Anna Wintour: ‘Fashion industry leaders must rethink their values’

Anna Wintour has urged fashion industry leaders to “rethink” their values amid the coronavirus crisis.The U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief participated in a conversation with Naomi Campbell for her No Filter with Naomi series on YouTube on Wednesday, with th…

Anna Wintour has urged fashion industry leaders to “rethink” their values amid the coronavirus crisis.

The U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief participated in a conversation with Naomi Campbell for her No Filter with Naomi series on YouTube on Wednesday, with the pair discussing what the business will look like once the Covid-19 pandemic begins to ease.

Accordingly, Wintour insisted that now is the time for designers, businesspeople, and models to consider how they can become much more sustainable.

“I feel very strongly that when we come out the other end, which we will do, that people’s values are really going to have shifted,” she said. “I think it is an opportunity for all of us to look at our industry and to look at our lives and to rethink our values and to think about the waste, amount of money, and consumption and excess that we’ve all – and I include myself in this – indulged in. We need to rethink what this industry stands for. In that regard, I think it has been a moment when everyone has been taking the time to think about how we should move forward.”

Wintour went on to note that A Common Thread, the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund for Covid-19 relief that she has set up alongside Council of Fashion Designers of America chairman Tom Ford, has already raised $5 million (£4 million) and attracted 850 applicants. She and Ford hope to give away between $10,000 and $100,000 (£8,000 – £80,000) to “as many people as we possibly can”.

Elsewhere in the chat, the editor also reflected on the postponement of the 2020 Met Gala, but did not give an indication as to when exactly the annual fashion event might take place.

“We had to think of the health and safety of everybody. Of course, it’s a magical night and night I care deeply about – we raise a great deal of much-needed funds for the Costume Institute – but we are hopeful that we will be opening the exhibition in October and that people will have the opportunity to see (curator) Andrew Bolton’s incredible work,” the 70-year-old added. “There will be other opportunities for us to all come together.”

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Anna Wintour and Tom Ford launch coronavirus crisis relief fund

Anna Wintour and Tom Ford are gearing up to launch a relief fund for those in the fashion business affected by the coronavirus crisis.The Covid-19 pandemic continues to sweep the globe, with approximately 425,000 confirmed cases and 18,900 deaths. To h…

Anna Wintour and Tom Ford are gearing up to launch a relief fund for those in the fashion business affected by the coronavirus crisis.

The Covid-19 pandemic continues to sweep the globe, with approximately 425,000 confirmed cases and 18,900 deaths. To help those impacted in the design and retail spheres, U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Wintour and Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) chairman Ford have decided to repurpose the CFDA/ Vogue Fashion Fund into a fundraiser.

“Over the last few days, both Tom and I have heard from so many of you about the impact of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic, which we know has affected you both professionally and personally. Not one of us has been left untouched by it,” said Wintour in a statement. “To raise awareness for this new fundraising initiative, we are launching a video series, A Common Thread, which will tell your stories of how you are coping with the impact of Covid-19, how you and your business have been affected, and how you plan to move forward. It will also tell the stories of those you work with behind the scenes – we want to highlight the narratives of everyone who contributes so much to the incredibly strong and vibrant industry that we are all so proud of.”

The video series will be launched on 26 March. Donors can support the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund for Covid-19 relief by texting THREAD to 44-321 in the U.S. or contributing online. The fund is not limited to former Fashion Fund participants or members of the CFDA – applications for funding will be available from 8 April.

The CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund was originally founded in 2003 in response to the September 11 terror attacks in 2001 and how the tragedy impacted emerging talent.

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Anna Wintour praises 2019 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund finalists

Anna Wintour has praised the 10 finalists in the 2019 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund competition as a “true reflection of American fashion”.The editor-in-chief of U.S. Vogue magazine and artistic director of Conde Nast is one of the 11 members on the Selectio…

Anna Wintour has praised the 10 finalists in the 2019 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund competition as a “true reflection of American fashion”.

The editor-in-chief of U.S. Vogue magazine and artistic director of Conde Nast is one of the 11 members on the Selection Committee, who met on Monday to decide on the emerging designers who would compete for the 16th annual prize.

The finalists are Abdul Abasi and Greg Rosborough of Abasi Rosborough; Alejandra Alonso Rojas; Victor Barragan of Barragan; Christopher John Rogers; Hillary Taymour of Collina Strada; Danielle Hirsch of Danielle Frankel; Raffaella Hanley of Lou Dallas; Siying Qu and Haoran Li of Private Policy; Reese Cooper; and Natalie Ratabesi of Tre by Natalie Ratabesi.

Wintour called the finalists “a true reflection of American fashion – and the world – today, speaking to creativity, community, and sustainability.”

“They are following in the footsteps of so many wonderful talents who’ve come before them, and I look forward to seeing what our class of 2019 will do in the months to come,” she added.

The CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund was established in 2003, and past winners include Proenza Schouler, Alexander Wang, Altuzarra, The Elder Statesman, and last year’s champion, Pyer Moss.

Over the course of the next few weeks, the 2019 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Selection Committee – which includes Joseph Altuzarra, Eva Chen, Steven Kolb, and Diane von Furstenberg – will meet with the finalists to interview them, review their work and visit their design studios.

The winner, to be announced at a gala dinner on 4 November in New York City, will receive a prize of $400,000 (£320,000). The two-runners up take home $150,000 (£120,000) each.

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Pyer Moss’ Kerby Jean-Raymond wins 2018 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund

Pyer Moss designer Kerby Jean-Raymond has won the 2018 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund.The fashion star, who launched his brand in 2013 – attracting celebrity fans including Tracee Ellis Ross and Issa Rae – is an outspoken advocate of social justice and makes …

Pyer Moss designer Kerby Jean-Raymond has won the 2018 CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund.

The fashion star, who launched his brand in 2013 – attracting celebrity fans including Tracee Ellis Ross and Issa Rae – is an outspoken advocate of social justice and makes a point to celebrate Black culture with his designs, with his spring 2016 menswear line referencing the Black Lives Matter movement via the use of video and street art.

At a gala hosted by U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour and the CFDA’s Diane von Furstenberg at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in Brooklyn, New York on Monday night (05Nov18), with stars such as Karlie Kloss, La La Anthony, Chanel Iman, Karolina Kurkova and Zac Posen in attendance, it was announced by actress Emily Blunt that Jean-Raymond has won the prestigious CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, taking home $400,000 (£306,000). Emily Adams Bode of Bode and Jonathan Cohen were named runners-up, each receiving $150,000 (£114,000).

“At a time when our world faces so many challenges, I’m impressed by this year’s winners,” Wintour said. “Their work highlights a high degree of creativity and a deep-rooted commitment to the notion of community. They’re not only a credit to the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund as it celebrates its fifteenth anniversary, but also to the optimism and inclusivity of the very best American fashion.”

The CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, established in 2003, helps emerging American design talent find continued success in the business of fashion.

Other finalists in the 2018 competition included Batsheva Hay of Batsheva, Christian Cowan, Danielle Corona of Hunting Season, Rebecca de Ravenel, Matthew Adams Dolan and Scosha Woolridge of Scosha.

CFDA president and chief executive officer Steven Kolb also praised the latest round of competitors and added: “For 15 years, the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund has provided emerging talent with a path to become tomorrow’s American fashion leaders. In the process, we have identified many fashion stars, and created a culture that welcomes and fosters young talent.”

Previous winners of the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund have included Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of Proenza Schouler, Alexander Wang and Joseph Altuzarra of Altuzarra.

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Vogue apologises for styling Kendall Jenner in an ‘Afro’ hairstyle

Editors at U.S. Vogue have apologised for styling Kendall Jenner in what appears to be an Afro hairstyle for a photoshoot. A snap showing the model sporting a floral print dress from Brock Collection and her hair teased into a full halo of curls was u…

Editors at U.S. Vogue have apologised for styling Kendall Jenner in what appears to be an Afro hairstyle for a photoshoot. 

A snap showing the model sporting a floral print dress from Brock Collection and her hair teased into a full halo of curls was uploaded on the fashion publication’s Instagram page over the weekend (20-21Oct18).

However, a number of social media users were angered by the image, with many accusing Vogue editors and photographer Mikael Jansson of cultural appropriation, though a spokesperson for the magazine has now issued a statement to clarify the intent of the shoot.

“The image is meant to be an update of the romantic Edwardian/Gibson Girl hair which suits the period feel of the Brock Collection, and also the big hair of the ’60s and the early ’70s, that puffed-out, teased-out look of those eras,” a representative told E! News. “We apologise if it came across differently than intended, and we certainly did not mean to offend anyone by it.”

The photos were taken as part of an editorial celebrating the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, which was established in 2003 to help emerging American design talent find continued success in the business of fashion.

Kendall also appears in another image in the photoshoot alongside Imaan Hammam, a Dutch model of Egyptian and Moroccan descent, who wore her hair straight.

Many Instagram users flooded the comments section of the post, with a number questioning Kendall’s casting.

“Why didn’t you get someone with an actual Afro and freckles to model for you instead?” one person argued, while another added: “If y’all wanted a model that didn’t look white y’all could’ve booked a girl of colour.”

Kendall has not yet responded to the backlash. But the controversy marks the latest drama for the Keeping Up with the Kardashians star, who faced criticism in April 2017 for her appearance in a controversial Pepsi commercial, as well as a month later, when she fronted a special cover of Vogue India, with readers complaining they would have preferred an Indian celebrity or model in her place.

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