Olga Kurylenko almost died while filming Quantum of Solace boat stunt

Olga Kurylenko has recalled how she almost died while filming a complex stunt for Quantum of Solace.The Ukrainian-French actress played Camille Montes in the 2008 movie, opposite Daniel Craig as suave super spy James Bond, and she revealed that one par…

Olga Kurylenko has recalled how she almost died while filming a complex stunt for Quantum of Solace.

The Ukrainian-French actress played Camille Montes in the 2008 movie, opposite Daniel Craig as suave super spy James Bond, and she revealed that one particular scene, which sees her and Bond fight over control of a small boat while crashing through the waves, was terrifying.

“I remember thinking, ‘Ok, this is the day of my death. I’m going to die today.’ It was so intense, because the thing is, it was real,” she told CinemaBlend. “You would think, ‘Oh this is some sort of computer graphic.’ But no, we were in that boat, and we had that other boat charging straight at us.

“We were basically going towards each other in super, super high speed. Just flying through the water.”

The actress went through a rigorous training regime to prepare her for scene, and while she was originally padded and attached to the boat for safety during practice runs, she began to feel nervous when the time came to shoot the set-piece, as the stunt coordinator urged her to hold on to the boat if she was thrown overboard.

“I was terrified myself, but you have to act. At that point, it’s better than acting, that was all real. There was a real sense of danger, we not pretending we’re scared, and it’s dangerous. We were scared for real,” she shared. “It’s funny to think about it now… those are good memories.”

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Director Mike Flanagan was traumatised after editing Doctor Sleep murder scene

Director Mike Flanagan “wanted to die” after editing a brutal murder scene in Doctor Sleep.The filmmaker helmed the highly-anticipated 2019 sequel to the 1980 horror The Shining, and follows the now-adult Danny Torrance who has to protect a young girl …

Director Mike Flanagan “wanted to die” after editing a brutal murder scene in Doctor Sleep.

The filmmaker helmed the highly-anticipated 2019 sequel to the 1980 horror The Shining, and follows the now-adult Danny Torrance who has to protect a young girl with similar powers from a cult known as The True Knot, who prey on children with extrasensory abilities to remain immortal.

During the horror thriller, Jacob Tremblay’s character Baseball Boy is murdered by the sinister cult, and Flanagan confessed that not only was it the most disturbing scene he’s ever had to edit, but he was left traumatised after having to watch the scene over and over again.

“There was this two-and-a-half day period where we did the first assembly of that, or I’m going through the raw footage and trying to find everything, and it’s just screams,” he told CinemaBlend’s ReelBlend podcast, before adding that he listened to the Katrina and the Waves song Walking on Sunshine to try and mask Jacob’s terrifying screams.

“Not only to drown out the screams for the other offices, but because after a few hours of going through the footage, like, I wanted to die. Just on the edit. Like you guys, the viewer gets to endure that scene for, I think all-in… the whole thing is for four and a half minutes,” Flanagan shared.

And he revealed that he even toyed with the idea of cutting the scene altogether, as he was worried it was too horrifying.

“There was a certain point, we always knew it was there, where if we backed off too far, the scene… its importance in the movie would no longer be there,” he stated.

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Dan Scanlon thrilled Onward is entertaining families at home

Onward director Dan Scanlon is thrilled that his film is giving families “a little moment of joy” amid the coronavirus pandemic.The Disney/Pixar movie follows the story of two elf brothers, voiced by Chris Pratt and Tom Holland, who go on a magical que…

Onward director Dan Scanlon is thrilled that his film is giving families “a little moment of joy” amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Disney/Pixar movie follows the story of two elf brothers, voiced by Chris Pratt and Tom Holland, who go on a magical quest to try and fix a spell so they can bring their late father back to life for 24 hours.

It was released in March, just before cinema chains across the world began closing as the Covid-19 virus spread, forcing people to practice social distancing and stay at home amid government-enforced lockdowns.

Disney bosses decided to release Onward on digital at-home video services early, just two weeks after the start of its theatrical run, and it became available to watch on the company’s streaming service Disney+ on Friday.

While the animation’s box office takings were hugely affected by the early pull from cinemas, director Scanlon is just relieved that audiences are able to enjoy his movie from the comfort of their homes during the global pandemic.

“Clearly, the right thing to do is for everyone to stay in and be safe and take care of themselves,” he told CinemaBlend. “That said, it’s pretty great that folks are getting to see it online and that people are getting to have a little moment of joy, hopefully, or a little distraction with the film.

“And it’s been really wonderful to hear on social media, how much they enjoyed the film, how much they enjoyed getting to watch it with their family. And that it did bring them some joy during this time.”

Films including The Invisible Man, The Hunt, and Emma, which were all showing in cinemas when they closed, were also released on digital services early.

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Quentin Tarantino: ‘Kill Bill was always one movie’

Quentin Tarantino considers his Kill Bill movies to be one film rather than two.The writer and director began filming the star-studded epic, featuring Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, David Carradine, Daryl Hannah and Michael Madsen, back in 2002. The three-hour…

Quentin Tarantino considers his Kill Bill movies to be one film rather than two.

The writer and director began filming the star-studded epic, featuring Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu, David Carradine, Daryl Hannah and Michael Madsen, back in 2002.

The three-hour movie was slated for release in October 2003, however, Tarantino was told by the crew, producer Harvey Weinstein and film studio Miramax to split the film into two parts.

Three months before the full three-hour masterpiece was due to hit cinemas, the director finally decided to cut it into Kill Bill: Volume I and Kill Bill: Volume II, which was later released in 2004.

And in a new interview on the CinemaBlend podcast, the director insisted that Kill Bill is in fact one movie.

“Technically we released it as two movies, and there is a closing and an opening credits (on each movie), but since I made it as one movie and I wrote it as one movie, (it’s one movie),” the Oscar winner shared.

Looking back on his decision, the 56-year-old confessed that the movie does work much better split in half.

“Now it works really good that way. Frankly, the truth of the matter is, I don’t think it would’ve been as popular as a four hour movie. I literally had a guy say that to me. It was one of those weird diamond bullet moments where you can’t unhear it. He said, ‘Quentin, here’s the thing. My uncle would love this movie, but he wouldn’t love it at four hours’,” Tarantino explained.

This helps explain why Tarantino has called his new movie, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, his ninth film, as would be his tenth if you counted Kill Bill as two.

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