Elisabeth Moss nervous to play real-life writer Shirley Jackson in new film

Elisabeth Moss was “a little nervous” playing famed author Shirley Jackson in new movie Shirley because she had never played a real person before.In Josephine Decker’s drama, The Handmaid’s Tale actress stars as The Haunting of Hill House autho…

Elisabeth Moss was “a little nervous” playing famed author Shirley Jackson in new movie Shirley because she had never played a real person before.

In Josephine Decker’s drama, The Handmaid’s Tale actress stars as The Haunting of Hill House author Jackson, alongside Michael Stuhlbarg as her professor husband Stanley Edgar Hyman. The fictional story follows a young couple, Fred and Rose (Logan Lerman and Odessa Young) who move into the famous author’s home and become fodder for her next novel.

In an interview with Collider, Elisabeth admitted she had some concerns about the role because it was her first time playing someone well known.

“It’s the first time that I’ve played a significant historical figure… that everybody knows. I think that was the challenge for me. It was a little frightening. I was a little nervous about that,” she confessed. “I’m not really that interested in doing research and stuff, and I had to do all of this research, all of a sudden, and approach it in a completely different way… That was the thing that was new for me, and definitely a challenge.”

The 37-year-old spent hours conducting research by listening to recordings of Shirley and reading letters between the author and her husband, but after a while she decided to let it all go and focus on the fictionalised version depicted in the script.

“The research into who Shirley was laid the groundwork. That was the bedrock of it. And then, at one point, I remember saying to Michael, right before we started, ‘Now, I think we have to let it go,’” she recalled. “And so, we both decided that we were going to do our own Shirley and Stanley, and this was gonna be our own version of them. You have to forgive yourself a little bit. It’s the only way that you can actually proceed without fear.”

Shirley is available on Hulu in the U.S. now.

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Elisabeth Moss ‘blown away’ by Shirley script

Elisabeth Moss was “blown away” by the script for Shirley and believed it offered her the “role of a lifetime”.In Josephine Decker’s drama, The Handmaid’s Tale actress stars as real-life author Shirley Jackson, alongside Michael Stuhlbarg a…

Elisabeth Moss was “blown away” by the script for Shirley and believed it offered her the “role of a lifetime”.

In Josephine Decker’s drama, The Handmaid’s Tale actress stars as real-life author Shirley Jackson, alongside Michael Stuhlbarg as her professor husband Stanley Edgar Hyman. The fictional story follows a young couple, Fred and Rose (Logan Lerman and Odessa Young) who move into the famous author’s home and become fodder for her next novel.

And when Moss first read the screenplay, she knew the role was extraordinary but wasn’t sure if she would get the honour.

“Sarah Gubbins wrote this script that was honestly one of the best pieces of writing I’ve ever seen and I was blown away. And I was like, ‘Well, this is one of those roles of a lifetime kind of things,’ you know?” she told The Playlist. “And I didn’t know whether or not they wanted me in the movie, and I was really young for Shirley. At the time, I was like 36. So, I kind of waited hopefully that they would pick me and then they did… I’ll never forget that moment when I found out they were going to offer it to me.”

The 37-year-old has never played such a well-known character before, and she didn’t have much material to help her prepare as there is no video footage of The Haunting of Hill House writer, who was a reclusive woman.

“There’s just something you can get from watching somebody actually speak and seeing their face that is really helpful,” Moss explained. “I had two recordings, I believe, and one of them was her reading (short story) The Lottery. So, I had that to go on for her voice and her accent and then pictures.”

Jackson passed away in 1965 at the age of 48.

Shirley is available digitally now.

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Elisabeth Moss reuniting with Handmaid’s Tale director

Elisabeth Moss is set to reunite with The Handmaid’s Tale director Daina Reid for a new thriller.The 37-year-old actress has signed on to work alongside Reid on Run Rabbit Run, an Australian project that has been described as a modern-day ghost story…

Elisabeth Moss is set to reunite with The Handmaid’s Tale director Daina Reid for a new thriller.

The 37-year-old actress has signed on to work alongside Reid on Run Rabbit Run, an Australian project that has been described as a modern-day ghost story.

In the movie, Moss will play a fertility doctor who is forced to challenge her strong views on life and death after realising her young daughter, Mia, is behaving strangely. In the process of tackling her family woes, the doctor will also be forced to confront a ghost from her own past and re-evaluate her core beliefs.

