Zendaya exclusively wore all Black designers for InStyle cover shoot

Zendaya worked exclusively with Black photographers and designers for her latest InStyle cover shoot.The Euphoria star fronts the September issue of the magazine, and revealed she and stylist Law Roach were given creative and editorial control of the s…

Zendaya worked exclusively with Black photographers and designers for her latest InStyle cover shoot.

The Euphoria star fronts the September issue of the magazine, and revealed she and stylist Law Roach were given creative and editorial control of the shoot, and used the opportunity to highlight the work of black creatives.

The duo hired photography duo Ahmad Barber and Donte Maurice, and the 23-year-old rocked outfits designed by Jason Rembert, Christopher John Rogers, Cushnie, and Pyer Moss.

“I’ve always had a Black stylist and Black hair and make-up artists, but we were able to work with two talented young Black photographers on this shoot too,” Zendaya told Black Lives Matter co-founder Patrisse Cullors for the cover interview. “We’re actually around the same age, so it was cool to be with my peers and have an opportunity to show what we can do.”

And the Spider-Man: Far From Home star hopes that featuring the Black creatives for the highly-publicised cover will give her collaborators a sales boost.

“There are also so many Black designers people don’t know about, so having an opportunity where they can be in InStyle and get the love they deserve is really special,” Zendaya explained. “I hope people are like, ‘Oh, I like that dress!’ – and then go support them.”

Stylist Law also took to Instagram to share his joy at being given full control of the shoot by InStyle bosses.

“No rules! No advertisers! You allowed me a BLACK stylists to creative direct an editorial with my beautiful BLACK muse Zendaya and feature clothing from all BLACK designers, shoes from all BLACK shoe designers, jewels from all BLACK jewelry designers, we feature BLACK art from BLACK artists,” he shared.

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Hailey Bieber outlines how she’ll teach future children about racism

Hailey Bieber is planning on teaching her future children important lessons about racism early on.The 23-year-old model married Justin Bieber in a secret ceremony in 2018 after a whirlwind romance.Posing for the cover of the latest issue of Vogue India…

Hailey Bieber is planning on teaching her future children important lessons about racism early on.

The 23-year-old model married Justin Bieber in a secret ceremony in 2018 after a whirlwind romance.

Posing for the cover of the latest issue of Vogue India, Hailey opened up about her and 26-year-old Justin’s plans for a family, and how they’ll raise their kids.

Talking about her recent Instagram posts supporting the Black Lives Matter movement, she explained: “It was time to look inside and reflect: what do I not know, what do I need to ask, how can I step up and do the best that I can to be an ally in the Black Lives Matter movement?

“(My children) will be raised knowing how to treat people, why we don’t say certain things, and why we respect and acknowledge and give credit where credit is due.”

She also touched on her own childhood, comparing it to her superstar spouse’s, who found fame at the age of 13 after uploading videos of himself singing to YouTube.

Hailey, the daughter of actor Stephen Baldwin, fell into fashion after a foot injury put a stop to her ballet dreams, and she believes she wasn’t affected by fame as a youngster.

“To be honest, I don’t really think I was ever famous. Of course, I knew my father was an actor and he was famous to an extent, but if I was to compare how I grew up to how Justin did, he’s had a way crazier ‘famous’ experience really young,” she mused. “Whereas I got to grow up and get my driver’s licence and really be normal until the past three years of my life.”

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Adwoa Aboah pushed to ‘breaking point’ by childhood insecurities

Adwoa Aboah has revealed in a searingly honest open letter that her childhood insecurities pushed her to a “dark breaking point” when she found success as a model.The London-born fashion star didn’t hold back in her letter, which has been published in …

Adwoa Aboah has revealed in a searingly honest open letter that her childhood insecurities pushed her to a “dark breaking point” when she found success as a model.

The London-born fashion star didn’t hold back in her letter, which has been published in Elle magazine.

Adwoa, who also graces the cover of the glossy publication, explained how she couldn’t silence old insecurities about her worth, even when she reached the big time.

