CFDA announce 2020 Fashion Award nominees

The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) has released the nominations for the 2020 Fashion Awards, though are forgoing all honouree prizes this year.The shortlist was released on Monday, with The Row designers Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, Drie…

The Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) has released the nominations for the 2020 Fashion Awards, though are forgoing all honouree prizes this year.

The shortlist was released on Monday, with The Row designers Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, Dries Van Noten and Tom Ford all up for multiple awards.

However, executives have decided against some of the awards’ usual categories, including the Geoffrey Beene Lifetime Achievement Award, Fashion Icon and Media Award, among others.

Instead, two new categories have been included; Global Women’s Designer of the Year and Global Men’s Designer of the Year.

Winners will be revealed on the morning of 14 September, kicking off the official New York Fashion Week schedule, after the original date, 8 June, was postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“In this time of unprecedented challenge and change for our industry, we feel very strongly that it is important to recognize the nominees representing the best of fashion creativity,” said Tom Ford, chairman of the CFDA. “We look forward to returning to an in-person celebration honoring the American fashion industry in 2021.”

Steven Kolb, president and chief executive officer of the CFDA, added: “In lieu of the in-person event, we will be prioritising new and existing programming to support our designer community during the global pandemic — by redirecting efforts toward next generation scholarships and making important changes to bring racial equity to the fashion industry. The annual gala serves as our largest fund-raiser, and our hope is to continue raising money to support this work through industry contributions.”

The 2020 CFDA Fashion Award nominees:

American Womenswear Designer of the Year:

Ashley Olsen and Mary-Kate Olsen for The Row

Brandon Maxwell

Gabriela Hearst

Marc Jacobs

Tom Ford

American Menswear Designer of the Year:

Emily Adams Bode for Bode

Kerby Jean-Raymond for Pyer Moss

Thom Browne

Todd Snyder

Tom Ford

American Accessories Designer of the Year:

Ashley Olsen and Mary-Kate Olsen for The Row

Gabriela Hearst

Jennifer Fisher for Jennifer Fisher Jewelry

Stuart Vevers for Coach

Telfar Clemens for Telfar

American Emerging Designer of the Year:

Christopher John Rogers

Kenneth Nicholson

Peter Do

Reese Cooper

Sarah Staudinger

George Augusto for Staud

Global Women’s Designer of the Year:

Daniel Lee for Bottega Veneta

Dries Van Noten

Miuccia Prada for Prada

Pierpaolo Piccioli for Valentino

Rick Owens

Global Men’s Designer of the Year:

Craig Green

Dries Van Noten

Jonathan Anderson for Loewe

Kim Jones for Dior

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton

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CFDA cut New York Fashion Week to three days

Bosses at the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) have made the decision to cut short the upcoming New York Fashion Week.Typically, the biannual event takes place over an eight-day period, with various runways and presentations staged across…

Bosses at the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) have made the decision to cut short the upcoming New York Fashion Week.

Typically, the biannual event takes place over an eight-day period, with various runways and presentations staged across the city.

However, in light of the global coronavirus pandemic, bosses have made the decision to cut the fashion event down to three days.

In a notice sent to members, the spring/summer 21 showcase will run from 14 to 16 September, with the option to add the 17th as a supplement day if the schedule demands it, reports WWD.

The dates for the next NYFW are still officially listed as 11 to 16 September.

However, members have reportedly been told the shorter calendar came about as a result of the “changes we have seen from live events to digital activations, and awareness of city regulations to protect the health and well-being of everyone”.

Some brands, like Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors, have already stated they are skipping the next Fashion Week. For the shows that go ahead, there will be no live audiences.

Discussing the change, Mark Beckham, vice president of marketing and events for CFDA, told the fashion title: “We can fit the same amount of shows in to three days because of no need for travel time in between the shows. The three days of shows is only for this season as a result of Covid-19.”

He further noted the impact of the pandemic on production and budgets “may cause some designers to skip this season”.

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Anna Wintour concerned fashion industry will ‘lose talent’ due to coronavirus pandemic

Anna Wintour is worried the fashion industry “will lose a lot of talent” amid the Covid-19 pandemic.In a new interview with Billy Porter for The Hollywood Reporter, the U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief candidly spoke about what she believes will happen in th…

Anna Wintour is worried the fashion industry “will lose a lot of talent” amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

In a new interview with Billy Porter for The Hollywood Reporter, the U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief candidly spoke about what she believes will happen in the business after the coronavirus outbreak wanes.

