Kim Jones guest-edits Harper’s Bazaar’s first men’s magazine in 50 years

Kim Jones has guest-edited Harper’s Bazaar’s first men’s magazine in more than 50 years.The special print supplement is dedicated solely to men’s style and inspired by the original Men’s Bazaar publication which was released in the 1960s. Jones, artist…

Kim Jones has guest-edited Harper’s Bazaar’s first men’s magazine in more than 50 years.

The special print supplement is dedicated solely to men’s style and inspired by the original Men’s Bazaar publication which was released in the 1960s.

Jones, artistic director of Dior Homme, took to Instagram to reveal his new gig and share the five special covers of the magazine, which feature himself and musicians Maluma, Travis Scott, J Balvin, and Orville Peck wearing pieces from the French fashion house.

“I’m happy to announce the first @harpersbazaarus men’s issue guest edited by Me!” he wrote alongside the snaps.

In his editorial for the magazine, the 40-year-old designer explained that he was inspired to create the diverse and inclusive covers for the men’s issue by late fashion illustrator and photographer Antonio Lopez.

“He’s an absolute hero of mine; I would have loved to have met him,” Jones wrote. “I was thinking about his New York, about the mix and diversity of the people Antonio photographed and drew in the 1970s and Eighties – the vibrancy and energy, the freedom – and I wanted to capture some of that in these images and reflect it through fashion for now.”

He went on to reveal that he picked Latinx musicians Maluma and Balvin because they “look like Antonio boys” and noted that if the late photographer were alive today, he would be a huge fan of rapper Scott.

“As for Orville Peck, I love both his image and the messages behind his music,” he added.

A spokesperson for Harper’s Bazaar owners Hearst said the men’s supplement will most likely be a quarterly edition, with different guest editors.

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Kim Jones reimagined Christian Dior’s archive for modern menswear line

Kim Jones looked to Christian Dior’s archive for inspiration when creating his modern menswear collection. The British designer became creative director of Dior Homme in March 2018 after exiting Louis Vuitton, and immediately investigated the history o…

Kim Jones looked to Christian Dior’s archive for inspiration when creating his modern menswear collection.

The British designer became creative director of Dior Homme in March 2018 after exiting Louis Vuitton, and immediately investigated the history of the iconic French designer.

“I just really wanted to look at Christian Dior’s work, and what it would be relevant as in the 21st century, so to speak. I looked at the archive, and particularly the background of his life, because there’s a huge amount of things (that happened) before he was a couturier.

“All the time you find something new. I haven’t gone completely through it, but I wanted to find things that defined (him),” he said to SHOWstudio of the inspiration for his debut menswear line for Dior Men in June last year.

Going forward, Jones is keen to incorporate Dior’s passions into future collections as a tribute to one of the founders of fashion.

“For example, I looked at his love of nature – which is something I’m also really interested in – I wanted floral because there’s a huge amount of florals in his works,” he shared.

“The three things that (my collection) were based on was the tailoring, the couture element, and then the elegance of Christian Dior as a brand.”

During the lengthy interview, the London-born fashion star was quizzed about the influence of his former mentors – stylist Judy Blame, who passed away in 2018, the late Louise Wilson, who died in 2014, and Lee Alexander McQueen, who committed suicide in 2010.

The designer recently dedicated his guest-edited issue of A Magazine Curated By to his three friends, who he said he would’ve asked to contribute to the magazine had they still been alive.

“Lee and Louise are the two most important people. Louise gave me the confidence to go and do what I needed to do, and Lee was always there to say, ‘F**k ’em, go and do it, don’t listen to people, listen to yourself’,” he said.

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