Tess Holliday: ‘People can’t look past my size’

Tess Holliday struggles to be heard when she’s discussing gaining or losing weight because people “can’t see past” her size.The model was frustrated when she began hearing other social media influencers complain about putting on weight during the coron…

Tess Holliday struggles to be heard when she’s discussing gaining or losing weight because people “can’t see past” her size.

The model was frustrated when she began hearing other social media influencers complain about putting on weight during the coronavirus lockdown, and took to Instagram to vent her concerns in a video back in March.

However, Tess has now admitted she didn’t feel like she was being taken seriously when discussing diets and healthy eating habits because of her size.

“The first week we were in quarantine, I posted a funny video being like, ‘I’m so tired of hearing people complain about the weight that they might gain. Who cares? We’re in an actual pandemic.’ And that’s still how I feel,” she told Self magazine. “I’m in an interesting position because I know that I am fat, I know that I am larger than what people consider acceptably plus-size, so when people see someone that looks like me – that is my size – talking about loving yourself and it being fatphobic, people can’t look past my size.”

Elsewhere in the interview, the 34-year-old, real name Ryann Maegen Hoven, opened up about taking care of her mental health while in self-isolation at her home in Los Angeles with her three-year-old son Bowie.

“I try to create a checklist each day of things that I need to do. Some of that is work, some of it is personal goals,” Tess explained. “I’ve been journaling. I have been spending time with my little one outside… I’m also taking time for myself before I go to bed.”

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Gucci to depart from Fashion Week calendar

Gucci will no longer present collections as part of the conventional Fashion Week calendar.While the Italian luxury label has traditionally participated in Milan Fashion Week events, in a series of Instagram posts uploaded over the weekend, creative di…

Gucci will no longer present collections as part of the conventional Fashion Week calendar.

While the Italian luxury label has traditionally participated in Milan Fashion Week events, in a series of Instagram posts uploaded over the weekend, creative director Alessandro Michele announced that he plans to go “seasonless” and will unveil just two lines per year.

“I will abandon the worn-out ritual of seasonalities and shows to regain a new cadence, closer to my expressive call. We will meet just twice a year, to share the chapters of a new story,” he wrote. “Irregular, joyful and absolutely free chapters, which will be written blending rules and genres, feeding on new spaces, linguistic codes, and communication platforms.”

Michele, who has served as head designer at the brand since January 2015, went on to explain that he has had a lot of time to reflect on the industry during the coronavirus lockdown. Accordingly, he has decided the idea of presenting ranges at particular times of year, including cruise and pre-collections, to be rather “stale”.

“That is why I decided to build a new path, away from deadlines that the industry consolidated and, above all, away from an excessive performativity that today really has no raison d’etre (reason for existence). It’s a foundational act, audacious but necessary, that aims at building a new creative universe. A universe that essentialises itself in the subtraction of events and that oxygenates through the multiplication of sense,” the 48-year-old commented, before insisting the Covid-19 pandemic has not dampened his creativity. “Now that we are still apart, my love for fashion burns. Our species, after all, is like that: we live like crazy in the throes of what is missing.”

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John Varvatos files for bankruptcy

Executives at John Varvatos have filed for bankruptcy protection amid a major restructure.Founded by designer John Varvatos in 1999, the luxury menswear retailer offers a range of apparel, accessories, and fragrances, and over the years, has become kno…

Executives at John Varvatos have filed for bankruptcy protection amid a major restructure.

Founded by designer John Varvatos in 1999, the luxury menswear retailer offers a range of apparel, accessories, and fragrances, and over the years, has become known for featuring musicians and bands such as Nick Jonas, Iggy Pop, Alice Cooper, Dave Matthews, The Roots, and Green Day in its campaigns.

However, bosses announced on Wednesday that they had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, and as part of the restructure, would be selling the business to Lion Capital, an existing investor.

“The agreements with Lion represent a critical step in our process to transform our business to drive long-term, sustainable growth,” Varvatos said in a statement. “We have taken decisive action to respond to the challenges that all retailers face in the present environment and we remain extremely confident that our brand, celebrating its 20th year in business, will emerge even stronger. We have a passionate team, a fierce global consumer following and a commitment to our customers, whom we expect to serve for many years to come.”

According to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, a Chapter 11 filing permits reorganisation under the bankruptcy laws. Typically, the John Varvatos boutiques would be able to remain open, but the coronavirus crisis has curtailed any such plans.

