Johnny Depp defends Dior campaign after Native American outrage

Johnny Depp has defended his new Dior perfume campaign following angry protests from Native Americans. The promotional film for the French luxury brand’s Sauvage perfume features Depp playing the guitar in the desert while his Native American co-star …

Johnny Depp has defended his new Dior perfume campaign following angry protests from Native Americans.

The promotional film for the French luxury brand’s Sauvage perfume features Depp playing the guitar in the desert while his Native American co-star Canku One Star of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe performs a warrior dance in a traditional headdress and clothing.

While the clip was pulled shortly after teasers debuted on 30 August after several leading Native American activists and actors responded angrily, Johnny remains adamant that the advert was meant to respect indigenous culture.

“A teaser obviously is a very concentrated version of images and there were objections to the teaser of the small film. The film has never been seen,” he told The Hollywood Reporter at the Deauville American Film Festival in France.

“There was never – and how could there be or how would there be – any dishonorable (intent). The film was made with a great respect for the indigenous people not just of North America but all over the world. It’s a pity that people jumped the gun and made these objections. However, their objections are their objections.”

Pledging to work with those raising objections to release a revised full version of the advert, he added: “I can assure you that no one has any reason to go out to try to exploit. It was a film made out of great respect and with great respect and love for the Native American peoples to bring light to them.

“They haven’t had the greatest amount of help out of the United States government. The idea is as pure as it ever was, so we will come to an agreement so that everyone is happy.”

The backlash against the film has even included one of its stars, Tanaya Beatty, a Canadian actress of Da’Naxda’xw Nation descent, who said she felt indigenous culture had been “disrespected” during filming and encouraged Johnny to donate to Native American charities.

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Cara Delevingne wonders if Karl Lagerfeld was happy working until he died

Cara Delevingne often wonders if Karl Lagerfeld was happy working in the fashion industry right up until his death. The legendary Chanel and Fendi creative director continued working right up until he got sick in early 2019 and subsequently passed away…

Cara Delevingne often wonders if Karl Lagerfeld was happy working in the fashion industry right up until his death.

The legendary Chanel and Fendi creative director continued working right up until he got sick in early 2019 and subsequently passed away due to complications of pancreatic cancer at the age of 85 in February.

In a new interview with Marie Claire magazine, Delevingne, who was a Chanel muse and close friend of Lagerfeld’s, described the fashion icon as a “best friend, father, grandfather, fairy godmother, like Peter Pan,” but also questioned why he felt the need to keep busy until the end.

“The fashion industry breeds this thing of never being good enough. Was he happy? Did he feel proud?” she asked.

The 27-year-old wrote a moving tribute to Lagerfeld on social media after his passing in which she told her followers, “He changed my life, he believed in me when so many others didn’t – including myself.”

It was recently announced that the Suicide Squad star was taking part in A Tribute to Karl: The White Shirt Project, in which she will design a top inspired by Lagerfeld’s signature crisp, white, high-collared shirt. The garments, also designed by Kate Moss and Amber Valletta, will benefit the French charity Sauver la Vie, which the late designer quietly supported.

The British model-turned-actress signed a modelling contract a decade ago and went on to walk the runway for the likes of Tommy Hilfiger, Valentino and Louis Vuitton, but she is now mostly focused on her acting career, which includes an upcoming role in Amazon series Carnival Row.

She admitted to Marie Claire that she used her hectic modelling schedule to escape her personal problems.

“Work to me was such an escape. I don’t like using it that way anymore. I want to use it as a platform, where I’m not just running from my problems,” Delevingne, who still works with brands like Puma and Dior, stated.

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Adut Akech experienced racism and bullying at high school

Adut Akech is making it her mission to empower and educate children because she was targeted by bullies while at school.  The model, who was born in South Sudan, raised in Kenya, and moved to Adelaide, Australia as a child, has become one of the m…

Adut Akech is making it her mission to empower and educate children because she was targeted by bullies while at school.  

The model, who was born in South Sudan, raised in Kenya, and moved to Adelaide, Australia as a child, has become one of the most exciting new names in fashion over the past few seasons. 

However, in a recent interview with Refinery29, Adut recalled the difficulties she experienced in her high school years, where she was the victim of racism, bullying, and teasing over her appearance.  