“I’d watch from the sidelines as certain friends flourished in social situations, all carefree and glowing, while I quietly hid my insecurities and internalised my shame,” she explained of her school years. “I, like many others before and after me, never felt as though I fit in. I wasn’t white enough, nor was I Black enough. Boys weren’t into my braids, so I conformed – painfully relaxing my hair, which didn’t win them over either.”

Later in the essay, she wrote: “When I started receiving more attention and external validation, I hoped these superficial markers could carry me through. If I can just put on a façade and keep the messy feelings inside, I thought, they’ll magically disappear. Instead, they followed me into adulthood, compounding over time and pushing me to a dark breaking point.”

Adwoa, 28, is one of fashion’s most in-demand models, but she admitted she didn’t know how to speak up about the issues she was dealing with.

She’s now hoping to inspire a new generation, and praised people’s strength and resilience in the wake of a global pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement.

“You have been unapologetic and fearless leaders in the quest for equality and have stood up for the most marginalised communities, demonstrating that, indeed, All Black Lives Matter,” she gushed.

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Maria Grazia Chiuri discusses diversity after casting criticism

Maria Grazia Chiuri is happy doing her part in bringing about positive change, but is realistic that she can’t change the world.The Dior designer drew some criticism after debuting the Le Mythe Dior film to accompany her recent couture collection, whic…

Maria Grazia Chiuri is happy doing her part in bringing about positive change, but is realistic that she can’t change the world.

The Dior designer drew some criticism after debuting the Le Mythe Dior film to accompany her recent couture collection, which featured a white cast.

Talking about the Black Lives Matter movement, Chiuri assured Grazia that she takes the issue of diversity very seriously.

“The strange thing is that I’m very sensitive to these issues, even before Covid,” she said. “I’m very happy that we speak about these problems. But it is also evident that these problems have a long history. I can’t believe that only with this pandemic situation we start now to wake up.

“And I think a lot of people who were scared to use their voice start to use their voice. That is good. Sometimes people attack me to say, ‘You are a political designer’. Everybody is political. If you are human, you are political. Nobody is perfect, but we have to try to make something. I don’t think I can change the world, but I can do a little part. If everybody thinks they can do a little part all together, probably we can create a better place to live.”

The film followed the magical story of nymphs and goddesses in an enchanted wood, and the Italian designer stands by her casting for that particular film.

“For me, I think diversity is important but it depends on the situation and the reference,” she mused. “If I do another film, I probably make another casting.”

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Miranda Kerr: ‘Racism does not have a place in our society’

Miranda Kerr has pledged to support the Black community through her beauty brand KORA Organics.The 37-year-old model launched the line in 2009 with the help of organic chemists, aromatherapists, and formulators from her native Australia.She is now lend…

Miranda Kerr has pledged to support the Black community through her beauty brand KORA Organics.

The 37-year-old model launched the line in 2009 with the help of organic chemists, aromatherapists, and formulators from her native Australia.

She is now lending KORA’s social media platform to Black voices, so they can inspire growth and change in the community.

“This has been an incredibly tumultuous time for our country, and I stand with the Black community and those fighting for equality and justice. As a businesswoman I know it’s my responsibility to take action through KORA, where we stand together in solidarity against racism and injustice,” she told Ocean Drive magazine.

“We will continue to speak up and stand up for one another. As protests have taken place across the U.S. and all over the world, I think many of us have paused and taken time to reflect, educate ourselves and listen to those speaking out. There is no place for racism of any kind in our society and we cannot turn a blind eye when it is so obviously prevalent.”

She added now is the time for people to speak up and show their support, and that she believes everyone is capable of empathy and compassion.

“We are being called to apply those inherent qualities to make a difference for the Black community,” the mother-of-three continued. “The protests have brought the Black Lives Matter movement to the forefront of conversations in a way that has never been so universally embraced. And, my hope is that the actions we are taking now can effect real, meaningful change for the future.”

