Renee Zellweger still overcome with emotion over landing Jerry Maguire role

Renee Zellweger will never forget the moment Cameron Crowe told her she had won a part in Jerry Maguire.The actress, who played Dorothy Boyd in the 1996 drama, opened up about the movie during a recent SAG-AFTRA Conversations event, and recalled how sh…

Renee Zellweger will never forget the moment Cameron Crowe told her she had won a part in Jerry Maguire.

The actress, who played Dorothy Boyd in the 1996 drama, opened up about the movie during a recent SAG-AFTRA Conversations event, and recalled how she was attending a film premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah with her parents and brother when director Crowe called with the surprise job offer.

“It didn’t really seem like a possibility for me. I wanted to do a good job for Cameron when I met him. He just felt kindred to me right away… We loved the same things,” she shared.

“The fact that I was on the list (for the role) was hilarious to me. It had been a while since my audition, and I was at Sundance Film Festival for The Whole Wide World premiere. My mom and dad came. The phone rang and Cameron said, ‘Hey Z, it was really great to hang out and get to meet you. I mean, thank you’.

“I’m like, ‘Hurry up and break my heart already!’ Then he said, ‘I was just wondering… maybe you want the part?’ The next day there was an announcement in Variety and my brother, who was at Sundance with us, came back with a stack of them (magazines). I could cry just thinking about it.”

And to top it all off, Crowe gave her one of the most famous lines in romantic comedy history – “You had me at hello” – which she says to her on-screen love interest, Tom Cruise.

“When people say to me, ‘You had me at hello’, to me it still touches me,” the 50-year-old smiled. “What a cool thing that somebody gives you a line like that.”

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Ashton Kutcher: ‘I was fired from Elizabethtown so director could hire Orlando Bloom’

Ashton Kutcher believes he was let go from the 2005 movie Elizabethtown so the director could hire his first choice, Orlando Bloom.The 41-year-old actor was originally tapped to star alongside Kirsten Dunst as Drew Baylor in the 2005 romantic comedy, b…

Ashton Kutcher believes he was let go from the 2005 movie Elizabethtown so the director could hire his first choice, Orlando Bloom.

The 41-year-old actor was originally tapped to star alongside Kirsten Dunst as Drew Baylor in the 2005 romantic comedy, but was let go in favour of Orlando part way into filming.

Opening up about the dismissal during a segment on First We Feast’s YouTube series Hot Ones, set to debut on Thursday, the star confessed he was “fired” from the role – and suggested director Cameron Crowe always wanted The Lord of the Rings actor as his leading man.

“Yeah, I’ll say fired, sure. (Cameron) originally wanted Orlando Bloom for Elizabethtown and Orlando Bloom was working on a Ridley Scott picture, and wasn’t available,” Ashton shared. “So I went (to) audition, he cast me and then we started working on it.

“I think he wanted to see the character rehearsals all the way, and I probably wasn’t disciplined enough as an actor to get myself to a point where I was able to do that and show it to him in a way that he felt comfortable.”

However, he went on to insist the decision to drop out of the role was mutual, adding: “At a certain point we just kind of agreed that it wasn’t working out. More him than me… Also, I found out at the same time that Orlando Bloom had just become available right when he was gonna let me go.”

The actor had previously told IGN that he wasn’t fired and that the film simply conflicted with his commitment to TV series That ’70s Show, while the filmmaker told The Hollywood Reporter in 2011: “At a certain point, it’s like, ‘This is not meant to be’… It felt like a noble crusade.”

Elizabethtown also starred Susan Sarandon, Alec Baldwin, Jessica Biel, and Judy Greer.

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Filmmaker forced to cut David Crosby’s liver transplant tale out of documentary

The filmmaker behind rock veteran David Crosby’s new documentary, Remember My Name, had so much great material he had to cut footage of the star talking about his 1994 liver transplant. The surgery was funded by Crosby’s friend and collaborator Phil C…

The filmmaker behind rock veteran David Crosby’s new documentary, Remember My Name, had so much great material he had to cut footage of the star talking about his 1994 liver transplant.

The surgery was funded by Crosby’s friend and collaborator Phil Collins, and the Crosby, Stills & Nash musician opened up about the health drama and his gratitude towards the former Genesis star, but director A.J. Eaton had to cut it.

Producer Cameron Crowe, who is a longtime friend of Crosby’s, told WENN, “With Crosby, there is so much life. To cover it in 90 minutes, you end up having the most absurd conversations you can imagine in the editing room. You’re like, ‘Well, we don’t even have room for the liver!'”

Talking about the surgery, and Collins’s generous gesture, in a new interview, Crosby stated, “He (Collins) loves me. That’s the only way you can read it. And I think it was incredibly kind of him to do it.”

Crowe also admitted that he once thought Crosby was close to death’s door after meeting him backstage at a concert 20 years ago when he was recovering from the transplant and battling diabetes and hepatitis. The producer felt sure the chat would be their last, but the singer/songwriter has survived the odds and is now healthier than ever.

The filmmaker, who first interviewed Crosby when he was a teenager, explained: “I wrote in my journal, ‘This might be the last time I’m going to see David Crosby alive.’ Many people have had that kind of experience.

“I can tell you from having seen Crosby a couple weeks ago, he’s got more energy than anybody I know – including my kids!”

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