“I experienced racism, and I got bullied about my skin and my gap tooth and my height. I want to help people understand what it is to be a refugee,” the 19-year-old stated. “We are just like everybody else; the only difference is that we were forced out of our own countries, out of our own homes because of fear, not by choice. You don’t wake up and say, ‘Today I’m going to be a refugee and move to a refugee camp.’ I would love to see schools educate children, so they know not to bully children just because they are refugees.” 

And the beauty, who has walked for the likes of Valentino, Dior, Givenchy, and Versace, went on to remark that the traits she was bullied over in high school have turned out to be the aspects of her appearance she loves the most.

“Honestly, I’m so glad that I didn’t let what anyone said get to me, because everything that I got bullied for, I love so much today,” she explained.  

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Valentina Sampaio hopes Victoria’s Secret role is step towards more inclusivity

Transgender model Valentina Sampaio hopes her new role with Victoria’s Secret is a step towards more inclusivity in the fashion industry.The Brazilian star hit headlines last week when it was revealed she had become the first openly transgender model t…

Transgender model Valentina Sampaio hopes her new role with Victoria’s Secret is a step towards more inclusivity in the fashion industry.

The Brazilian star hit headlines last week when it was revealed she had become the first openly transgender model to work with the lingerie brand in its 42-year history.  

In a new interview with Vogue, Sampaio said she’s “happy and proud” to have landed the gig for the VS Pink line and hopes it is a step in the right direction towards more acceptance in the business.  

“Being appointed the first transgender model for the brand is a hugely important moment not only for myself but (for) my community and beyond,” she said. “I hope (this can) be a huge step toward more inclusivity and representation for everybody.  

“My dream (now) is to live in a world where representation is celebrated… I believe brands are beginning to see the value of inclusiveness, but there is a lot more work to do in our industry, culture, and society. I truly hope to be able to work with more brands that understand the importance of this.” 

Sampaio first rose to prominence when she was tapped for the March 2017 cover of Vogue Paris, becoming the first transgender model to grace the front of any Vogue magazine. She has since worked for the likes of L’Oreal, Dior, H&M, and Marc Jacobs. 

Accordingly, the model hopes to use her visibility and platform “to try to change the status quo” and is looking forward to a future where it won’t be deemed newsworthy for transgender stars to be on magazines or work with fashion brands.   

“Imagine a world where it is not news that a transgender model has been appointed by a fashion brand,” the 22-year-old continued. “Wouldn’t that be amazing?! Because it would mean that it is normal, and it is happening all the time. I want to see this across all communities. Ultimately, I want to live in a world with more respect for every kind of human being.” 

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Maria Grazia Chiuri pleased to see people wearing copies of her feminist T-shirts

Maria Grazia Chiuri was “happy” to see people wearing copies of her feminist T-shirts after her debut show for Dior.Back in 2016, the Italian designer was tapped as the first female creative director for the French fashion house, and when she released …

Maria Grazia Chiuri was “happy” to see people wearing copies of her feminist T-shirts after her debut show for Dior.

Back in 2016, the Italian designer was tapped as the first female creative director for the French fashion house, and when she released her spring/summer 2016 collection, quickly garnered attention for her line of white tops bearing the title of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s essay We Should All Be Feminists.

While the T-shirts are priced at $860 (£580), and are therefore out of many customers’ budgets, Chiuri has now shared that she is fine with seeing people sporting knock-offs as it means that a luxury brand is sending a “good message”.

“Of course, we have to acknowledge we are a luxury brand and that not all people can buy our products,” she commented in an interview by author and feminist leader Robin Morgan for U.S. Harper’s Bazaar. “But I was so happy after my first show when I did the We Should All Be Feminists T-shirt and I saw fake T-shirts all around the world!”

While most fashion designers would be displeased to see consumers wearing copies or buying knock-offs, Chiuri is particularly fine with it because it means people are investigating the inspiration behind the design and are sharing the message with others.

“If someone sees your book titles on a T-shirt and then Googles and finds the books, that’s the goal for me,” the 55-year-old smiled. “And, really, I can thank Dior for supporting me in this. Everyone seemed worried, ‘Uh-oh, you are political.’ But the company never stopped me. Everything is political anyway! Everything you buy, everything you eat. Life is political!”

Chiuri is to receive the Sisterhood Is Powerful Award for Wearable Media at the annual Women’s Media Awards event in New York City in October.

