Hans Zimmer ‘devastated’ by Ennio Morricone’s death

Hans Zimmer has been left “devastated” by the death of fellow film composer Ennio Morricone. The acclaimed Italian musician passed away at the age of 91 on Monday in a hospital in Rome days after he suffered a fall and broke his leg. He scored more th…

Hans Zimmer has been left “devastated” by the death of fellow film composer Ennio Morricone.

The acclaimed Italian musician passed away at the age of 91 on Monday in a hospital in Rome days after he suffered a fall and broke his leg. He scored more than 500 movies throughout his career, including The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Once Upon a Time in the West, The Mission, and Cinema Paradiso, and won an Oscar for Quentin Tarantino’s 2015 film The Hateful Eight.

Zimmer, who is known for his work on films such as The Lion King, Inception, and Gladiator, gave an interview to BBC Breakfast about Morricone’s death on Monday and admitted he was shocked by the news.

“I’m devastated obviously by this because Ennio was an icon and icons just don’t go away, icons are there forever,” he gushed. “It really has taken me by surprise because he was still touring. I saw him about a year ago and he seemed strong, he was conducting at the O2 (Arena in London)… He was one of a kind. He never stopped speaking Italian. He never bothered to learn English. I was a huge fan of his.”

The German musician went on praise Morricone for inspiring him to pursue a career in composing movie scores.

“He was a major influence on me – the first movie I ever saw was Once Upon a Time in the West and I heard that music and I saw those images and I went ‘That’s what I want to do,'” he shared. “One of the things which was vitally important for him was that the music would always have quality. Sometimes he would work – we all have done this – on not such great movies but his music was always outstanding and done with great emotional fortitude and great intellectual thought.”

Other stars have paid tribute to Morricone on social media, such as Baby Driver director Edgar Wright, who shared a bunch of his scores on Twitter alongside the caption: “Where to even begin with iconic composer Ennio Morricone? He could make an average movie into a must see, a good movie into art, and a great movie into legend. He hasn’t been off my stereo my entire life. What a legacy of work he leaves behind. RIP.”

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Michael Cera suffered concussion during Chris Evans fight scene in Scott Pilgrim

Michael Cera came away concussed after a brutal fight scene with Chris Evans while shooting Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.The actor played the geeky titular character in Edgar Wright’s cult classic, and he recalled filming the 2010 action comedy to celeb…

Michael Cera came away concussed after a brutal fight scene with Chris Evans while shooting Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.

The actor played the geeky titular character in Edgar Wright’s cult classic, and he recalled filming the 2010 action comedy to celebrate the movie’s upcoming 10th anniversary.

In the movie, Scott must fight off the evil ex-boyfriends of Ramona Flowers, played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead, and in one memorable scene, he comes face-to-face with Evans’ fictional movie star Lucas Lee.

Cera told Entertainment Weekly that he suffered for his art while shooting the fight scene with the Captain America star, as was almost knocked out thanks to having a skateboard repeatedly smashed over his head.

“It was freezing when we were shooting that fight with Chris Evans all through the night. There was this moment where I get hit over the head with a skateboard, which was supposed to explode on impact,” he explained. “They build this skateboard out of balsa wood; I’m wearing a helmet under my hat. But this thing would not break. We did, like, five takes of me just getting hit over the head full force in an effort to make (it) explode.

“I felt myself getting a concussion,” the 32-year-old continued. “After five takes of that, I said to Edgar, ‘I don’t think I can do this anymore.’ They did it with a CG effect in the end.”

Considered a box office flop, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World went on to become a cult classic. Brie Larson, Kieran Culkin and Anna Kendrick co-star.

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Edgar Wright: ‘Seth Rogen almost played Scott Pilgrim’

Seth Rogen almost landed the titular role in Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, according to director Edgar Wright.The British filmmaker recently marked the upcoming 10th anniversary of the cult classic with an in-depth interview about making the action-come…

Seth Rogen almost landed the titular role in Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, according to director Edgar Wright.

The British filmmaker recently marked the upcoming 10th anniversary of the cult classic with an in-depth interview about making the action-comedy with Entertainment Weekly, and he revealed that at one point, the film could’ve been completely different.

Wright recalled that Donna Langley, who was Universal Pictures’ president of production at the time, pitched Rogen to play geeky Scott, who falls in love with the mysterious Ramona, played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead.

