Anna Wintour: ‘The 2019 Met Gala was the happiest I can remember’

Anna Wintour has described the 2019 Met Gala as one of the “happiest”.Famous faces who attend the prestigious fashion event, held annually on the first Monday in May, are given a theme to adhere to, which is based on the exhibition staged at The Costum…

Anna Wintour has described the 2019 Met Gala as one of the “happiest”.

Famous faces who attend the prestigious fashion event, held annually on the first Monday in May, are given a theme to adhere to, which is based on the exhibition staged at The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Last year, the theme was Camp: Notes on Fashion, and in a new interview with Billy Porter for The Hollywood Reporter, the U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief recalled it being one of the best experiences she can remember as all of the guests felt so free.

“Each Met Gala responds to what the exhibition subject is. Some have been a little bit more stiff, like when we did (Charles James: Beyond Fashion) or more aggressive, when we did (Punk: Chaos to Couture),” Wintour explained. “It all depends on what the exhibition is. Camp was the happiest night that I can remember in all the years because I think people just so enjoyed themselves, enjoyed dressing up and not having any sense of, ‘Do I look right?’ It was, ‘This is who I am.’ Everybody had a smile on their face.”

And Wintour also defended the use of the word ‘camp,’ which has previously been used as a derogatory description of gay people.

“If you look at the history of what the word means, it means that things that are a little bit off – rather than the way that I think some people think of it. Camp is celebration of self-expression,” the 70-year-old commented, noting that the exhibition itself – curated by Andrew Bolton – was a celebration. “What we all wanted to celebrate in that exhibition is that you need to be who you are, and nobody should tell you anything else… It was beautiful.”

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Jeremy Scott views camp as glamour mixed with ‘over-the-top humour’

Jeremy Scott has opened up about what camp means to him in the wake of the 2019 Met Gala.Designers took the theme, Camp: Notes on Fashion, and ran with it at this year’s style extravaganza, with celebrities like Katy Perry, Celine Dion and Billy Porter…

Jeremy Scott has opened up about what camp means to him in the wake of the 2019 Met Gala.

Designers took the theme, Camp: Notes on Fashion, and ran with it at this year’s style extravaganza, with celebrities like Katy Perry, Celine Dion and Billy Porter stepping out in spectacular designs.

The concept was taken from Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay of the same name, with an exhibition based around the idea set to open at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on Wednesday, curated by officials at the museum’s Costume Institute.

Talking about how camp informs his own designs, Scott told Interview magazine: “Camp to me means over-the-top humour, usually coupled with big doses of glamour. Like everything, the meaning is defined by context. A lot of what is now camp was dead serious at one time, and vice versa.

“I’ve grown up in a very post-post-modern world-references piled on top of references, decades re-emerged and remixed to define the ones we are living in. I grew up genuinely loving things that were bright and glossy, colourful and full of joy-like Barbie. Her late ’80s pink Corvette lifestyle of big blonde hair, totally pink minidresses, and perpetually perfect accessories are now, in this time, rendered ripe for camp.”

For Monday’s event, Moschino head Scott dressed Stella Maxwell, Sarah Paulson, Bella Hadid, Gwen Stefani, Perry, who’s outfit resembled a chandelier, Tracee Ellis Ross, who was decked out with a giant photo frame attached to the front of her dress, and Kacey Musgraves, who came as a real-life Barbie.

The designer ramped things up even more for the after-party looks, with Roar singer Perry slipping into a Moschino burger costume and Stefani swapping her sexy showgirl outfit for an ultra mini skirt with matching tank top bearing the New York Post’s logo.

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Prabal Gurung details Joan Smalls and Candice Swanepoel’s stunning 2019 Met Gala looks

Prabal Gurung had a busy Met Gala night, making dresses for a range of stars, including models Joan Smalls and Candice Swanepoel.With numerous of his creations taking centre stage at the annual style extravaganza in New York on Monday, Gurung was happy…

Prabal Gurung had a busy Met Gala night, making dresses for a range of stars, including models Joan Smalls and Candice Swanepoel.

With numerous of his creations taking centre stage at the annual style extravaganza in New York on Monday, Gurung was happy to update his Instagram followers with all the details of the looks.

Uploading multiple photos of models Smalls and Swanepoel, the designer explained how he came up with their individual ensembles.

Next to a photo of Smalls, wearing an Atelier Prabal Gurung dress, made up of tulle long sleeve column gown with engineered hand embroidered Tharu tattoo motifs and peacock feather fringe detail, Gurung revealed the inspiration was Tharu women – from the tribe of people nestled in the foothills of his native Nepal.

“(They) provide a new idea on what it means to be a feminist,” he wrote. “Tattooing their bodies as a form of resistance and armour, the Tharu’s exert their strength in an unexpected yet strikingly visual manner that offers a new perspective on empowered dressing.

“The inspiration for @joansmalls Atelier Prabal Gurung gown continues with archival nods to female heroines who possess a special power over their persona – Cher and Josephine Baker- while breaking barriers in performance and in activism.”

For Swanepoel, who embodied the Camp: Notes on Fashion theme in a light blue strapless column gown adorned with 220,000 Swarovski crystals and featuring a celeste silk taffeta tiered bouillon Watteau train, Gurung was inspired by the blonde star’s own personality.

“Candice’s Atelier Prabal Gurung gown is a couture labour of love, a celebration of glamour and a representation of Candice’s bright spirit,” he said.

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Ezra Miller and Keiynan Lonsdale model dresses ahead of Met Museum’s new exhibition

Ezra Miller and Love, Simon actor Keiynan Lonsdale have posed in dresses from The Met Museum’s upcoming 2019 exhibition Camp: Notes on Fashion.Like previous years, the collection will officially be on display following the annual Met Gala, which takes …

Ezra Miller and Love, Simon actor Keiynan Lonsdale have posed in dresses from The Met Museum’s upcoming 2019 exhibition Camp: Notes on Fashion.

Like previous years, the collection will officially be on display following the annual Met Gala, which takes place on 6 May (19), where guests typically take their dress code cue from the museum’s exhibit theme.

Modelling some of the camp pieces, Ezra and Keiynan are joined by model Edie Campbell in an editorial for Vogue.

Both actors are dressed in designs by Thom Browne; Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them actor Ezra in a mash-up of a bride and groom look from the fashion star’s spring 18 line, and Keiynan in a fall 19 outfit, consisting of a tuxedo top and a pleated skirt.

“Everything flips upside down in this theatre of high drama,” Ezra told the fashion glossy.

In a second image, Keiynan dons a powder-pink 18th-century robe a la francaise-inspired dress by Vivienne Westwood, from fall 95.

“It’s so easy to play it safe, but that’s not camp,” the 27-year-old noted.

Sharing the photos on Instagram, he added to his followers: “Thank you @voguemagazine for including me in your 2019 May Issue. I can’t even believe this happened. Thank you with all of my heart.”

Meanwhile, Edie channels bird-like beauty for her image, in a pink and purple feather Moschino gown, from spring 16.

Camp: Notes on Fashion, influenced by American writer Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay Notes on ‘Camp’, runs from 9 May to 8 September at the New York art institution. Dresses by Christian Dior, Balenciaga, Bob Mackie, and Versace will also feature.

In the exhibition overview, museum curators explain: “Through more than 250 objects dating from the 17th century to the present, The Costume Institute’s spring 2019 exhibition will explore the origins of camp’s exuberant aesthetic. Susan Sontag’s 1964 essay Notes on ‘Camp’ provides the framework for the exhibition, which examines how the elements of irony, humour, parody, pastiche, artifice, theatricality, and exaggeration are expressed in fashion.”

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