Daniel Craig fakes driving scenes in Bond movies

Daniel Craig has admitted he fakes his driving scenes in the James Bond movies.The 51-year-old, who is set to play the British spy for the final time in the upcoming 007 movie No Time to Die, has claimed safety standards in Hollywood have changed since…

Daniel Craig has admitted he fakes his driving scenes in the James Bond movies.

The 51-year-old, who is set to play the British spy for the final time in the upcoming 007 movie No Time to Die, has claimed safety standards in Hollywood have changed since Steve McQueen’s iconic car chase scene in Bullitt back in 1968, and stunt drivers now do most of the work.

In an interview with Top Gear magazine, Daniel made the surprise confession when he was asked how he has perfected his body language during driving scenes in all five of his Bond films.

“You know we fake it, don’t you?” he stated. “The only person who didn’t fake it was Steve McQueen. We’re not allowed to do that anymore, although I do go driving.”

Daniel revealed he was allowed to drive an Aston Martin DB5, which has appeared in the Bond movies since Goldfinger in 1964, and even managed to perform some tricks in the vehicle.

“I was allowed to donut the DB5 in Matera (Italy), which was great,” the actor gushed, adding that he was grateful for the “brilliant bunch” of experts who taught him how to master his body language behind the wheel of the car.

Elsewhere in the interview, Daniel noted that he was “emotional” when finishing filming No Time to Die, and revealed his plan to tie in his final outing as Bond back to his debut as the MI6 agent in 2006’s Casino Royale.

“I’m just immensely proud of the whole thing, of the five movies. The Bond ecosystem is unique,” he shared. “I always had in the back of my mind a story I wanted to tell, and it kind of happened.

“(No Time to Die) movie is about tying all those ends up, about reconnecting him to Casino, really, and that’s what we’ve managed to do.”

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Steve McQueen’s estate sues Tom Ford over namesake sweater

Steve McQueen’s estate has sued Tom Ford for $1 million (£765,715) over a cardigan that is being marketed under the actor’s name.The Bullitt star’s son, Chadwick McQueen, has accused the designer of improperly trading on his father’s image and trade…

Steve McQueen’s estate has sued Tom Ford for $1 million (£765,715) over a cardigan that is being marketed under the actor’s name.

The Bullitt star’s son, Chadwick McQueen, has accused the designer of improperly trading on his father’s image and trademarks by using his name to market the garment – dubbed the McQueen Cardigan – which retails for up to $2,390 (£1,838).

At the height of his popularity in the 1970s, the actor was considered one of Hollywood’s most stylish stars, and is often credited for the revival of the cardigan.

Chadwick, who maintains his father’s trust, argued that the style of wool cardigan with a shawl collar is one of the “sartorial items that in fact became synonymous with McQueen,” and went on to call the late actor “king of the cardigan.”

While the Papillon star’s estate has occasionally licensed the McQueen name for commercial use, including for a current deal with Barbour for outerwear, they claimed that Tom Ford “refused” their request to stop the use of the name related to the sweaters.

In the complaint, Chadwick’s lawyer wrote that the celebrated American designer was unfairly benefiting from the star’s name and stature, and claimed that his estate is due a share of the profits from the item.

“By unfairly benefiting from the public attention and exclusivity that would have accompanied an authorised relationship with the McQueen family, defendants have deprived the family of the commensurate compensation for use of the Steve McQueen name and likeness,” the complaint suggested.

A spokesperson declined WWD’s request for comment on the pending litigation, citing company policy, but they insisted: “We look forward to vigorously defending our rights.”

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A Clockwork Orange title designer Pablo Ferro dies aged 83

Pablo Ferro, famed for his iconic title design work on movies such as A Clockwork Orange and Bullitt, has died at the age of 83.The Cuban-American award-winning designer died of complications from pneumonia on Friday (15Nov18) in Sedona, Arizona, his f…

Pablo Ferro, famed for his iconic title design work on movies such as A Clockwork Orange and Bullitt, has died at the age of 83.

The Cuban-American award-winning designer died of complications from pneumonia on Friday (15Nov18) in Sedona, Arizona, his family confirmed, according to editors at The Hollywood Reporter.

Ferro, a self-taught artist whose signature style incorporated montage-like title sequences, creative stylistic typefaces, and quick-cut editing, worked on over 100 films including Stanley Kubrick classics A Clockwork Orange and Dr. Strangelove, Steve McQueen’s Bullitt, Men In Black, and The Thomas Crown Affair (1968), and served as a supervising editor on the music video for Michael Jackson’s 1983 hit Beat It.

Ferro, who was raised on his grandfather’s farm in Cuba, moved to New York City with his family when he was 12. He began his career in design in the mid-’50s, working with Disney animator Vladimir ‘Bill’ Tytla, who became his mentor.

He was also a contemporary of late Marvel founder Stan Lee, working with him early in his career on a series of sci-fi and adventure comics.

In the ’60s he and fellow artists Fred Mogubgub and Lew Schwartz launched their own company, creating visuals for advertising campaigns, before he got the call from Kubrick which kick-started his career in Hollywood.

Ferro’s work in title design has appeared in a dozen Academy Award-winning movies including Philadelphia and Good Will Hunting, and has also won him numerous Clio awards for creative excellence in advertising, design and communication, and a DGA Excellence in Film Award.

He later went on to create Pablo Ferro Films, served as a creative consultant on Hal Ashby’s 1983 Rolling Stones concert film Let’s Spend the Night Together and directed his own 1992 feature Me Myself and I, starring George Segal and JoBeth Williams.

The designer is survived by his former wife, Susan, as well as his children Joy Ferro-Moore and Allen Ferro.

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