Bong Joon Ho would love to make a musical

Bong Joon Ho would love his next movie to be a musical.The 50-year-old South Korean director won critical acclaim and a host of awards for his black comedy thriller Parasite, but now he’s keen to tackle a different kind of project. “I would love to mak…

Bong Joon Ho would love his next movie to be a musical.

The 50-year-old South Korean director won critical acclaim and a host of awards for his black comedy thriller Parasite, but now he’s keen to tackle a different kind of project.

“I would love to make a musical,” Bong told Empire magazine, noting that his take on the genre would be unique. “Characters would begin singing, then think, ‘Oh my God, f**k this, this is too cheesy,’ and stop suddenly.

“There are amazing musical films, like Singin’ in the Rain. But when I watch them, I feel very embarrassed and start blushing. So it would have to be… different.”

Bong stunned Hollywood when the critically-acclaimed Parasite won Best Picture, Best Director, Best International Film, and Best Original Screenplay at the Oscars last month.

The filmmaker may well live up to his promise of making a “different” musical, as he’s well-known for telling unusual stories on the big screen. His Academy Award-winning film followed members of a poor family who scheme to become employed by a wealthy one by infiltrating their household, while his 2017 movie Okja told the story of a young girl who raises a genetically modified giant pig.

And Bong’s timing could be perfect, as the musical genre is currently making a comeback in Hollywood, with Steven Spielberg’s remake of West Side Story and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s cinematic adaptation of his musical In the Heights both in the works.

Little Women director Greta Gerwig is also developing an original musical that focuses on tap dancing.

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Edgar Wright pleads with fans to support cinemas amid coronavirus crisis

Baby Driver director Edgar Wright has urged fans to support their local cinemas through the coronavirus crisis in a new article for Empire magazine.Cinemas in the U.K. and many parts of the U.S. closed their doors this week due to restrictions on socia…

Baby Driver director Edgar Wright has urged fans to support their local cinemas through the coronavirus crisis in a new article for Empire magazine.

Cinemas in the U.K. and many parts of the U.S. closed their doors this week due to restrictions on social gatherings put in place to slow the spread of the virus.

Edgar fears the loss of business could lead to the permanent closure of many independent or small theatre chains, and so asked movie fans to support their favourite venues through hard times by buying memberships or gift cards.

“One way of showing your unwavering support is to become a member of your favourite cinema,” he wrote. “After you’ve read this, why not buy a membership for yourself, or for someone close to you. Buy some gift cards. Donate where you can.”

He went on to ask those with memberships not to cancel or ask for a refund, adding, “You’ll feel better for having helped now than if you later found your local church of cinema had been forced to close for good.”

The Shaun of the Dead director went on to reveal he had bought memberships for several cinemas he visits and asked those who can afford it to consider doing the same to protect cinema staff’s jobs.

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Taraji P. Henson had to fight for stylists who understood her hair

Taraji P. Henson had to fight for stylists who understood her hair at the start of her career.The Empire star struggled to get the right people to manage her textured waves when she first started out in Hollywood so she used to do her own hair to make …

Taraji P. Henson had to fight for stylists who understood her hair at the start of her career.

The Empire star struggled to get the right people to manage her textured waves when she first started out in Hollywood so she used to do her own hair to make sure it wouldn’t get ruined.

“When nobody knew who I was, I had to take whatever (hairstylist) they gave me,” Taraji candidly shared to Allure. “I remember one time the stylist decided to put a root booster in my pressed hair. My roots looked like they were rising from the dead, honey.”

“The rest of my head was bone-straight with a curl at the end, like a helmet head, and I had to do a whole photo shoot like that. I tried to explain it to him, and he tried to fix it, but he just didn’t know how to,” she added, noting that she had already done her hair before the shoot in order to avoid her natural locks being damaged by a stylist who didn’t know how to treat them properly.

“Once I figured out (the hair thing) was an issue and I started rising in my career, I realised that I was just going to have to start fighting for the stylists I want,” the Oscar-nominated star explained. “And that’s what I started doing. The bigger my name got, the more people were like, ‘Just give her what she wants.'”

