Seth Rogen helped Judd Apatow rewrite Bad Boys II

Seth Rogen has revealed he helped Judd Apatow rewrite Michael Bay’s action sequel Bad Boys II.The epic follow-up to 1995’s Bad Boys, starring Will Smith and Martin Lawrence, has become a cult classic since its release in 2003, thanks to its enormous se…

Seth Rogen has revealed he helped Judd Apatow rewrite Michael Bay’s action sequel Bad Boys II.

The epic follow-up to 1995’s Bad Boys, starring Will Smith and Martin Lawrence, has become a cult classic since its release in 2003, thanks to its enormous set-pieces, a fast-paced storyline, and plenty of comedy gags.

On Tuesday, days before the release of Bad Boys For Life, film writer Eric Vespe debated the pros and cons of the hit sequel with his followers, which prompted Rogen to join in and make his surprising confession.

“I helped rewrite bad boys 2,” he replied, leading to scores of Twitter users demanding more information from the Long Shot star.

Rogen went on to explain in a follow-up tweet that he and longtime writing partner Evan Goldberg were hired by director and friend Apatow to help him out with the script.

“Judd was rewriting it and me and Evan were broke so he gave us a bit of money to help,” he added. “I don’t remember much but we all definitely wrote the joke where they don’t know the words to the song, and where Martin shoots the machine gun in the car by accident. And probably many more…”

The script for Bad Boys II was originally written by Ron Shelton, who penned other classics such as White Men Can’t Jump, along with CSI: Crime Scene Investigation writer Jerry Stahl. Apatow was not officially credited for his work.

Apatow first began working with Rogen and Goldberg on the short-lived 2001 Fox sitcom Undeclared, in which the Knocked Up star appeared in alongside Jay Baruchel and Charlie Hunnam.

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Seth Rogen to star as a pickle maker in new comedy

Seth Rogen is set to star in an untitled comedy movie about a pickle maker.The untitled project is based on a 2013 New Yorker novella Sell Out, and the actor will play a character called Herschel Greenbaum who falls into a factory pickle barrel and is …

Seth Rogen is set to star in an untitled comedy movie about a pickle maker.

The untitled project is based on a 2013 New Yorker novella Sell Out, and the actor will play a character called Herschel Greenbaum who falls into a factory pickle barrel and is brined for 100 years, only to emerge unaged into hipster Brooklyn where he meets his grandson Ben (also played by Rogen). Cinematographer Brandon Trost – a frequent collaborator with Rogen, including the films This Is the End, Neighbors and The Interview – is in talks to make his directorial debut through the project, working from a script written by Simon Rich, who wrote the original story.

Sony are helming the picture, while Rogen, Superbad screenwriter and producer Evan Goldberg and James Weaver will produce the film through their Point Grey Pictures banner. The trio previously teamed up to produce another Sony comedy: 2016’s Sausage Party, which went on to be a smash hit, making $98 million (£75 million) in the U.S.

Alexandria McAtee and Rich will executive produce and production on the film is set to start 29 October (18) in Pittsburgh.

After starring in and producing the Oscar-nominated The Disaster Artist in 2017, Rogen has since had a role in Kristen Bell’s Like Father, as well as upcoming movies Flarsky – a comedy alongside Charlize Theron – and The Lion King, in which he lends his voice to the character of Pumbaa.

However, this year he has also produced Blockers, starring Leslie Mann, and Netflix’s Game Over, Man!, as well as Good Boys, which is set for a 2019 release.

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Jonah Hill inspired to write and direct own movie by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg

Jonah Hill was inspired to make his directorial debut Mid90s after watching his pals Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg create their own material.The Wolf of Wall Street actor found fame in 2007 movie Superbad, which was written by Seth and his collaborator …

Jonah Hill was inspired to make his directorial debut Mid90s after watching his pals Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg create their own material.

The Wolf of Wall Street actor found fame in 2007 movie Superbad, which was written by Seth and his collaborator Evan, who have also written Pineapple Express and The Green Hornet and directed films such as The Interview and This Is the End, starring Jonah.

Jonah admits watching the duo create their own work inspired him to make his own project, but it took ten years for the idea to come to life, with Mid90s set for release in October (18).

“I got to watch Seth and Evan and (Superbad director) Greg Mottola make something that was truly what they wanted to make. It was their voice, their ethic, their aesthetic, their emotions,” he told New York magazine.

Mid90s is a coming-of-age tale about an 11-year-old skateboarder named Stevie growing up in ’90s Los Angeles.

The 34-year-old started out writing a different movie, about a grown man with flashbacks to his young skateboarding days, but he changed it up after receiving advice from Her director Spike Jonze.

“(Spike said), ‘You look uninterested when you’re talking about the main story, and you light up when you’re talking about when they’re skating. That should be what you write about,'” Jonah recalled.

He also sought guidance from Ethan Coen, one half of the Coen brothers directing duo, after bumping into him at a restaurant the day before the Mid90s shoot began, and he told him “just try and enjoy” the experience.

The 21 Jump Street star also called up his Wolf of Wall Street director Martin Scorsese for some pointers and ended up going to his house for a four-hour conversation.

All that advice and preparation culminated in Jonah feeling like he’d done his homework when he arrived on set the first day.

“When I pulled up to the set on the first day of Mid90s, and the cameras were there, and the trucks were there, and the kids were in their costumes, and I was behind the camera, I thought, ‘This is home’. I knew this is what I wanted out of my life,” he gushed. “And I didn’t feel like it was given to me. I felt like I had worked for it.”

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