Deadline reports that as well as starring in Run Rabbit Run, Moss will produce the film, alongside her partner Lindsey McManus. Anna McLeish and Sarah Shaw from Carver Films will also produce. The film has been penned by Hannah Kent, who wrote the script from an original concept developed with Carver Films.

Producer and sales agent XYZ Films will launch world sales for the thriller at the Cannes virtual market, which is scheduled to run from June 22 to 26.

Moss has also hinted other reunions may be afoot, after teasing that the stars of her iconic TV show Mad Men have discussed meeting up.

When asked by Entertainment Tonight if the cast had considered reuniting via Zoom, Moss answered: “Oh, I don’t know. Maybe we have! I don’t know. Maybe we have had some discussions about this.

“I don’t think I am in a position to officially share anything. But, yes, we are aware that people are doing reunions and we’ve never done one, which is so crazy. We really all haven’t been together in five years. So I’ll just leave you with that.”

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Leigh Whannell worked hard to scare audiences with The Invisible Man

Director Leigh Whannell had to make The Invisible Man more mysterious because modern audiences are “harder to scare”.The 43-year-old Australian filmmaker, who also wrote the adaptation of H.G. Wells’ 1897 classic novel, chose to centre his film on do…

Director Leigh Whannell had to make The Invisible Man more mysterious because modern audiences are “harder to scare”.

The 43-year-old Australian filmmaker, who also wrote the adaptation of H.G. Wells’ 1897 classic novel, chose to centre his film on domestic abuse in an effort to terrify modern cinemagoers.

The original science fiction novel followed the story of Griffin, a reclusive scientist who has devoted himself to inventing a way to become invisible, while Whannell’s movie focuses on the perspective of Cecilia Kass, played by Elisabeth Moss, who tries to escape her abusive boyfriend, wealthy scientist Adrian Griffin.

And when asked why he centred the story on the victim of the Invisible Man, the writer and director said he wanted to avoid concentrating on the same themes that Wells did in his novel.

“I just felt like the original novel was more of a character study. It was about how this person’s experiment on themselves drove them to madness, which is really interesting,” he told Yahoo.

“I think there was a lot psychologically that Wells could’ve gone into,” Whannell added, before admitting that he restructured the movie’s themes to try and scare modern-day audiences.

“It’s hard to scare them. It’s hard to out-think them and so immediately, I thought, ‘I have to make the Invisible Man more mysterious than he’s been in the past,'” he shared.

The Invisible Man, also starring Oliver Jackson-Cohen and Storm Reid, is in cinemas now.

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Leigh Whannell prefers to create practical scare effects

The Invisible Man director Leigh Whannell prefers to use practical effects instead of computer-generated ones because he likes to be able to tell if a scare works during the shoot.The Saw co-creator’s latest project is a modern adaptation of H.G. Wells…

The Invisible Man director Leigh Whannell prefers to use practical effects instead of computer-generated ones because he likes to be able to tell if a scare works during the shoot.

The Saw co-creator’s latest project is a modern adaptation of H.G. Wells’ classic novel, which stars Elisabeth Moss as Cecilia Kass, a woman haunted by her abusive ex, who has managed to develop technology to make himself invisible.

Oliver Jackson-Cohen, who plays her ex Adrian Griffin, or his stunt double wore a green suit on set and would then be edited out in post-production, so Whannell was determined to make the scares and stunts happen so the cast and crew could react to them in the moment.

“You know what’s awesome in scary movies is doing things in camera. I would hate to be doing a scare scene in a horror movie and (then) have to wait for the end result,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. “I would hate to have someone react to a tennis ball on a C-stand and wait five months for the monster to appear… I’ll always push, push, push to do it in camera on the set so that you get it.”

The Upgrade filmmaker compared landing a scare on a horror movie set to making sure a joke works on a comedy movie and explained that doing it practically meant he could tell when he had the perfect take.

“It needs to work in the room,” the filmmaker explained. “I don’t want to put it together in editing, and I need to get it right now on the set… You can just tell by the take that goes right. So, yeah, it was all practical and in camera with a little bit of CGI help at the end.”

The Invisible Man is cinemas now.