And now, the 49-year-old, who recently launched her own haircare line, TPH by Taraji, no longer worries about having to do her own hair to avoid dealing with an inexperienced hairstylist.

“At this point in my career, I don’t have to always show up to set with my hair already done,” Taraji stated.

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Taraji P. Henson’s friends turn to her for haircare advice

Taraji. P. Henson knew there was a market for her haircare products because her friends were always turning to her for advice. Earlier this year, the Empire actress launched her haircare line TPH by Taraji, which features formulas she created herself …

Taraji. P. Henson knew there was a market for her haircare products because her friends were always turning to her for advice.

Earlier this year, the Empire actress launched her haircare line TPH by Taraji, which features formulas she created herself to help women with dense hair or weaves clean all of their natural hair as well as their scalp.

She knew there was a market for her products and her applicator design because her friends would ask for her haircare advice and she received a positive response when they tested out her formulas.

“Often you have so many products and you just don’t know how to use them. But because I formulated these myself, I can tell you exactly what to do, how to use them, when to use them and what I do for my hair, because that’s what I was finding-people started taking to my hair,” she told Essence magazine. “When I would take the weaves out and show my hair, they were like, ‘Oh, my God. How did you do it? How did you do it?’ It would have been so hard for me to try to explain. I went on vacation with girlfriends and they had protective styles and were complaining about their scalps itching. I said, ‘Try this.’ I put the apparatus all together. They were like, ‘Oh, my God. I’ve never felt this.’ I was like, ‘I’m onto something.'”

Elsewhere in the interview, the 49-year-old candidly shared her thoughts on ageing, and said that while she enjoys looking youthful, she doesn’t always feel it.

“I know we all are enamoured and we’re in love with how ‘black don’t crack’, and we all love the youthfulness, and yes, I’m pushing 50 and we that b**ch and all of that,” she continued. “Yes, that’s great, but let’s be real. There are things that happen to us physically and we get so caught up in the aesthetics that we really never talk about peri-menopause, menopause. And how that directly affects you mentally. Depression, lows and you not knowing where this s**t is coming from.”

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Taraji P. Henson considered career in beauty before becoming an actress

Taraji P. Henson would have had a career in the beauty industry had she not become an actress.The Empire star is currently gearing up for the launch of her debut haircare line, TPH by Taraji, and in a new interview with People, revealed that if she had…

Taraji P. Henson would have had a career in the beauty industry had she not become an actress.

The Empire star is currently gearing up for the launch of her debut haircare line, TPH by Taraji, and in a new interview with People, revealed that if she hadn’t headed to Hollywood, she would be caring for people’s hair, skin, and nails instead.

“I know that if I didn’t go into acting, I would have been a cosmetologist,” she told the publication, adding that she has always taken her haircare seriously, so her followers on social media value her opinion. “My fans trust me.”

TPH by Taraji will be launching in Target stores across the U.S. at the end of January, and the Golden Globe-winning actress still can’t believe that her products will be on the shelves for customers to buy.

“It’s challenging when you have a dream, because you’ve got to sell it to the world,” the 49-year-old explained. “It’s so close, but so far away. And the buildup of having the nerve to say, ‘I’m going to do this one day,’ then making it happen is just like…wow.”

The 18-piece haircare line comes after 10 years of hard work from the mother-of-one, who started creating the products in her own kitchen.

And Taraji is particularly thrilled with the two scalp cleansers in her debut collection – the Never Salty scalp scrub and the Master Cleanse scalp wash – and she hopes that her products will help educate women with textured hair.

“Women think that just because you have your hair braided up under a weave or wig that you don’t have to (do anything else). But you have to take care of it,” she urged.

TPH by Taraji, priced from $5 to $15 (£4 – £12), is available in Target stores in the U.S. and online, from 29 January.

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Taraji P. Henson teases launch of haircare line

Taraji P. Henson has teased the launch of her new haircare line TPH by Taraji.The Empire star has been working for years on creating the perfect debut collection, and now the 18-piece line, which caters for every hair type, is almost ready. “Guys, TPH …

Taraji P. Henson has teased the launch of her new haircare line TPH by Taraji.

