Marc Jacobs vows to be ‘better ally’ following cultural appropriation claims

Marc Jacobs has vowed to keep “listening and learning” after he was called out in a social media post for cultural appropriation.Back in 2016, the designer caused controversy when models including Gigi Hadid and Irina Shayk wore hand-dyed wool dreadloc…

Marc Jacobs has vowed to keep “listening and learning” after he was called out in a social media post for cultural appropriation.

Back in 2016, the designer caused controversy when models including Gigi Hadid and Irina Shayk wore hand-dyed wool dreadlocks during his show held as part of New York Fashion Week.

Jacobs was heavily criticised at the time, and was again chastised when he recently commented on an Instagram post uploaded by fashion watchdog account, Diet Prada.

After viewing the video of Kyla Lacey for Write About Now Poetry, the 57-year-old praised the performance, which discussed white privilege.

“I’m listening. I’m learning. This poem, and this human is extraordinary in every way,” Jacobs wrote, before he was called out by several followers in the comments section.

“We need to know what you do once you’ve HEARD. listening is not enough,” one stated, while another asked: “Didn’t one of your seasons appropriate black culture? Remember the dreads? The black community does.”

“I made a mistake. I didn’t listen when I was being corrected,” Jacobs replied. “I was insensitive and wrong with my response. I know better know. I keep listening and learning.”

The fashion star also responded to a comment which asked him to expand the foundation shades in his Marc Jacobs Beauty line.

“We have expanded our shade range. We did that two years ago. Thank you for sharing your comments. I promise you I am doing my all I can to be a better allie (sic),” he added.

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Adut Akech calls out Elle Germany over tone-deaf feature on black models

Adut Akech has slammed editors at Elle Germany over a tone-deaf feature about black models.On Tuesday, the fashion watchdogs behind Instagram account Diet Prada took aim at the publication over its November 2019 issue, which had a white model on the co…

Adut Akech has slammed editors at Elle Germany over a tone-deaf feature about black models.

On Tuesday, the fashion watchdogs behind Instagram account Diet Prada took aim at the publication over its November 2019 issue, which had a white model on the cover along with the tagline, “Back to Black,” and an article inside about black models titled “Black is back”, in which Janaye Furman was misidentified as Naomi Chin Wing.

Now, South Sudanese-Australian star Akech has expressed her dismay over the magazine’s attempt to highlight diversity in the fashion industry, and alongside screenshots on her Instagram Stories, wrote, “WTF (what the f**k). This is so sickening and makes me furious,” and, “Same thing, different girl every time SMH (shaking my head).”

In addition, the 19-year-old was dismayed to find one user defending the editors at Elle Germany in the comments section of the post and alleging there are “less than two per cent of Afro-Germans living in Germany”.

Accordingly, Akech fired back in response: “There’s always that ground of people that have no idea is what is being spoken of, let alone what they’re talking about themselves. But yet are so quick to jump on the defence side and look like this.”

Back in August, Akech accused editors at Australia’s Who Magazine of racism after they published a picture of Flavia Lazarus instead of her. She told her followers that she was left “insulted and disrespected” by the error, with bosses later apologising for the mistake.

In their original post about the latest issue of Elle Germany, the moderators at Diet Prada noted that they were baffled by the editorial decisions at the publication.

“Ironic when they, along with much of the fashion industry, have been complicit in denying visibility to black models until relatively recently. Oh, and apparently, they can’t actually tell models apart,” they wrote. “You can’t make this stuff up!”

Representatives for Elle Germany are yet to comment on the backlash.

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Diane von Furstenberg responds to criticism of newspaper print design

Diane von Furstenberg has hit back at criticism of a dress design featuring newspaper print.Representatives for the designer’s fashion brand recently posted an image of a model sporting the new Shia wrap dress on Instagram, with the number featuring a …

Diane von Furstenberg has hit back at criticism of a dress design featuring newspaper print.