But while the Hot Fuzz director loved the Knocked Up funnyman, he “couldn’t get (his) head around” the casting decision.

“Michael Cera was the only person who came to mind,” Wright said about casting the role of Scott. “I loved Arrested Development, he’s Canadian, he’s scrawny, he plays guitar, and the idea of Michael as a Romeo is just inherently amusing.”

Cera went on to portray the lovestruck bassist, who has to fight off seven of Ramona’s evil ex-boyfriends, who were played by the likes of Chris Evans, Brandon Routh, and Jason Schwartzman.

Elsewhere in the interview, the 46-year-old filmmaker recalled being sent an encouraging email from Universal’s then co-president of marketing Michael Moses after Scott Pilgrim bombed at the box office.

“Monday morning Michael Moses sent an email with three words,” Wright explained. “It was one of the sweetest emails I’ve ever gotten from anybody in the industry. It said, ‘Years, not days.'”

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Edgar Wright hated Seth MacFarlane after Scott Pilgrim jibe

Edgar Wright “never liked” Seth MacFarlane after he made a jibe about his film, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.The director celebrated the 10th anniversary of the cult comedy with an oral history of making the movie with Entertainment Weekly, and revealed…

Edgar Wright “never liked” Seth MacFarlane after he made a jibe about his film, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.

The director celebrated the 10th anniversary of the cult comedy with an oral history of making the movie with Entertainment Weekly, and revealed the Family Guy creator irked him by poking fun at the film’s disappointing box office opening weekend.

Michael Cera played the titular character in the star-studded 2010 flick, alongside Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Kieran Culkin, Anna Kendrick, Chris Evans, Brie Larson and Aubrey Plaza, which was based on the graphic novels by Canadian author and artist Bryan Lee O’Malley.

Despite the movie’s star power, it only grossed $10 million (£8 million) during its debut weekend, losing out to The Expendables and Eat Pray Love.

“I remember getting an email from Marc Platt, one of the film’s producers, on the Friday asking Universal to put more into the spend and predicting doom for the weekend,” Wright explained. “And I thought – naively – I thought, ‘Well, it’s only Friday morning, how could they know?’ They know. It opened at number five.”

And the British filmmaker was frustrated watching the film get turned into “a bit of a punchline”, and he recalled being annoyed after MacFarlane joked about the movie on Twitter.

“I’ve never liked Seth MacFarlane, because that weekend he tweeted ‘Scott Pilgrim 0, the World 2,’” Wright said. “I was like, f**k you. And then I lay in wait until (A Million Ways to Die in the West) came out, or whatever it was called, and I rubbed my hands with glee. I didn’t tweet anything because I’m not a total monster.”

MacFarlane’s 2014 comedy raked in just $16 million (£13 million) on its opening weekend, despite starring Charlize Theron, Liam Neeson and Amanda Seyfried.

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Edgar Wright’s Last Night in Soho postponed by seven months

The release of Edgar Wright’s upcoming film Last Night in Soho has been postponed by seven months. The Baby Driver director’s next outing, a psychological thriller starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Thomasin McKenzie, and Matt Smith, was originally set to be r…

The release of Edgar Wright’s upcoming film Last Night in Soho has been postponed by seven months.

The Baby Driver director’s next outing, a psychological thriller starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Thomasin McKenzie, and Matt Smith, was originally set to be released on 25 September 2020, but bosses at Universal Pictures, which own Focus Features, removed the movie from their schedule following the widespread closure of cinemas following the coronavirus pandemic.

Many fans wondered about the fate of Last Night in Soho when Universal executives rescheduled their movies and failed to give it a new release date, and Wright has now explained that the movie isn’t finished yet because post-production was interrupted by the health crisis.

Announcing the new release date of 23 April 2021, the Hot Fuzz director wrote on Twitter on Tuesday: “Haunted by someone else’s past, but we’ll see you in the future… It’s true, #LastNightInSoho is not quite finished yet due to Covid-19. But, I’m excited for you all to experience it, at a big screen near you, on April 23, 2021.”

Alongside the message, Wright shared a still of Taylor-Joy putting her arms on the shoulders of Smith in a ’60s telephone booth.

According to IMDb, Last Night in Soho follows a young girl who is mysteriously able to enter the 1960s, where she encounters her idol, a dazzling wannabe singer. But 1960s London is not what it seems, and time seems to fall apart with shady consequences.