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Olivier Rousteing celebrated Black Lives Matter with Balmain’s Seine river show

Olivier Rousteing made sure the Black Lives Matter movement was represented in Balmain’s river cruise show on Sunday.Kicking off Paris’ Digital Couture Week with #BalmainSurSeine, the label head gave Parisians a fashion show to remember over the weeken…

Olivier Rousteing made sure the Black Lives Matter movement was represented in Balmain’s river cruise show on Sunday.

Kicking off Paris’ Digital Couture Week with #BalmainSurSeine, the label head gave Parisians a fashion show to remember over the weekend, sailing a boat down the river Seine which celebrated Balmain’s work over the decades.

As well as images of past collections, Rousteing called on singer Yseult and the same cast of Black dancers who performed in his fall 20 show back in January.

“Renewed calls for justice and equality – heard on streets all across the world today – are in reaction to tragic losses, but their growing strength and force allow us to dream of the possibilities of long-delayed changes, pushed forward by a newly energised and impressive mix of young, determined and diverse voices,” he said in a statement. “Today’s dance draws inspiration from this moment and our shared longing for actual progress.

“(My optimism for future change) a reflection of my own personal history – after all, it was not too long ago that someone like me was never meant to end up in the position that I occupy today. I love that I work for a house that supports me and has joined with me in pushing for inclusion and changes from the very first day that I began working here.”

The event, which was live-streamed on TikTok, also marked the end of the Covid-19 lockdown.

Calling the past season “a dark one”, Rousteing talked about the effects isolation has had on the people of his home city.

“Forced apart, we suddenly realised that we depended on being together. Locked inside, we longed for the beauty of the outside public spaces of our hometown, Paris. And, faced with the unending reports of unbelievable losses, we came to truly understand the transformative power of solidarity,” he shared.

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Naomi Campbell: ‘Conde Nast are developing a Vogue Africa magazine’

Naomi Campbell has claimed Conde Nast are in the process of developing a Vogue Africa magazine. The 50-year-old has long been championing the publishing house to launch an African edition of the fashion bible, which has 23 international editions, and …

Naomi Campbell has claimed Conde Nast are in the process of developing a Vogue Africa magazine.

The 50-year-old has long been championing the publishing house to launch an African edition of the fashion bible, which has 23 international editions, and in an interview with Reuters on Monday, she revealed a plan was in motion.

She said she has had conversations with people at the media company and has “come to understand that Conde Nast are working on bringing a Vogue Africa,” and it was being “looked into to be developed” before the killing of George Floyd by police sparked worldwide Black Lives Matter protests.

Responding to her comments, a spokesperson for Conde Nast told Reuters that it does not comment on future business ventures and is continuously working on the expansion of its brands globally.

The Black Lives Matter protests against racial injustice and inequality have been raging worldwide in recent weeks, causing many companies to examine the diversity in their workplace and vow to do better to have a more inclusive and representative workforce.

In recent weeks, both Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch and artistic director Anna Wintour, also U.S. Vogue’s editor-in-chief, have admitted that the company and magazine have not done enough to promote diversity and inclusivity.

Naomi, who has been in the fashion industry for 34 years, believes the movement will create job opportunities for Black designers, stylists, and make-up artists and products which cater to a wider range of consumers.

“Now the whole world is on the same page. The voices are coming out now… and I look at that with optimism that we will get our change,” she said.

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Adwoa Aboah refuses to stay silent on stigmatised issues

Adwoa Aboah refuses to “stay silent” because she feels “obligated” to share her personal story with others.The model-and-activist has spoken openly about her experiences through her online organisation Gurls Talk and launched the digital initia…

Adwoa Aboah refuses to “stay silent” because she feels “obligated” to share her personal story with others.

The model-and-activist has spoken openly about her experiences through her online organisation Gurls Talk and launched the digital initiative #CopingTogether last month.