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Elisabeth Moss helped edit The Invisible Man script to ensure female perspective

Elisabeth Moss carefully read over Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man script to ensure it did right by the female point of view.The Handmaid’s Tale star appears in the upcoming movie as Cecilia Kass, who manages to escape an abusive relationship but so…

Elisabeth Moss carefully read over Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man script to ensure it did right by the female point of view.

The Handmaid’s Tale star appears in the upcoming movie as Cecilia Kass, who manages to escape an abusive relationship but soon finds herself being stalked by her ex, who has found a way to make himself invisible.

Speaking to Esquire magazine, Moss revealed the Saw filmmaker asked her to look over his screenplay, which is based on a novel by H. G. Wells, to make sure what he wrote felt accurate from a woman’s perspective.

“I mean, this was written by a man. He wrote it brilliantly. It’s a beautiful script and what’s on the screen is very, very close to what he wrote. But he also had the intelligence to ask me, as soon as I was cast: ‘Can you please tell me what I did wrong here? What did I miss? You’re a woman, you’re coming at this from a completely different perspective. What can I put in here that will be true to being a female?'” she recalled.

“Most men that I’ve dealt with, and worked with, have that frame of mind. So, I think that is important, and I think that most smart men know that. But there are some dummies out there.”

Moss

She also revealed that Whannell spoke to victims of domestic abuse to help inform his script.

“Leigh had already spoken to victims of abuse, so he shared what he had learned with me. And I’ve done my own research over the years, especially with Handmaid’s Tale. So, I’ve been, unfortunately, looking at it for a while,” the 37-year-old explained.

The Invisible Man hits cinemas from Friday.

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Taika Waititi: ‘Michael Fassbender is a comic revelation’

Taika Waititi believes Michael Fassbender should stop doing dramas because he is a “comic revelation”.The New Zealand filmmaker has completed production on the upcoming sports comedy Next Goal Wins, which follows the true story of unorthodox Dutch-Amer…

Taika Waititi believes Michael Fassbender should stop doing dramas because he is a “comic revelation”.

The New Zealand filmmaker has completed production on the upcoming sports comedy Next Goal Wins, which follows the true story of unorthodox Dutch-American coach Thomas Rongen, played by Fassbender, who tries to help the American Samoa football team, considered one of the weakest football teams in the world, qualify for the 2014 FIFA World Cup tournament.

And Waititi is overjoyed with the movie, which also stars Elisabeth Moss, Armie Hammer, and Rhys Darby, and told Deadline that it was one of the best experiences of his life.

“It’s one of the happiest shoots I’ve ever been on. It’s a 99 per cent Polynesian cast; Michael Fassbender is a comic revelation,” he shared. “I think he should just stop doing dramas from now on because he’s so funny, and so good at improvising. To me, it was a real revelation.”

The 44-year-old, who recently landed two Academy Award nominations for his satire Jojo Rabbit, co-wrote the screenplay with Iain Morris, and filming took place in Hawaii last year.

Waititi also shared that shooting Next Goal Wins, which is based on the 2014 documentary of the same name, was a totally different experience to that of his upcoming Thor blockbuster.

“With the Thor film, I can’t share much, for obvious reasons. We’re going to be writing all the way up until we shoot, and then throughout the shoot,” he explained.

Chris Hemsworth is reprising his role as the Norse god for Thor: Love and Thunder, alongside Tessa Thompson and Natalie Portman, while Christian Bale is rumoured to be playing the villain.

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Marc Jacobs releases Girl, Interrupted-inspired line in support of LGBTQ charity

Marc Jacobs has unveiled a capsule collection inspired by the movie Girl, Interrupted to help raise funds for an LGBTQ charity.To mark the 20th anniversary of the 1999 psychological drama starring Winona Ryder and Angelina Jolie, based on Susanna Kayse…

Marc Jacobs has unveiled a capsule collection inspired by the movie Girl, Interrupted to help raise funds for an LGBTQ charity.

To mark the 20th anniversary of the 1999 psychological drama starring Winona Ryder and Angelina Jolie, based on Susanna Kaysen’s 1993 memoir, the fashion designer has released three limited-edition items featuring graphics and iconography from the film.

Thirty per cent of sales from the hoodie, T-shirt, and gym pant will go directly to The Trevor Project, a non-profit organisation dedicated to suicide prevention among LGBTQ youth.

Taking to Instagram, Jacobs re-posted a note penned by writer and photographer Ava Nirui about the initiative.