“Along with the rest of the luxury retail industry, John Varvatos Enterprises has been greatly impacted by the negative effects of the coronavirus pandemic,” a spokesperson added. “In response to the rapid and exponential spread of Covid-19 as well as relevant governmental orders, the company’s leadership took difficult yet prudent steps to temporarily close all store locations and conserve cash. The restructuring and related agreements represent the effort to continue the company’s legacy and to reposition the reorganised entity for long-term success.”

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Imaan Hammam pleased to see more diversity backstage at fashion shows

Imaan Hammam has praised industry leaders for beginning to hire a diverse array of creatives to work backstage at fashion shows.The Dutch model, who is of Moroccan and Egyptian descent, has previously discussed how she was often the only black person t…

Imaan Hammam has praised industry leaders for beginning to hire a diverse array of creatives to work backstage at fashion shows.

The Dutch model, who is of Moroccan and Egyptian descent, has previously discussed how she was often the only black person to be cast in runway events when she was first starting out in 2013.

However, in a new interview for the May 2020 issue of U.S. Elle magazine, Imaan shared that she has seen great strides made within the industry of late.

“When I first started, nobody knew what to do with my skin or my hair,” she insisted. “I stressed out before every show; it was actually pretty awful. Now I’m happy (to report) there are great make-up artists and hairstylists who know what they’re doing… And I feel more empowered to speak out about the way I was treated sometimes backstage. Modelling has gotten a lot better.”

But despite praising fashion executives, Imaan is adamant there is still a lot of work that needs to be done.

“You know what I want to see next?” the 23-year-old questioned. “More female photographers! It’s still a bunch of men backstage! We also need more people of colour in casting, and we need more designers of colour.”

Elsewhere in the chat, Imaan opened up about her collaboration with the team at Frame on a denim capsule collection that was released earlier this year, and also hinted at her plans to get more involved in fashion design.

“Do you know what it’s like to finally use what I’ve learned from Donatella Versace, and from Stella McCartney, who sets such a great example with sustainability?” she smiled. “Designing is like a dream. I’m in love with the process.”

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J.Crew files for bankruptcy protection

Executives at J.Crew have filed for bankruptcy protection amid a major restructure.On Monday morning, bosses at the American retailer announced that they had filed a series of customary “first day” motions with the Bankruptcy Court so they can maintain…

Executives at J.Crew have filed for bankruptcy protection amid a major restructure.

On Monday morning, bosses at the American retailer announced that they had filed a series of customary “first day” motions with the Bankruptcy Court so they can maintain operations while undergoing the process and to help facilitate a “smooth transition” into Chapter 11.

According to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, a Chapter 11 filing permits reorganisation under the bankruptcy laws. Typically, the J.Crew boutiques and the brand’s Madewell stores would be able to remain open, but the coronavirus crisis has curtailed any such plans.

“This agreement with our lenders represents a critical milestone in the ongoing process to transform our business with the goal of driving long-term, sustainable growth for J.Crew and further enhancing Madewell’s growth momentum,” said Jan Singer, chief executive officer, J.Crew Group. “Throughout this process, we will continue to provide our customers with the exceptional merchandise and service they expect from us, and we will continue all day-to-day operations, albeit under these extraordinary Covid-19-related circumstances. As we look to reopen our stores as quickly and safely as possible, this comprehensive financial restructuring should enable our business and brands to thrive for years to come.”

As part of the Transaction Support Agreement (TSA), the company’s lenders will convert approximately $1.65 billion of its debt into equity.

In addition, Madewell will remain part of J.Crew Group, with Libby Wadle to continue in her role as chief executive officer.

“J.Crew and Madewell are two classic American brands with deeply loyal customers. We look forward to supporting Jan, Libby and the management team to recognise their full potential. The significant deleveraging contemplated by this agreement, coupled with J.Crew Group’s strategy to strengthen its robust e-commerce platform to drive continued growth in its direct-to-consumer segment, will position the company for future success,” insisted Kevin Ulrich, chief executive officer of Anchorage Capital Group.

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Burberry launching eco-conscious capsule collection

Burberry has unveiled a new capsule collection made from sustainable materials.In time for Earth Day 2020, executives at the British heritage label have unveiled the ReBurberry Edit, a 26-piece line of items from the spring/summer 2020 range. Items inc…

Burberry has unveiled a new capsule collection made from sustainable materials.