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Natalie Portman reflects on ‘ephemeral’ nature of beauty

Natalie Portman works hard on various projects because she knows beauty is “ephemeral”.The Oscar winner is considered to be one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood and has been the face of French fashion house Dior since 2010. However, Natalie ha…

Natalie Portman works hard on various projects because she knows beauty is “ephemeral”.

The Oscar winner is considered to be one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood and has been the face of French fashion house Dior since 2010.

However, Natalie has now shared in an interview with Harper’s Bazaar U.K. that she finds it frustrating whenever she’s judged only on her looks.

“As a woman, you are constantly fighting against only being valued for your looks, because it becomes a very tenuous thing, to be defined by the gaze of others, the opinion of others,” the 38-year-old commented. “And beauty is, by definition, ephemeral, it’s a thing that you can’t trap in time, it’s a butterfly, it lives for a second. So to make a lifetime worthwhile and have meaning cannot rest on beauty…”

In spite of her stance, Natalie did emphasise that while she’s aware of political and social unrest across the world, she takes comfort in focusing on herself from time to time, to escape the world around her. One way she does this is by dressing up in beautiful clothes.

“I love beauty and I love glamour, and they can be part of the sweetness of life in the face of really dark things – and that has great worth,” the mother-of-two shared.

Elsewhere in the interview, Natalie revealed that she is hugely impressed with the work Maria Grazia Chiuri is doing at Dior, having been tapped as the luxury label’s first female artistic director in 2016.

“It’s wonderful to have a woman designing for other women, someone who understands us, and knows that maybe we might want to wear a T-shirt with a skirt and flats, or have pockets in our dresses,” Natalie gushed, before adding that the designer’s comfortable creations are almost political. “If a woman can’t breathe in her dress, what does that mean? It’s the most literal symbol of oppression that you could possibly have – it’s so political.”

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Elsa Hosk shares clothes with her boyfriend

Elsa Hosk shares a lot of her clothes with her boyfriend Tom Daly. The Swedish star has modelled for brands including Dior, Dolce & Gabbana and H&M, and has been a Victoria’s Secret Angel since 2015, but when she’s not wearing high fashion on catwalks…

Elsa Hosk shares a lot of her clothes with her boyfriend Tom Daly.

The Swedish star has modelled for brands including Dior, Dolce & Gabbana and H&M, and has been a Victoria’s Secret Angel since 2015, but when she’s not wearing high fashion on catwalks and in campaigns, Hosk borrows from Daly’s wardrobe to find her off-duty look.

“I share a lot of clothes with my boyfriend,” Hosk shared to Vogue.com.au. “I buy him a lot of vintage ’50s Hawaiian shirts that I steal when we are on vacation. I also borrow his suits sometimes and he borrows all my super oversized Balenciaga stuff and cashmere Elder Statesman sweaters. Sometimes I get something for both of us in mind.”

The 30-year-old, who has been dating the creative director of District Vision since 2015, believes times are changing in fashion and men and women are able to wear the same clothes.

“I think rules in fashion are going away,” she added. “Men and women can wear the same clothes – people are most beautiful and comfortable when they wear exactly what they want! It’s so cool when women wear traditional mens clothes and vice versa!”

Hosk sat down to chat with the publication to promote her new sustainable denim line with J Brand, and revealed that she was heavily involved in the design process for the 11-piece capsule collection.

“J Brand gave me full creative control which was so much fun for me,” Hosk gushed. “I was very quick in deciding what I wanted to do so I put together a presentation with sketches and inspiration pictures of around ten styles and they chose the ones that they liked the most… After that we made first samples and had many fittings to get the fit, wash and fabric as close as possible to our shared vision.”

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Natalie Portman: ‘There’s a revolution occurring in beauty industry’

Natalie Portman is adamant make-up can play a part in the female-led revolution occurring in Hollywood.The Oscar-winning actress is a staunch political activist and has been involved in the U.S. Women’s March equal rights organisation and the developme…

Natalie Portman is adamant make-up can play a part in the female-led revolution occurring in Hollywood.

The Oscar-winning actress is a staunch political activist and has been involved in the U.S. Women’s March equal rights organisation and the development of the #MeToo movement.

And in a new interview with Marie Claire, Portman explained how she feels cosmetics and a woman’s beauty can be revolutionary.