“Like so many industries, (the pandemic) has been devastating for the fashion community,” she began. “But, I honestly think that we’re going to lose a lot of talent. A lot of people are going to lose their businesses.”

Wintour went on to explain that she foresees fashion slowing down, with sustainability set to become a major focus for designers.

“There will be a real sense that creativity is important. That clothes, accessories, everything that the fashion community stands for should not be thought of as disposable. (Customers) will want to invest money – that they’re going to have less of – in things that are meaningful to them,” the 70-year-old continued, before predicting that there will soon be less emphasis on “what’s new” and more on “craft and creativity”.

Wintour was also asked about the involvement of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and Vogue Fund in helping to combat the ongoing struggles faced by emerging designers and smaller labels trying to stay afloat during the crisis.

“We are giving out grants to young people, young businesses in our communities that are most in need,” she stated.

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CFDA launching initiatives to combat systemic racism in fashion

Members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) are launching new initiatives to help fight systemic racism in the industry.In the wake of the shocking death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers o…

Members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) are launching new initiatives to help fight systemic racism in the industry.

In the wake of the shocking death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers on 25 May, numerous anti-racism protests have taken place across the U.S. and in major cities around the world.

Now, in response to the demonstrations, CFDA chairman Tom Ford and CFDA president and chief executive officer Steven Kolb have announced that the organisation will be employing new measures to help combat injustice within the fashion industry.

“Having a clear voice and speaking out against racial injustice, bigotry and hatred is the first step, but this is not enough,” they stated. “This is a deeply disturbing moment that speaks to us all. Our world is in deep pain. Our industry is in pain and it is not enough to simply say that we stand in solidarity with those who are discriminated against. We must do something.”

Effective immediately, the CFDA is creating an in-house employment programme specifically charged with placing black talent in all sectors of the fashion business to help achieve a racially-balanced industry, and will be founding a new mentorship and internship programme focused on students and recent graduates. Ford and Kolb will also be implementing a diversity and inclusion training programme for all members, and are making donations to civil rights organisations, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and Campaign Zero.

“We urge each and every member of the CFDA to take stock of their corporate structure to ensure that they have a racially balanced workforce and we challenge the retail sector of the fashion industry to ensure that their roster of brands and their product assortment is representative of the Black talent within the industry,” they concluded.

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CFDA and BFC leaders join forces to call for industry ‘reset’

Members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and British Fashion Council (BFC) are joining forces to call for an industry-wide “reset”.The coronavirus pandemic has hit the fashion business hard, with retailers forced to close stores te…

Members of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) and British Fashion Council (BFC) are joining forces to call for an industry-wide “reset”.

The coronavirus pandemic has hit the fashion business hard, with retailers forced to close stores temporarily and designers having to postpone collections due to manufacturing restrictions.

In light of the onset of the Covid-19 crisis, officials from the CFDA, led by chairman Tom Ford, and the BFC, overseen by chief executive Caroline Rush, have been in “close communication” and are sharing feedback about the ways the industry will need to “rethink and reset” in the coming months.

Among the initiatives set out in a statement issued on Wednesday was a call for the fashion system to change “at every level”.

“We encourage our brands, designers and retailers, who are used to fashion’s fast, unforgiving pace, to slow down. For a long time, there have been too many deliveries and too much merchandise generated. With existing inventory stacking up, designers and retailers must also look at the collections cycle and be very strategic about their products and how and when they intend to sell them,” they outlined, before encouraging designers to focus on delivering only two collections per year. “We firmly believe this can provide our talents with the time they need to reconnect to the creativity and craft that makes our field so unique in the first place.”

Elsewhere, the CFDA and BFC leaders urged designers and company executives to re-evaluate delivery schedules, harness sustainable fabrics and techniques wherever possible, and utilise virtual presentations to show collections to buyers and journalists.

“The need to align as a global industry during these times has become more apparent. We will continue to work side-by-side, while each city will develop its own local initiatives. Fashion is a business of creativity and new ideas and difficult times are also ones for innovation. We will work to our industry’s benefit as we reimagine and create, with our members and partners, a successful future,” the statement concluded.

