Eric Bana to write and direct biopic about biking hero Mike Hailwood

Eric Bana is to write, co-direct, and star in a biopic about motorcycle racing legend Mike ‘The Bike’ Hailwood. The Australian actor will write the screenplay, co-direct with Robert Connolly, and appear as late British biker Hailwood, who became one of…

Eric Bana is to write, co-direct, and star in a biopic about motorcycle racing legend Mike ‘The Bike’ Hailwood.

The Australian actor will write the screenplay, co-direct with Robert Connolly, and appear as late British biker Hailwood, who became one of the greatest motorsports racers ever after winning the Isle of Man race, one of the most treacherous driving courses, 12 times before his retirement in 1967.

The film will focus on Hailwood attempting to make a comeback after an 11-year hiatus by returning to the formidable race in 1978.

Bana’s Pick Up Truck Pictures and Connolly’s Arenamedia partnered together to secure the rights to Hailwood’s story from his family.

“We are absolutely thrilled that Eric Bana and Robert Connolly have taken Mike’s story to adapt into a feature film about his historic ‘comeback’ race win,” said Hailwood’s widow Pauline and their son David in a statement, according to Deadline. “We are delighted that Mike will be depicted by Eric Bana, an actor with an immense passion and knowledge of motorsports, Mike’s career, and a rider himself.”

Bana, who loves “all things two-wheeled, four-wheeled, and occasionally one-wheeled,” according to his Twitter bio, is reuniting with Connolly on the project. They previously worked together on The Dry, the upcoming adaptation of author Jane Harper’s novel of the same name.

Bana previously directed 2009 sports documentary, Love the Beast, which explores his love of motorsports, but the biopic will mark his first time directing a narrative feature film.

The 51-year-old, who is known for films such as Munich, Hulk, and The Time Traveler’s Wife, was previously seen on TV in the miniseries Dirty John alongside Connie Britton and Juno Temple.

© Cover Media

Charlie Hunnam blames ‘miscasting’ for King Arthur flop

Charlie Hunnam believes his 2017 movie King Arthur: Legend of the Sword flopped because a piece of miscasting “crippled” the storyline.The British actor played the titular character in Guy Ritchie’s 2017 fantasy drama, alongside Jude Law, Eric Bana and…

Charlie Hunnam believes his 2017 movie King Arthur: Legend of the Sword flopped because a piece of miscasting “crippled” the storyline.

The British actor played the titular character in Guy Ritchie’s 2017 fantasy drama, alongside Jude Law, Eric Bana and Djimon Hounsou, and the movie was critically panned and bombed at the box office.

During a recent radio interview with Andy Cohen on SiriusXM, Charlie revealed he’d like to revisit the film because the team encountered many problems during production, including a role being miscast.

“I’d like to go back to King Arthur because there’s a lot of things went wrong during that and a lot of things that were out of our control,” he candidly explained. “I just don’t think we ended up matching the aspiration – we just didn’t quite make the movie we wanted.”

When asked what was one of the biggest things to go wrong, the 39-year-old cryptically replied, “There was a piece of miscasting that ended up crippling the central storyline. It’s actually not in the film anymore.”

He didn’t divulge who was miscast in the movie.

Back in 2017, director Guy told Entertainment Weekly that his original cut of the movie was more than three hours long, but was hacked down to just over two hours before its release.

Elsewhere in the interview, the Sons of Anarchy star explained there was a plan to make King Arthur into a franchise if the first film had been a success.

“The idea was that if it was a success, we would’ve made several of those films, and I’m really captivated by the Arthurian legends and I just feel like we really missed an opportunity to tell a long-form story,” Charlie lamented.

The fantasy epic, which cost more than $175 million (£134 million) to produce, made just $146 million (£112 million) worldwide.

© Cover Media

Brad Pitt inspired to make better movies after starring in ‘disappointing’ Troy

Brad Pitt was inspired to make better movies after he was left “disappointed” by his 2004 film Troy.The epic action drama, directed by Wolfgang Petersen and co-starring Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom and Diane Kruger, followed the legendary story of the Gree…

Brad Pitt was inspired to make better movies after he was left “disappointed” by his 2004 film Troy.

The epic action drama, directed by Wolfgang Petersen and co-starring Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom and Diane Kruger, followed the legendary story of the Greek army, lead by Pitt’s character Achilles, who invaded the historical city of Troy.

In an interview with The New York Times, the 56-year-old admitted he was so disappointed by the film that it dramatically changed the way he decided future roles.

“It was really a turn on Troy. I was disappointed in it,” Pitt shared, adding that he was told to do Troy instead of a Coen Brothers film called To the White Sea, which never came to fruition.

“We had an opportunity to go, and then it was shut down. Then another interesting opportunity arose, and instead I was talked into: ‘No, you need to be doing this other thing. You can get to your art project later.’ I ended up taking that advice,” he lamented.

He later confessed that he was contractually obligated to star in Troy after pulling out of another unnamed movie for Warner Bros.

“I was put in Troy. It wasn’t painful, but I realised that the way that movie was being told was not how I wanted it to be. I made my own mistakes in it,” he explained, noting that he had become “spoiled” working with David Fincher on Fight Club in 1999.

Despite Troy’s huge box office success, Pitt was frustrated with the lack of depth his character Achilles had.

“Every shot was like, ‘Here’s the hero!’ There was no mystery,” he complained. “So about that time I made a decision that I was only going to invest in quality stories, for lack of a better term. It was a distinct shift that led to the next decade of films.”

© Cover Media