The project is set and was filmed in London’s Soho district between May and August last year. Wright directed the film from a script he co-wrote with 1917 writer Krysty Wilson-Cairns. He is also producing the movie alongside Nira Park and Working Title’s Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner.

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Simon Pegg considering Hot Fuzz sequel

Simon Pegg is considering returning to the role of hapless cop Nicholas Angel in a Hot Fuzz sequel.The British actor starred as Angel alongside his pal Nick Frost in Edgar Wright’s 2007 film, the second instalment in the Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy…

Simon Pegg is considering returning to the role of hapless cop Nicholas Angel in a Hot Fuzz sequel.

The British actor starred as Angel alongside his pal Nick Frost in Edgar Wright’s 2007 film, the second instalment in the Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy, which also includes Shaun of the Dead and The World’s End.

And speaking to Movieweb.com, Simon admitted that he wouldn’t mind starring in a Hot Fuzz sequel, as the buddy cop action films it parodies often had multiple follow-up movies.

“I think it’s the one film out of those three movies that lends itself to a sequel, in that, those kind of buddy-cop action movies were often sequelised,” he explained.

And Simon already has an idea for a new plot – reversing the original’s set-up of Angel being sent to police a small country village and taking the junior policeman played by Nick, Danny Butterman, to the city.

“We already joked about having a Crocodile Dundee reversal of it being Danny in the city,” he added. “The hypothetical sequel would be Danny and Angel in the big city together.”

However, the star did warn fans that a sequel is by no means a certainty, as he may be getting a little old for the part.

“I’d love to play Nicholas Angel again, that was fun. I’m probably too old now,” the 50-year-old said. “Edgar and I, when we’ve done something, we want to move onto the next thing. All of those films, they have an arc and then they finish… We made Shaun of the Dead, and the sequel to that film is Hot Fuzz, and the sequel to Hot Fuzz is The World’s End. They’re a thematic trilogy rather than direct sequels.”

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Quentin Tarantino overestimated how much audiences would like Grindhouse

Quentin Tarantino has admitted he overestimated how much American audiences would appreciate his double feature Grindhouse.Back in 2007, the filmmaker released his action movie Death Proof, starring Kurt Russell and Rosario Dawson, alongside fellow dir…

Quentin Tarantino has admitted he overestimated how much American audiences would appreciate his double feature Grindhouse.

Back in 2007, the filmmaker released his action movie Death Proof, starring Kurt Russell and Rosario Dawson, alongside fellow director Robert Rodriguez’s horror Planet Terror.

He combined the two movies to make the double feature Grindhouse as his way of paying homage to 1970s exploitation films that were shown in now-defunct ‘grindhouse’ theatres in the U.S., and decided to release just Death Proof in the U.K.

However, he told Empire magazine that he’s since realised he misjudged just how much American audiences would understand his tribute to low-budget horror movies.

“With Grindhouse, I think me and Robert just felt that people had a little more of a concept of the history of double features and exploitation movies,” Tarantino explained. “No, they didn’t. At all. They had no idea what the f**k they were watching. It meant nothing to them, alright, what we were doing.

“So that was a case of being a little too cool for school. But as far as the movie playing in England as the movie, I think people took it okay.”

The Once Upon a Time in Hollywood director then recalled going to see Death Proof in London on opening night with Baby Driver director Edgar Wright and being “humbled” by the empty cinema.

“And we walk in the theatre and there’s about 13 people in there. On the opening 8.30 show, alright?” he laughed. “That was a rather humbling experience. But we sat down and watched it and had a good time.

“Edgar was like, ‘That was very impressive. I think I would have turned around and walked out of there. The fact you said f**k it and sat down, I admired that.'”

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Edgar Wright set to direct Set My Heart to Five

Edgar Wright is attached to direct an adaptation of the upcoming sci-fi novel Set My Heart to Five. The Baby Driver director has signed up to helm the adaptation of Simon Stephenson’s upcoming novel about a robot learning to love, which is scheduled t…

Edgar Wright is attached to direct an adaptation of the upcoming sci-fi novel Set My Heart to Five.

The Baby Driver director has signed up to helm the adaptation of Simon Stephenson’s upcoming novel about a robot learning to love, which is scheduled to be released later this year via HarperCollins imprints Hanover Square Press in the U.S. and 4th Estate Books in the U.K.