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Elizabeth Hurley rewears chain mail Versace dress after 21 years

Elizabeth Hurley has recycled the purple chain mail Versace gown she wore in 1999 for a magazine photoshoot.The 54-year-old actress first wore the backless, lavender chain mail dress when she attended the 1999 Council of Fashion Designers of America (C…

Elizabeth Hurley has recycled the purple chain mail Versace gown she wore in 1999 for a magazine photoshoot.

The 54-year-old actress first wore the backless, lavender chain mail dress when she attended the 1999 Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) Awards with her then-boyfriend Hugh Grant, and she decided to bring the slinky cowl-neck gown out of storage more than two decades after its red carpet appearance to wear it for Harper’s Bazaar’s #TurnUpNotIn photo series, which shows stars in lockdown at home wearing their chicest outfits.

“Just hanging at home watching tv for @harpersbazaarus in a @versace dress I wore 21 years ago to the #cfdaawards #lockdown #nineweekstomorrow#TurnUpNotIn,” The Royals star wrote in the caption as she shared the photo on her Instagram page.

In the picture, Hurley can be seen draping herself over a fur throw while pointing a remote at a television, with her long brunette hair tumbling down over her shoulders.

“I’ve got a zillion great memories and I can remember what I was wearing in all of them,” she told Harper’s Bazaar about the Versace gown. “The dress I unearthed for this shot is Atelier Versace – I wore it 21 years ago to the CFDA Fashion Awards. I was with my then-boyfriend Hugh Grant and had a blast. I put it away in acid-free tissue paper straightaway, and it’s still perfect!”

Hurley ended her relationship with Grant in 2000 after 13 years of dating, but the pair has remained close friends, with the Four Weddings and a Funeral star being made godfather to the actress’s 18-year-old son Damian.

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Vogue and Amazon join forces on digital storefront initiative

Vogue executives have partnered with Amazon and the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) to launch a digital storefront initiative.Designed to boost small and medium-sized fashion businesses amid the Covid-19 pandemic, the e-commerce venture …

Vogue executives have partnered with Amazon and the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) to launch a digital storefront initiative.

Designed to boost small and medium-sized fashion businesses amid the Covid-19 pandemic, the e-commerce venture will be known as Common Threads: Vogue x Amazon Fashion.

The partnership, which went live earlier this week, was announced by U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour.

“I want to thank Amazon Fashion, not only for its generous support of A Common Thread but also for so quickly sharing its resources to aid American designers affected by the pandemic,” she commented.

In addition to promoting the partnership, Amazon bosses have has committed to making a $500,000 (£410,000) donation to A Common Thread – the organisation recently started by Wintour and CFDA chairman Tom Ford to instigate broader fundraising for the fashion industry.

The Common Threads storefront will see Amazon’s state-of-the-art distribution services and digital marketplace connect designers with consumers, compensating for the foot traffic lost from brick and mortar stores during the lockdown.

It will also highlight small American brands to Amazon’s vast established customer base.

And Wintour acknowledged that although the undertaking would not resolve the crisis hitting the fashion business, it was one solution to a complex problem.

“While there isn’t one simple fix for our industry, which has been hit so hard, I believe this is an important step in the right direction,” the 70-year-old added.

Designers will be given a lot of brand control in the project and can set their own prices and select the items they want to merchandise. The first wave of brands to feature on the site will include Batsheva, Chloe Gosselin, Derek Lam 10 Crosby, Jonathan Cohen, Tabitha Simmons, Alejandra Alonso Rojas, and Victor Glemaud, with more to follow.

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Anna Wintour cried over Ralph Lauren’s $10 million coronavirus donation

Anna Wintour cried when she heard that Ralph Lauren had donated $10 million (£8.1 million) to aid the battle against the coronavirus.In an op-ed for Vogue.com, the editor-in-chief opened up about the fashion industry’s response to the global pandemic,…

Anna Wintour cried when she heard that Ralph Lauren had donated $10 million (£8.1 million) to aid the battle against the coronavirus.

In an op-ed for Vogue.com, the editor-in-chief opened up about the fashion industry’s response to the global pandemic, which has so far infected more than 801,000 people, with almost 38,700 deaths, since the outbreak began in December.

Wintour shared her joy about the American designer’s generous donation, which was made via his foundation. The donation was spread across a range of organisations, including the World Health Organization’s Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund and the Council of Fashion Designers of America/Vogue Fashion Fund, which helps struggling designers during the crisis.

