Charlie Hunnam blames ‘miscasting’ for King Arthur flop

Charlie Hunnam believes his 2017 movie King Arthur: Legend of the Sword flopped because a piece of miscasting “crippled” the storyline.The British actor played the titular character in Guy Ritchie’s 2017 fantasy drama, alongside Jude Law, Eric Bana and…

Charlie Hunnam believes his 2017 movie King Arthur: Legend of the Sword flopped because a piece of miscasting “crippled” the storyline.

The British actor played the titular character in Guy Ritchie’s 2017 fantasy drama, alongside Jude Law, Eric Bana and Djimon Hounsou, and the movie was critically panned and bombed at the box office.

During a recent radio interview with Andy Cohen on SiriusXM, Charlie revealed he’d like to revisit the film because the team encountered many problems during production, including a role being miscast.

“I’d like to go back to King Arthur because there’s a lot of things went wrong during that and a lot of things that were out of our control,” he candidly explained. “I just don’t think we ended up matching the aspiration – we just didn’t quite make the movie we wanted.”

When asked what was one of the biggest things to go wrong, the 39-year-old cryptically replied, “There was a piece of miscasting that ended up crippling the central storyline. It’s actually not in the film anymore.”

He didn’t divulge who was miscast in the movie.

Back in 2017, director Guy told Entertainment Weekly that his original cut of the movie was more than three hours long, but was hacked down to just over two hours before its release.

Elsewhere in the interview, the Sons of Anarchy star explained there was a plan to make King Arthur into a franchise if the first film had been a success.

“The idea was that if it was a success, we would’ve made several of those films, and I’m really captivated by the Arthurian legends and I just feel like we really missed an opportunity to tell a long-form story,” Charlie lamented.

The fantasy epic, which cost more than $175 million (£134 million) to produce, made just $146 million (£112 million) worldwide.

© Cover Media

Charlie Hunnam stole outfits from Guy Ritchie’s Bush set

Charlie Hunnam liked the costumes he wore for Guy Ritchie’s new film Bush so much he stole them.The actor stars alongside Colin Farrell and Matthew McConaughey in the transatlantic gangster caper, previously titled Toff Guys, which is due to be relea…

Charlie Hunnam liked the costumes he wore for Guy Ritchie’s new film Bush so much he stole them.

The actor stars alongside Colin Farrell and Matthew McConaughey in the transatlantic gangster caper, previously titled Toff Guys, which is due to be released in 2020.

Charlie and his castmates recently wrapped filming on the movie, and he took some fashionable souvenirs of the shoot with him afterwards.

“I stole some stuff off the last film I did (with Guy),” he told Total Film magazine. “He had me wearing some really snappy outfits, so I pilfered a couple of choice items.”

And he confesses it’s not the first time he’s stolen from the set of a project, as when his TV motorcycle crime drama Sons of Anarchy ended in 2014, he even took a bike with him.

Asked if his set stealing was a regular habit, the 38-year-old added: “Tonnes of s**t. All the time. When Sons (of Anarchy) was finished, I just took everything that wasn’t nailed down. I took the motorbike, my cards, and tonnes of costume.”

One film he was less keen to take his costumes and props away from, however, was Guillermo del Toro’s science-fiction blockbuster Pacific Rim, as the suit he wore as the operator of a giant robot named Jaeger was incredibly uncomfortable.

“I was in this robot wearing this suit that’s very, very heavy and uncomfortable. I spent five weeks in that contraption,” he explained. “Sometimes for 16 hours a day. I always roll my eyes when any actor talks about the difficulty of filming.”

Detailing just how much discomfort the suits and stunts required, he winced: “By the third week when I’d ruptured a couple of discs in my back, which really is no joke, it was incredibly unpleasant.”

© Cover Media

Ben Affleck: ‘I love my giant back tattoo!’

Ben Affleck has insisted he “loves” the giant phoenix tattoo on his back, despite others being less than complimentary about it.The actor was pictured showing off the impressive inking as he enjoyed a swim session at a beach with his Triple Frontier co…

Ben Affleck has insisted he “loves” the giant phoenix tattoo on his back, despite others being less than complimentary about it.

The actor was pictured showing off the impressive inking as he enjoyed a swim session at a beach with his Triple Frontier co-stars Charlie Hunnam, Oscar Isaac, and Garrett Hedlund last year (18) – with the images dividing opinion among fans.

While the majority, including his ex-fiancee Jennifer Lopez, were less than impressed with the huge etching, Ben said during an interview on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, airing on Thursday (14Mar19), that he’s unconcerned by the backlash.