According to both The Hollywood Reporter and Deadline, Set My Heart to Five is “set in an all-too-human 2054” and follows Jared, an android which undergoes an emotional awakening and embarks on a quest to convince humans that he and his kind should be permitted to feel.

The mission, sparked in part by Jared’s introduction to ’80s and ’90s movies, leads to an adventure across the West Coast of America, with Jared being determined to meet his creator and write a film script that will change the world.

Executives at Working Title Films, Focus Features, and Compete Fiction Pictures teamed up to acquire the film rights to the novel. Stephenson is set to adapt his own manuscript.

Wright, who is also known for Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, is a frequent collaborator with the producers at Working Title and they worked together recently on Last Night in Soho, the psychological horror film starring Thomasin McKenzie, Anya Taylor-Joy, and Matt Smith. It is currently scheduled to hit cinemas in September.

The British director has numerous projects in the pipeline, including a documentary about cult pop duo Sparks and animated movie Shadows. He has also written the first draft of a script for a Baby Driver sequel.

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Edgar Wright pleads with fans to support cinemas amid coronavirus crisis

Baby Driver director Edgar Wright has urged fans to support their local cinemas through the coronavirus crisis in a new article for Empire magazine.Cinemas in the U.K. and many parts of the U.S. closed their doors this week due to restrictions on socia…

Baby Driver director Edgar Wright has urged fans to support their local cinemas through the coronavirus crisis in a new article for Empire magazine.

Cinemas in the U.K. and many parts of the U.S. closed their doors this week due to restrictions on social gatherings put in place to slow the spread of the virus.

Edgar fears the loss of business could lead to the permanent closure of many independent or small theatre chains, and so asked movie fans to support their favourite venues through hard times by buying memberships or gift cards.

“One way of showing your unwavering support is to become a member of your favourite cinema,” he wrote. “After you’ve read this, why not buy a membership for yourself, or for someone close to you. Buy some gift cards. Donate where you can.”

He went on to ask those with memberships not to cancel or ask for a refund, adding, “You’ll feel better for having helped now than if you later found your local church of cinema had been forced to close for good.”

The Shaun of the Dead director went on to reveal he had bought memberships for several cinemas he visits and asked those who can afford it to consider doing the same to protect cinema staff’s jobs.

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Simon Pegg and Nick Frost revive Shaun of the Dead roles for coronavirus warning

Simon Pegg and Nick Frost have reworked a scene from their 2004 comedy Shaun of the Dead to urge the general public to stay safe during the coronavirus outbreak.In the new video, which was posted on social media on Thursday, the duo parody the scene fr…

Simon Pegg and Nick Frost have reworked a scene from their 2004 comedy Shaun of the Dead to urge the general public to stay safe during the coronavirus outbreak.

In the new video, which was posted on social media on Thursday, the duo parody the scene from Edgar Wright’s satirical apocalyptic comedy in which their characters, Shaun and Ed, discuss how they plan to hide out at their local pub, The Winchester, to try and avoid a zombie outbreak.

In the clip, Frost asks Pegg what the plan is for the current Covid-19 outbreak, prompting the pair to share a series of jokes and references to the hit movie during the video call.

The actors then devise a situation where they “follow the (National Health Service’s) guidelines to the letter”, and avoid bars and restaurants to abide by the social distancing measures implemented to curb the spread of the virus.

“Don’t go to the Winchester. Especially if it’s closed… if you can, stay at home, have a cup of tea and wait for this to all blow over,” Pegg insisted, reworking one of his famous lines from the comedy film to encourage people to self-isolate.

The duo also urges the general public to look out for one another as the coronavirus pandemic sweeps across the world, reminding viewers: “We’re all in this together.”

“Don’t be selfish, look after each other, (and) give someone a call if you think they might be lonely,” Pegg added.

The Star Trek actor also explained the omission of Ed’s problematic dialogue from the original Shaun of the Dead script.

During the original phone call, Frost’s character tells Shaun, “Alright, gay!”, which prompted some disappointed fans to accuse the film of being homophobic.

“I know it’s 2020 but the original joke wasn’t intended to sound as homophobic, it was more a comment on the absurdity of straight male appropriation of homophobic signifiers in order to denote their aversion to the emotional canvas,” Pegg clarified.

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