The Empire star has been working for years on creating the perfect debut collection, and now the 18-piece line, which caters for every hair type, is almost ready.

“Guys, TPH is coming. It’s coming, very soon. Stay tuned,” she teased in a short clip on Instagram.

TPH is divided into four categories, covering the basics of cleansing and care, repair, treatment stylers, and scalp-care products for textured, afro and curly hair.

At the heart of her haircare collection lies Taraji’s determination to avoid other women becoming embarrassed by their hair, and recalled a time when she was mortified when having her weave taken out at the salon.

“The first time I went to get the weave taken out, it smelled like mildew. I was so embarrassed. I was washing my hair, but wasn’t drying the weft,” she explained to Allure. “When you have a weave or an install, your hair is braided down, and then sometimes they sew a hair net down on top of that, and then they sew the hair tracks on top of that. My dilemma was how do I get to my scalp? How do I clean it? I didn’t ever want that mildew smell again.”

This incident inspired her to create the clarifying Master Cleanse, which is based on a homemade cleanser Taraji created to refresh her scalp when she wear weaves.

And the 49-year-old insisted that TPH is for every curly-haired woman, not just for those who wear weaves, with products such as the Never Salty Scalp Scrub ($13/£10), Honey Fresh shampoo ($10/£8) and Make It Rain conditioner ($10/£8) suitable for all.

TPH by Taraji is available now from the Target website and in stores from 29 January.

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Rami Malek took inspiration from Freddie Mercury when playing Bond villain

Rami Malek took inspiration from Freddie Mercury when playing a Bond villain in the upcoming No Time to Die.The 38-year-old bagged a Best Actor Oscar for his portrayal of the late Queen frontman in the musical biopic Bohemian Rhapsody earlier this year…

Rami Malek took inspiration from Freddie Mercury when playing a Bond villain in the upcoming No Time to Die.

The 38-year-old bagged a Best Actor Oscar for his portrayal of the late Queen frontman in the musical biopic Bohemian Rhapsody earlier this year, and he revealed that his performance as James Bond’s mysterious adversary Safin was heavily influenced by the flamboyant rocker.

“If I went in there and tried to make a carbon copy of someone, what joy or fun would that be for anybody? I guess that may be a lesson I learned from Mr. Mercury,” he told the January issue of Empire magazine.

“If it’s not original, then why bother? I’ve pocketed some things from some of my favourites. But I tried to every day imbue this character with something I thought made sense for the character, but might also at the same time be shocking and unnerving,” Rami added.

He also revealed that he teamed up with his Bohemian Rhapsody voice coach to achieve the perfect dialect for his mysterious Bond villain.

“I wanted to create something that we couldn’t quite peg from any particular part of the world,” he teased.

Daniel Craig returns for one final outing as the infamous MI6 super spy in No Time to Die, which will be released in April 2020.

The 25th instalment of the James Bond franchise is directed by True Detective’s Cary Joji Fukunaga and also stars Lashana Lynch, Lea Seydoux, Christoph Waltz, Ralph Fiennes, Naomie Harris, and Ben Whishaw.

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Martin Scorsese defends criticism of Marvel movies

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.Scorses…

Martin Scorsese has elaborated on his criticism of the Marvel movies in an opinion piece for The New York Times.

The Irishman director, 76, sparked a huge backlash by calling the movies “not cinema” in an interview with Britain’s Empire magazine.

Scorsese addressed the controversy in an article published in The New York Times on Monday, claiming he did not want to attack the artistry of those involved, but stating that they are not to his taste and are crowding other types of films out of cinemas.

“Many franchise films are made by people of considerable talent and artistry,” the movie legend wrote in his op-ed. “You can see it on the screen. The fact that the films themselves don’t interest me is a matter of personal taste and temperament.

“I know that if I were younger, if I’d come of age at a later time, I might have been excited by these pictures and maybe even wanted to make one myself. But I grew up when I did and I developed a sense of movies – of what they were and what they could be – that was as far from the Marvel universe as we on Earth are from Alpha Centauri.”

