Luca Guadagnino to direct Scarface reboot

Luca Guadagnino has signed on to direct a reboot of Scarface.According to editors at Variety, the Italian filmmaker has been in negotiations with executives at Universal Pictures to helm a new version of the gangster movie.Guadagnino has not yet commen…

Luca Guadagnino has signed on to direct a reboot of Scarface.

According to editors at Variety, the Italian filmmaker has been in negotiations with executives at Universal Pictures to helm a new version of the gangster movie.

Guadagnino has not yet commented on the news, but by taking up the project, Guadagnino will be the third director to tell the story of Scarface, which has become an iconic Hollywood crime story.

Loosely based on the life of Al Capone, an immigrant who builds a criminal empire, the first Scarface film was released in 1932.

The flick was then famously remade in 1983 by Brian De Palma, starring Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer, Steven Bauer, and Robert Loggia.

While the original version of the film was set in Chicago, and the ’80s rendition in Miami, Guadagnino’s reboot is tipped to be located in Los Angeles.

The project will be new territory for the 48-year-old, who is known for his work on films such as the Academy Award-winning Call Me by Your Name, 2009’s I Am Love, and his numerous collaborations with Tilda Swinton.

Guadagnino is the latest in a string of names attached to the project, with a revised Scarface script, initially written by David Ayer, circulating in Hollywood since 2011.

Subsequently, David Yates and Antoine Fuqua have both been in line to direct the film, but departed before production was ever in motion.

The movie’s screenplay has been worked on by Gareth Dunnet-Alcocer, Jonathan Herman, Paul Attanasio, with recent workshopping by Joel and Ethan Coen.

A potential release date has not yet been announced.

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Brian De Palma refused to make more Mission: Impossible movies

Brian De Palma turned down Tom Cruise’s offer to make more Mission: Impossible movies because he thought one was enough. The Scarface director helmed the first Mission: Impossible movie, which became a global box office hit in 1996, and Cruise, who st…

Brian De Palma turned down Tom Cruise’s offer to make more Mission: Impossible movies because he thought one was enough.

The Scarface director helmed the first Mission: Impossible movie, which became a global box office hit in 1996, and Cruise, who starred as Ethan Hunt in the film, soon asked him to start working on a follow-up. However, De Palma turned him down.

“Stories, they keep making them longer and longer only for economic reasons,” De Palma said to The Associated Press. “After I made Mission: Impossible, Tom asked me to start working on the next one. I said, ‘Are you kidding? One of these is enough. Why would anybody want to make another one?’ Of course, the reason they make another one is to make money. I was never a movie director to make money, which is the big problem of Hollywood. That’s the corruption of Hollywood.”

However, the Carrie filmmaker still has fond memories of making the movies.

“In my mid-50s doing Carlito’s Way and then Mission: Impossible, it doesn’t get much better than that,” the 79-year-old praised. “You have all the power and tools at your disposal. When you have the Hollywood system working for you, you can do some remarkable things. But as your movies become less successful, it gets harder to hold on to the power and you have to start making compromises… If you have a couple of good decades, that’s good, that’s great.”

Despite De Palma’s belief that Mission: Impossible should have remained one film, it is a long-running franchise and the seventh and eighth instalments are currently in the works. After he turned down Cruise, Mission: Impossible 2 was directed by John Woo before J.J. Abrams and Brad Bird helmed a film each. The franchise has been in the hands of Christopher McQuarrie ever since the fifth film, Rogue Nation, in 2015.

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Moviemaker Brian De Palma no longer feels part of Hollywood

Movie legend Brian De Palma has tired of Hollywood’s blockbusters, insisting there’s no more room for serious movies. The writer/director, who is responsible for hits like Scarface, Carrie, Carlito’s Way, and The Untouchables, had a stab at making big…

Movie legend Brian De Palma has tired of Hollywood’s blockbusters, insisting there’s no more room for serious movies.

The writer/director, who is responsible for hits like Scarface, Carrie, Carlito’s Way, and The Untouchables, had a stab at making big budget films like Mission to Mars and Mission: Impossible, but decided those weren’t the movies he wanted to make, so he took a step back from Hollywood.

“If you haven’t made a blockbuster, it’s really difficult to make another movie…,” De Palma tells Le Parisien. “I couldn’t have made Casualties of War if I hadn’t made The Untouchables.

“Hollywood has changed. Movies about dinosaurs and superheroes are made for the kids! You cannot make a serious movie over there… unless you’re Spielberg and you “are” the studio.

“After Mission: Impossible, when Tom Cruise said he wanted to make another one, I said to him, ‘Are you kidding me? Why would I want to make another movie like this?’ After that, I made Snake Eyes, Mission to Mars and I said, ‘Stop’. I was fed up with these big movies, when you have to fight with the studios to know how much special effects will cost.”

Brian has returned to directing after a six-year absence and admits his new film, Domino, wasn’t the most pleasant experience, because he had to squabble with producers.

“It was an awful experience,” he tells the outlet. “The movie was underfunded (and) there were a lot of delays… I don’t even know if this movie will be launched.”

But he’s still proud of the project, which features Game of Thrones stars Nikolaj Coster-Waldau and Carice van Houten and Guy Pearce, adding, “I like this movie, it’s good.”

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