“20 YEARS OF GIRL, INTERRUPTED by MARC JACOBS merch pieces to commemorate the iconic Winona and Angelina film from 1999 are available now on marcjacobs.com,” she wrote. “Thank you to everyone who helped make it happen, especially @themarcjacobs. This project is dear to me – this movie changed the way I viewed mental health at a very young age, which was massively beneficial to me as I was in the process of growing up under the guidance of a close family member with clinical depression. It really helped me become more accepting of her and others impacted by mental illness. I’m happy to have done this project with such an important organisation.”

At the end of the post, the designer added: “THANK YOU AVA @avanope I’m so proud of this. GRATEFUL to you for giving life to this project. Love, Marc.”

For the accompanying campaign, model Adut Akech was photographed by Tina Tyrell and styled by Andrew Sauceda.

Items in the collection are priced from $95 to $165 (£72 – £125).

Girl, Interrupted, directed by James Mangold, also starred Brittany Murphy, Whoopi Goldberg, Elisabeth Moss, and Vanessa Redgrave.

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Elizabeth Banks to direct and star in Invisible Woman

Elizabeth Banks has signed on to direct and star in Invisible Woman. The actress and moviemaker is following up Charlie’s Angels, her recent directorial effort, by directing, starring and producing Invisible Woman, which is based on her own original p…

Elizabeth Banks has signed on to direct and star in Invisible Woman.

The actress and moviemaker is following up Charlie’s Angels, her recent directorial effort, by directing, starring and producing Invisible Woman, which is based on her own original pitch to executives at Universal Pictures, according to Deadline.

Banks will produce alongside her husband Max Handelman for their Brownstone Productions banner from a script written by The Girl on the Train’s Erin Cressida Wilson. She will also reportedly play the character who turns invisible.

The project is completely different and separate from the upcoming psychological horror The Invisible Man, which stars Elisabeth Moss as a widow of an abusive husband who fears he might still be around. That film, directed by Leigh Whannell, is set for release in February.

Universal was known for its monster movies between the 1920s and 1950s, with films such as Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, and Creature from the Black Lagoon.

Studio executives hoped to reboot these films and create a shared universe similar to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but they abandoned that idea after 2017’s The Mummy was a box office failure. They subsequently decided to focus on individual, original monster stories that have less connection between films.

As such, Last Christmas’ Paul Feig is writing and directing a monster movie titled Dark Army from his own pitch and Rocketman’s Dexter Fletcher is helming Renfield, a new take on Dracula’s henchman.

Banks made her directorial debut with Pitch Perfect 2 in 2015 and followed it up with the recent Charlie’s Angels, starring Kristen Stewart, Ella Balinska and Naomi Scott. She is also attached to direct TV movie The Greater Good.

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Kirsten Dunst replacing Elisabeth Moss in The Power of the Dog

Kirsten Dunst is replacing Elisabeth Moss in upcoming Netflix movie, The Power of the Dog.The groundbreaking study was funded by bosses at South Korean cosmetics company Coreana Cosmetics and is said to be the first to find a link between airborne poll…

Kirsten Dunst is replacing Elisabeth Moss in upcoming Netflix movie, The Power of the Dog.

The groundbreaking study was funded by bosses at South Korean cosmetics company Coreana Cosmetics and is said to be the first to find a link between airborne pollutants and loss of hair.

Researchers tested the effect of dust and fuel particles on human scalp cells and found that exposure to common pollutants reduced the levels of four proteins responsible for hair growth and hair retention.

It also suggested that those living in those living in cities are at greater risk of going bald due to the increase of airborne particles.

Experts exposed human follicle cells to different concentrations of fine dust particles and tiny diesel particles, and found decreased levels of beta-catenin, a protein involved in hair growth and the process of generation of follicles.

Three other proteins responsible for hair growth and retention – cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK2 – were also affected.

However, lead researcher Hyuk Chul Kwok noted that further investigation was needed to support the results.

“It is possible to hypothesise that at certain levels of exposure this could lead to baldness, but further population-based research needs to be undertaken to confirm this,” he suggested. “When the cells on the human scalp were exposed to common air pollutants created from burning fossil fuels, the proteins in the cells that are responsible for hair growth and hair retention were significantly reduced.”

The results were revealed at the 28th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress in Madrid, Spain.

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