while Ben added: “John Candy comedic genius and just like… comedic genius, comedy hero, person I still watch constantly and will always idolize. That’s it. Good job.”

Singer Paul Young, who’s song Everytime You Go Away was used in the tribute clip, also reached out to the Deadpool star after he posted his message remembering the late actor.

“I was so disappointed and deflated when my damn record company wouldn’t let my version be used in Trains, Planes and Automobiles so @VancityReynolds thank you so much for finally using it in this lovely tribute to John!” Young shared, which promoted Reynolds to reply: “This song still punches me in the heart every time. Thank you, Paul.”

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