Representatives for the designer’s fashion brand recently posted an image of a model sporting the new Shia wrap dress on Instagram, with the number featuring a collage of vintage press clippings.  

Later on, the team behind the Diet Prada account pointed out Furstenberg failed to credit other designers, such as Elsa Schiaparelli, for the concept, and accordingly, the 72-year-old had plenty to say on the matter.  

“Marisa Berenson has been my best friend since we were 18. Her grandmother was Elsa Schiaparelli and I was terrified to cross her in the hallway of her house where Marisa lived. Schiap had humour… except of course when her granddaughter did nude photos for Vogue!!!!” she wrote in the comments section of the post, before also referring to artists who used newspaper print in their work: “How about (Salvador) Dali and (Piero) Fornasetti? Newspaper print is like leopard print… timeless and so much fun!”  

The Shia wrap dress, which features pleating along the waist and oversized sleeves, is currently sold out on the company’s website.  

In the original post comparing Furstenberg’s outfit with some of Schiaparelli’s work, the moderators at Diet Prada also noted that John Galliano had used newspaper print during his time at Dior from 1996 until early 2011.  

“Hey @dvf … were you gonna mention the classic Elsa Schiaparelli concept behind your dress or nah? Schiap’s 1935 print was comprised of her own press clippings as well, although they were a little more timely then as opposed to DVF’s which date back to the ’70s,” they wrote. “Judging by the comments, DVF’s followers are more aware of Galliano’s year 2000 take on the print from his Dior collection inspired by the homeless people he saw around Paris, made famous of course by SJP/SATC (Sarah Jessica Parker in character as Carrie Bradshaw on TV show Sex and the City). We still stan a female fashion icon, although it would’ve been cool to see her acknowledge another woman who paved the way.”  

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Virgil Abloh responds to accusations of plagiarism

Virgil Abloh has sounded off over accusations of plagiarism relating to his designs.The designer rose to fame after serving as artistic director for Kanye West and JAY-Z’s 2011 album Watch the Throne and has since gone on to launch streetwear brand Off…

Virgil Abloh has sounded off over accusations of plagiarism relating to his designs.

The designer rose to fame after serving as artistic director for Kanye West and JAY-Z’s 2011 album Watch the Throne and has since gone on to launch streetwear brand Off-White as well as land the coveted role of head designer of menswear at Louis Vuitton.

While Abloh’s designs are among the most coveted in the fashion world, the founders of Instagram account Diet Prada, Tony Liu and Lindsey Schuyler, have accused him of plagiarism on at least three occasions – allegations he has now brushed off as coincidental.

“All props to them, that’s a great concept,” he said of Diet Prada in an interview with The New Yorker, before going on to reject the account administrators’ comparison of a yellow graffitied ensemble from Cologne-based Colrs and a similar design in his Off-White collection. “(The allegation was founded on) basically the use of a yellow fabric with a pattern on it… Ring the alarm!”

In addition, Liu and Schuyler have also claimed there are similarities between a chair designed by Paul McCobb for his Planner Group series in the 1950s and a chair made by Abloh for his Ikea collaboration, as well as a resemblance between artist AG Fronzoni’s designs and the graphics on an Off-White T-shirt from the fall/winter 2016 collection.

Accordingly, Abloh went on to explain that some “cheat codes” are acceptable in fashion, and in his opinion, streetwear is linked to the work of Dada artist Marcel Duchamp.

“It’s this idea of the readymade. I’m talking Lower East Side, New York. It’s like hip-hop. It’s sampling. I take James Brown, I chop it up, I make a new song. I’m taking Ikea and I’m presenting it in my own way. It’s streetwear 10.0-the logic that you can reference an object or reference a brand or reference something,” the 38-year-old shared.

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Kim Kardashian suing Missguided to stop them using name and image

Kim Kardashian has filed a lawsuit against Missguided executives to stop them using her name and likeness to sell knock-offs of her outfits. The reality TV star and beauty mogul shared a picture of her wearing a sexy gold cut-out dress, which had been…

Kim Kardashian has filed a lawsuit against Missguided executives to stop them using her name and likeness to sell knock-offs of her outfits.