“I think everyone now feels free to use beauty products as much or as little as they want, and the relaxing of those constraints is a revolution in itself,” she shared. “It allows you to reveal who you are but also to protect by masking yourself. Sometimes you want a bold lipstick, and sometimes no make-up at all. No matter what you decide, it doesn’t dictate who you are.”

The Black Swan star is keen to use as many natural products as possible in her beauty routine, after being inspired by the make-up artist on the set of her first film Leon: The Professional back in 1994.

“For my first role, the make-up artist on set used beet juice mixed with rose water for my character’s cheeks, and it always made me want to use the most natural products possible,” the 38-year-old shared.

The actress, who is the face of Dior’s hugely successful fragrance Miss Dior, also revealed that one of her favourite scents is jasmine, as it transports her back to Morocco where she travelled extensively during her twenties.

“Smell is the most emotional of the senses. It’s one of the earliest to develop, so scents hit you at your core and can take you back to a particular place and time,” Portman explained.

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Christian Louboutin to showcase huge shoe collection in Paris museum

Christian Louboutin is to showcase his vast shoe collection in a new exhibition in Paris.After funding a partial restoration of the Palais de la Porte Doree, the French designer will take over more than 14,000 square foot of the Art Deco-inspired locat…

Christian Louboutin is to showcase his vast shoe collection in a new exhibition in Paris.

After funding a partial restoration of the Palais de la Porte Doree, the French designer will take over more than 14,000 square foot of the Art Deco-inspired location in February 2020.

“It’s an open window to my brain,” he told WWD of the showcase, which will include more than 200 pairs of shoes alongside an eclectic mix of furnishings and art installations.

“The heel is back in the museum in full force, only it’s not only an exhibition of high heels. We have flat shoes, too,” Louboutin shared, referencing the historical monument’s previous ban on high heels.

One of his earliest shoe designs was a pump in metallic leather inspired by the iridescent fish in the tank at the Palais de la Porte Doree.

“Some of the first influencers were fish,” the fashion star quipped.

Also included in the exhibition are a pair of boots made out of bark that date back to 1987.

Another exhibition, dubbed a treasure room, will run alongside Louboutin’s shoe showcase, and will include a variety of unique objects and artworks collected by the Frenchman.

On show will be shoes that once belonged to Mae West, jewellery by Dior’s Victoire de Castellane, plus artworks by Pierre Molinier and Andy Warhol.

Curator Olivier Gabet wants the exhibition to showcase the iconic shoe designer’s “deep, very original relationship,” with the decorative arts and expects it to be very popular with the French public and tourists.

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LVMH chairman Bernard Arnault worth more than $100 billion

LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton chairman Bernard Arnault is now worth more than $100 billion.The French luxury fashion magnate hit the milestone on Wednesday, with his wealth growing by a staggering $32 billion this year alone, according to the Bloomb…

LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton chairman Bernard Arnault is now worth more than $100 billion.

The French luxury fashion magnate hit the milestone on Wednesday, with his wealth growing by a staggering $32 billion this year alone, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

Arnault, who is already Europe’s richest person, joins Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Microsoft founder Bill Gates in the world’s most exclusive wealth club with a fortune of at least $100 billion.

The 70-year-old is head of the luxury goods conglomerate, which owns brands including Dior, Louis Vuitton, and Moet & Chandon.

Arnault was also among those who pledged huge amounts of money to repair the Notre-Dame in Paris after a devastating fire raged through the medieval cathedral in April.

He pledged €200 million ($224 million), although a senior Notre-Dame press official recently told editors at news agency AP that the donation had yet to materialise.

“The big donors haven’t paid. Not a cent,” said Andre Finot. “They want to know what exactly their money is being spent on and if they agree to it before they hand it over, and not just to pay employees’ salaries.”

Francois Pinault of Artemis, the parent company of Gucci and Saint Laurent owner Kering, and Patrick Pouyanne of French energy company Total, promised €100 million ($112 million), and the Bettencourt Schueller Foundation of the L’Oréal fortune, also pledged €200 million.

Arnault’s fortune now equals more than three per cent of France’s economy.

According to reporters at Business of Fashion, the appetite for Louis Vuitton handbags and Hennessy cognac has soared in China, and in turn has bolstered results for LVMH, causing their shares to surge 43 per cent this year.

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