Adwoa, who has worked closely with fashion houses such as Chanel, Dior and Marc Jacobs, hopes the current Black Lives Matter movement will be just the start of change around the world.

“It’s become quite natural to me to speak my truth and talk about subjects that are stigmatised or people find to be taboo,” Adwoa said in an interview with Essence. “I’m not staying silent in general, whether it be talking about mental health or my own story, because I really, truly feel obligated to do it.”

The model hopes #CopingTogether will inspire people to openly discuss what is going on globally at the moment and bring about change for the better.

“I feel ready to make the changes and be part of this new normality. I don’t want to go back to the way it was – in any sense of the word,” she explained.

While Adwoa feels passionately about how she wants to live her life in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement, she admits to having doubts and insecurities during these challenging times.

“I switch back and forth from me being in quite a negative head space and feeling like I’m not sure what the next steps are,” the model shared when asked how it feels to be a Black creative at the moment, “and knowing what I want and the changes that I want to see made, but feeling quite overwhelmed by the process and the steps that need to be taken for that to happen…

“(The pandemic) has made me look at how you want to live each day. Not that this is kind of a surprise with the revolution and what’s happening, this was part of our daily lives and we were completely aware of it.”

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Munroe Bergdorf wants fashion industry to inspire discussions about society

Munroe Bergdorf believes fashion is a “great medium” for “difficult” discussions about society.The 32-year-old star became L’Oreal’s first transgender model in 2017, and after being dropped by the beauty giant for speaking out against racism, was recen…

Munroe Bergdorf believes fashion is a “great medium” for “difficult” discussions about society.

The 32-year-old star became L’Oreal’s first transgender model in 2017, and after being dropped by the beauty giant for speaking out against racism, was recently invited back to join the company’s UK Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Board.

Munroe hopes the industry continues to spark debates and inspire conversations about pressing issues in the world today.

“I see fashion and beauty as great mediums to have often difficult discussions about identity and society,” she told WWD.com. “I’ve always been a creative person, so my journey into activism has been more of a natural progression rather than a conscious choice. I don’t really see myself as an artist, I see myself as a voice for the underrepresented and, hopefully, a symbol of resilience…

“Through my activism I want to encourage all young people to stand up for themselves, to be politically engaged and to educate themselves on issues beyond their own lived experiences.”

Munroe also spoke about the current challenges faced by the Black LGBTQ community. She is hoping the Black Lives Matter movement continues to raise awareness and that Black transgender women can one day live free from prejudice.

“Black transgender women are navigating four pandemics right now: COVID-19, racism, transphobia and misogyny,” Munroe said. “I hope that the #blacklivesmatter movement continues to extend to the Black trans community. I want society to recognise our humanity, to offer us opportunity, to keep us safe and encourage us to live authentically. Too many Black trans women are being murdered and often without justice. We need this violent narrative to end.”

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Conde Nast pledges to improve diversity after intense criticism

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling…

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.

The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling down” efforts to create “positive social change”.

“It shouldn’t take the horrendous murder of innocent people like George Floyd to make us wake up as a society, but now we need to listen, learn and take quick action to be a positive force as an industry,” Lynch said during the media presentation, according to WWD.

“I’m sure many of you have been watching how this passion for creating positive social change in the world led us to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a company, too. We’re doubling down on work we’ve already been doing to build a culture that prioritises diversity and inclusion,” he added.

His pledges included hiring a new global chief diversity and inclusion officer which will “help to ensure equitable representation within our content across print, digital and video,” and also vowed to hire more people of colour.

Lynch also promised to put together an external diversity council which would work alongside content teams.

Magazines owned by Conde Nast have come under fire since the Black Lives Matter movement urged change after the death of Floyd at the hands of white police officers last month.

U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief and Conde artistic director Anna Wintour has been targeted recently, following her admission that she allowed “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at the fashion bible.

And monthly American food publication Bon Appetit was called out after a photograph of former editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport emerged of him in brown face, and allegations of racially discriminatory behaviour.

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