The director went on to describe his love of Alfred Hitchcock’s films and compared their spectacular set-pieces to current comic book blockbusters.

However, he also stated that modern blockbuster franchises are “market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption” – unlike those of auteur directors like Spike Lee, Kathryn Bigelow, or Paul Thomas Anderson.

Defending his decision to criticise Marvel, the famed director explained that even iconic auteurs like himself were struggling to get their films into cinemas – as he’d had to turn to Netflix to make his new gangster epic The Irishman.

“We have a theatrical window, which is great,” he complains. “Would I like the picture to play on more big screens for longer periods of time? Of course I would. But no matter whom you make your movie with, the fact is that the screens in most multiplexes are crowded with franchise pictures.”

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Martin Scorsese: ‘Marvel movies are not cinema’

Martin Scorsese has sparked outrage on social media by saying Marvel movies are “not cinema”.The Oscar-winning filmmaker, best known for his epic dramas such as Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Goodfellas and The Aviator, was asked about the hugely successful…

Martin Scorsese has sparked outrage on social media by saying Marvel movies are “not cinema”.

The Oscar-winning filmmaker, best known for his epic dramas such as Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Goodfellas and The Aviator, was asked about the hugely successful Marvel movies, which have raked in more than $8.5 billion (£6.9 billion) since 2008.

However, Scorsese was harsh in his response, and told Empire magazine that he had tried and failed to watch the films, and ended up feeling sorry for the Avengers stars, including Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, and Scarlett Johansson.

“I don’t see them. I tried, you know? But that’s not cinema. Honestly, the closest I can think of them, as well made as they are, with actors doing the best they can under the circumstances, is theme parks. It isn’t the cinema of human beings trying to convey emotional, psychological experiences to another human being,” he shared.

The 76-year-old is gearing up for the release of his highly-anticipated gangster epic, The Irishman, which brings together Hollywood legends Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, and longtime Scorsese collaborator, Joe Pesci.

Marvel Studios president and producer Kevin Feige previously opened up about the criticism his superhero movies had received and insisted that the studio were more concerned with pleasing cinemagoers than landing big awards.

“Maybe it’s easy to dismiss VFX or flying people or spaceships or billion dollar grosses. I think it is easy to say that you have already been awarded in a certain way,” Feige said last year. “(Alfred) Hitchcock never won best director, so it’s very nice, but it doesn’t mean everything. I would much rather be in a room full of engaged fans.”

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Taraji P. Henson meditates before red carpet events

Taraji P. Henson always meditates before she attends a Hollywood event. The Empire actress usually likes to take time out of her day to clear her mind and relax, and she has a specific ritual she carries out to calm her nerves prior to hitting the red …

Taraji P. Henson always meditates before she attends a Hollywood event.

The Empire actress usually likes to take time out of her day to clear her mind and relax, and she has a specific ritual she carries out to calm her nerves prior to hitting the red carpet.

“Meditation is always a big part of my day, especially before a red carpet,” Henson told Vogue.com. “I cleanse the space with crystals and sage first, then move onto sound healing vibrations to soothe any anxiety.”

Henson took Vogue reporters behind-the-scenes of her preparations ahead of the Emmys red carpet on Sunday, when she wore a pink gown with a red cape that took more than 200 hours to make by the Vera Wang team.

The 49-year-old explained that she likes to wear gowns by the designer because she uses the outfits as her armour.

“Red carpets are always a bit hectic, but that’s why I like to wear Vera Wang,” the actress added. “She builds the best dresses and always makes me feel like I can take on any carpet.”

The TV star styled her chin-length bob in tight waves, and Taraji admitted her hair has a difficult relationship with styling products.

“One of the problems I have is dealing with my hair and scalp and trying to keep them healthy after hours and hours of being under the heat on a weekly basis,” she shared. “I’m actually working on something to address that issue that is going launch very soon at TPH by Taraji! It will help all women feel as good as I do.”

In July, she announced she was working on a haircare line named TPH by Taraji but its launch date is currently unknown.

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