“It’s meaningful to me, I like it. It’s not something I kept private, it wasn’t like I was doing photoshoots – we were sort of two hours north of the city on some island in Hawaii and we didn’t know that the paparazzi was there,” he said. “So, they got a picture of my tattoo, and the sentiment ran against.

“I love my tattoo and I’m very happy with it. Luckily, I’m the one who has it.”

Elsewhere in the interview, Ben spoke about reaching a happy, healthy place in his life, after various stints in rehab centres.

“It’s interesting, it’s sort of – there’s temptation to get depressed if I think, ‘Oh that was hard, and this was hard,’ or I could be kind of embarrassed, but I have to say, I feel so good now, I’m in such a great place, my kids are healthy, you know life is good,” the 46-year-old mused. “So, it’s like, whatever it took for me to get to this place, I’m grateful.”

Ben shares three children with ex-wife Jennifer Garner, and admitted that while their co-parenting sometimes leads to different rules in different houses, the fact their kids are only allowed to watch Ellen’s talk show is something he and his former spouse agree on.

“In split families, you kind of go back and forth and you sort of want to come to an agreement on rules. I’m a little more liberal on the screen side of things, video games and TV, but this is something we can both agree on,” he smiled.

© Cover Media

Charlie Hunnam: ‘Netflix fear is unfounded’

Charlie Hunnam has labelled the debate surrounding Netflix films being considered for Oscars glory “unfounded fear”.English actor Hunnam’s latest project is Netflix flick Triple Frontier, which co-stars Ben Affleck, Oscar Isaac, Garrett Hedlund a…

Charlie Hunnam has labelled the debate surrounding Netflix films being considered for Oscars glory “unfounded fear”.

English actor Hunnam’s latest project is Netflix flick Triple Frontier, which co-stars Ben Affleck, Oscar Isaac, Garrett Hedlund and Pedro Pascal.

And asked his views on the Netflix/ Oscars argument, which has seen Steven Spielberg campaign to get Academy officials to block films made for streaming services, Hunnam predictably voiced his support for the media company.

“My view is yes they should (be eligible) because my experience of making these films is that the aspiration and the work done to create them, to make them, is no different,” he told the Press Association (PA). “But I understand, people have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo if they are on that side of this debate, so I understand why people are quite vocal about it.

“I think it’s fear and whenever you’re in a massively competitive industry there is an element of fear involved in it always but I think it’s unfounded fear.”

The debate was stirred after Alfonso Cuaron’s Netflix-made drama Roma was one of the big winners during awards season.

Kathy Bates recently threw her weight behind Spielberg’s stance, with Kevin Costner also revealing he’s a big fan of theatre releases when it comes to awards recognition.

Continuing his chat with PA, Hunnam added: “I think that the perception of the argument that can be made is that the streaming platforms are going to provide the death blow to the theatrical experience and I personally don’t think that is the case and I don’t think that so far there is any evidence that suggests that is occurring.

“Box office revenues continue to be robust and so I think it is a fear, I just don’t know how founded it is.”

Triple Frontier is available to stream now.

© Cover Media

Charlie Hunnam shed over 30 pounds for Papillon

Rami Malek was “concerned” about his Papillon co-star Charlie Hunnam’s weight loss for their new movie. The Sons of Anarchy star plays a prisoner on a remote island, attempting to escape, in the remake of the Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman movie – a…

Rami Malek was “concerned” about his Papillon co-star Charlie Hunnam’s weight loss for their new movie.

The Sons of Anarchy star plays a prisoner on a remote island, attempting to escape, in the remake of the Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman movie – and to achieve his gaunt look he shed around 35 pounds (16 kilograms).

“I did this two times in a row,” he tells U.S. news show Entertainment Tonight. “I did a film called The Lost City of Z and I lost 40 pounds for that exactly. I went from 185 to 145 exactly. I was down to 145 again for this (role), but I think I probably started at 180 so maybe (I lost), like, 35 pounds.”

While Hunnam is proud he was able to stay dedicated to his weight loss goal, Mr. Robot star Rami admits it was difficult to see his co-star look so skinny.

“Yeah, how can I not be (worried),” he adds. “I mean it’s a very intense experience as it is. Filmmaking, and this one especially, it’s not the glitz and glamour of Hollywood. We weren’t out there going back to our trailers every two seconds.

“(We were) just out there sitting in the mud and hanging out and watching Charlie starve. So, I was a bit concerned, but he’s alright.”

Meanwhile, Charlie, who is known for his muscular physique and shirtless scenes, insists he is not looking to continue to play sex symbol roles.

“It’s certainly not intentional and not something that I want to keep doing, but it seems to be a running theme,” he says. “I don’t know what that’s about.”

© Cover Media