The reality TV star and beauty mogul shared a picture of her wearing a sexy gold cut-out dress, which had been designed by her husband Kanye West, on Instagram earlier in February (19), and less than three hours later, a cheaper version of the outfit was listed on the Missguided website, leading fashion watchdog Diet Prada to question if she was secretly working with the U.K.-based fast fashion brand.

However, Kim has now proved they aren’t collaborating by taking legal steps to distance herself from the company and make sure they never use her name, image and likeness again.

In the lawsuit filing, her lawyer Michael Kump states that Kim has taken issue with the fashion executives posting photos of her on Instagram and tagging her in its posts, as she believes they are tricking consumers into thinking she has given her permission and is working with them.

Kump provided a side-by-side comparison of Kim’s and Missguided’s Instagram posts featuring the similar gold dress, with her name tagged in their caption.

“Missguided purposefully inserted Kardashian’s Instagram username (@kimkardashian) into its post to capitalize on her celebrity status and social media following in promoting the sale of its upcoming product,” he wrote, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

“Missguided’s U.S. website has included entire pages that are devoted solely to the sale of clothing inspired by Kardashian, and on which Kardashian’s name and likeness are prominently used without her permission to promote the products.”

Kardashian is suing them for violation of her right of publicity and trademark infringement, among other claims. She is seeking at least $10 million (£7.6 million) in damages and an injunction barring Missguided from using her name, image and likeness.

The legal news comes shortly after the 38-year-old blasted bosses at fast fashion brand Fashion Nova for creating a cheap version of the revealing Thierry Mugler cut-out gown she wore to an awards show days before.

In a lengthy statement, she declared: “I’m not leaking my looks to anyone, and I don’t support what these companies are doing.”

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Christian Siriano pulls two gowns from collection over plagiarism accusations

Christian Siriano has withdrawn two gowns he debuted at his fall/winter 2019 New York Fashion Week show after he was called out for plagiarism by fashion watchdogs Diet Prada.On Monday (11Feb19) Diet Prada, an Instagram account run by Tony Liu and Lind…

Christian Siriano has withdrawn two gowns he debuted at his fall/winter 2019 New York Fashion Week show after he was called out for plagiarism by fashion watchdogs Diet Prada.

On Monday (11Feb19) Diet Prada, an Instagram account run by Tony Liu and Lindsey Schuyler which famously highlights design rip-offs, posted a series of images showing side-by-side comparisons of gowns from Siriano’s show, which he presented on Saturday, to gowns from Maison Valentino’s spring 2018 couture show.

“@csiriano deserves credit for being so inclusive as a brand. This pink @maisonvalentino Spring 2018 couture gown maybe shouldn’t have been included in his FW19 collection though. Dieters (followers), thoughts on the purple pillowcase number as well? We just hope he’s not passing on these tips in his new gig as mentor on Project Runway lol (laugh out loud),” they wrote in the caption.

Diet Prada called out two looks from Siriano’s collection which looked uncannily similar to those designed by Valentino – a strapless, billowing blue gown and a shorter purple dress trimmed with oversized ruffles.

However, the popular designer responded quickly to the accusation, and commented under the post: “Yea wow last time I have this designer in my studio make a dress. Agree, it’s pulled.”

“I don’t look at collections, so I had no idea what they were even referencing, but yes I agree it looks very similar,” he continued in a comment to WWD. “I wish I could control and make every single dress myself that we put out there, but it’s not physically possible.”

Siriano is famous for his inclusivity and diversity in his casting, and for always being open to dressing women of all sizes on the red carpet. His fall 2019 show was closed by plus-size model Ashley Graham.

The designer is also set to serve as a mentor in the Bravo reboot of Project Runway, the show which gave him his start in the fashion industry after he won the fourth season.

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