“Positivity is such a precious commodity right now, but I felt something close to pure joy in recent days,” Wintour wrote. “My emotions, like yours I’m sure, are fairly close to the surface, but I’m not afraid to admit that I broke down on the phone with Ralph when he called to give me the incredible news about his gift.”

The 70-year-old was overjoyed to see the likes of fashion conglomerates Moet Hennessy – Louis Vuitton (LVMH) and Kering rally round to support emergency workers on the frontlines in hospitals, as well as designers such as Miuccia Prada and Donatella Versace make personal donations to hard-hit hospitals.

“American fashion and beauty companies have been mobilising too, making masks, gowns and hand sanitiser. I have never been more proud of our industry,” she wrote.

She concluded her touching op-ed with a reminder that the pandemic will soon pass.

“There is so much loss and sadness now, but I keep hearing from friends and family members by phone and FaceTime and I know these weeks of isolation are reminding us how important our human connections are,” Wintour shared. “It will be impossible to take those connections for granted once this is behind us.”

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Paris Couture Week cancelled amid coronavirus crisis

Paris Couture Week and Paris Fashion Week: Men’s have been cancelled amid the coronavirus pandemic.France is one of the nations most affected by the spread of Covid-19, with an estimated 40,000 reported cases and approximately 2,600 deaths. In light of…

Paris Couture Week and Paris Fashion Week: Men’s have been cancelled amid the coronavirus pandemic.

France is one of the nations most affected by the spread of Covid-19, with an estimated 40,000 reported cases and approximately 2,600 deaths.

In light of the crisis and lockdown of citizens, representatives for the Federation de la Haute Couture et de la Mode have confirmed the two upcoming events have been scrapped.

“In light of the spread of the Covid-19 epidemic worldwide, strong decisions are required to ensure the safety and health of Houses, their employees and everyone working in our industry,” they said in a statement. “Consequently, the Board of Directors of the Federation de la Haute Couture et de la Mode has come to the decision that, in the present conditions, Paris Fashion Week: Men’s, scheduled from June 23rd to June 28th, 2020, and the Haute Couture Week scheduled from July 5 to July 9, 2020, cannot take place.”

However, the spokesperson insisted members of the federation are “actively working” with designers and fashion houses to find possible alternatives.

In addition to presentations from Chanel and Dior, the next Paris Couture Week was to feature the highly anticipated return of Balenciaga to the schedule.

Meanwhile, executives at the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) have also confirmed that the resort 2021 shows lined up for the middle of the year have been scrapped.

“The CFDA has been carefully following the developments of Covid-19, while providing information and resources to help the industry move forward during this most challenging time,” they commented. “With that in mind, the CFDA has decided to cancel the official NYFW: Resort 2021 schedule of presentations. The decision was based on the current global situation, the ongoing uncertainty regarding its impact on retailers and their open-to-buys, and designers’ challenges in producing collections at this moment.”

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Ralph Lauren donates $10 million towards coronavirus crisis relief efforts

Ralph Lauren has donated $10 million (£8.2 million) to help in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.In an announcement on Thursday, the American fashion icon confirmed that executives at his charitable foundation would be dispersing the money in…

Ralph Lauren has donated $10 million (£8.2 million) to help in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

In an announcement on Thursday, the American fashion icon confirmed that executives at his charitable foundation would be dispersing the money in order to aid organisations, workers, and communities in providing vital support and services to those in need.

“At the heart of our company, there has always been a spirit of togetherness that inspires our creativity, our confidence and most importantly our support for one another,” Lauren said. “In the past weeks and months, that spirit has never wavered. We believe that no matter who you are or where you are from, we are all connected. That is why we are taking significant action to help our teams and communities through this crisis.”

The huge donation will be used in a number of ways in the U.S. and around the world, including contributing to the World Health Organization’s Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund, supporting vulnerable cancer patients through Lauren’s existing Pink Pony Fund, and providing emergency financial grants for the Emergency Assistance Foundation.

Employees at the Ralph Lauren label will also be producing 25,000 gowns and 250,000 masks for doctors, nurses, and health care workers on the frontline.

“We recognise that this is an unprecedented, multifaceted crisis which demands different responses for different needs in different places. That is why we are funding multiple activities to support our teams, our partners and our communities around the world,” added Patrice Louvet, president and chief executive officer of The Ralph Lauren Corporate Foundation.

Lauren and Louvet have also committed to donating to the Council of Fashion Designers of America/Vogue Fashion Fund and those in the American fashion community impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic.

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