In time for Earth Day 2020, executives at the British heritage label have unveiled the ReBurberry Edit, a 26-piece line of items from the spring/summer 2020 range. Items include trench coats, parkas, capes, and accessories created from ECONYL – a recycled nylon made from regenerated fishing nets, fabric scraps, and industrial plastic, as well as a collection of eyewear crafted from pioneering bio-based acetate. Some outerwear pieces are made from new nylon that has been developed from renewable resources such as castor oil and a polyester yarn made from recycled plastic bottles.

“At the half-way point of our responsibility strategy to 2022, we remain dedicated to delivering tangible progress against our social and environmental targets, and our holistic, product-focused sustainability programmes are central to this,” said Pam Batty, Burberry’s vice president of corporate responsibility.

In addition, the team at Burberry are rolling out a new initiative in which pistachio-coloured labels will inform the customer how a product meets a range of environmental and social credentials.

“By inviting customers to learn more about the sustainable credentials of our products through our labelling programme, we are helping them to better understand our initiatives and the breadth of the ambition of our responsibility agenda. We strongly believe that driving positive change through all of our products at every stage of the value chain is crucial to building a more sustainable future for our whole industry,” she added.

For the accompanying campaign, models Tara Halliwell and Reece Nelson pose in the brand-new pieces against a minimalist backdrop.

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Carolina Herrera unveils debut make-up collection

Carolina Herrera has introduced its very first collection of make-up.The luxury fashion brand, launched by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980, is gearing up to make a splash in the cosmetics market with Carolina Herrera Makeup.Developed by beauty …

Carolina Herrera has introduced its very first collection of make-up.

The luxury fashion brand, launched by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980, is gearing up to make a splash in the cosmetics market with Carolina Herrera Makeup.

Developed by beauty creative director Carolina A. Herrera in collaboration with head designer Wes Gordon and make-up consultant Lauren Parsons, the high-end line is comprised of lipsticks and powders, all of which come packaged in jewellery-inspired cases.

“Traditionally, make-up is something that you keep out of sight whether on your bathroom shelf or in your vanity pouch,” said Herrera, who is one of the fashion star’s daughters. “But this is an entirely new and disruptive way of approaching beauty. We wanted to give women an opportunity to flaunt their makeup, unapologetically, like a piece of fabulous jewellery.”

The lipstick line includes 38 shades in matte, satin, and sheer finishes. In addition to bright pinks, berries, corals, nudes and browns, there is the Carolina Red, a tribute to the brand founder’s signature colour.

“Bold, joyful and exuberant, red has come to symbolise everything that the Carolina Herrera universe stands for. And who better to name our truest shade of red lipstick after than Mrs. Herrera herself? Designed to be consumed without moderation, Carolina Red is your remedy to monochrome fatigue, an invitation to take a walk on the wild side,” Herrera insisted.

With regards to powders, the collection includes eight shades of enhancing and setting powders, one highlighter, and one mattifier.

“We really wanted to ensure that the finishes of each lipstick formula was pigment-rich, long-wearing and hydrating, and that the powders were as finely milled and luminous as possible to avoid any sensation of cakiness,” added Parsons.

Carolina Herrera Makeup is currently available to purchase from the Harrods department store in the U.K.

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Hugo Boss welcomes British comedian to the ‘family’ following name change

A Hugo Boss representative has responded to comedian Joe Lycett’s decision to change his name as means of protesting the company’s treatment of small businesses.Lawyers for the German fashion label, which is often stylised as Boss, have sent cease-and-…

A Hugo Boss representative has responded to comedian Joe Lycett’s decision to change his name as means of protesting the company’s treatment of small businesses.

Lawyers for the German fashion label, which is often stylised as Boss, have sent cease-and-desist letters to numerous organisations which use “boss”, or similar, in their names. Accordingly, Joe has claimed the move has cost the companies, “thousands in legal fees and rebranding”.

Fighting back against the efforts, the British funnyman legally changed his name to Hugo Boss via deed poll earlier this week.

But in response, a spokesperson for the brand insisted: “We welcome the comedian formerly known as Joe Lycett as a member of the Hugo Boss family.”

They also clarified their position when it comes to trademarks.

“As he will know, as a ‘well-known’ trademark (as opposed to a ‘regular’ trademark) Hugo Boss enjoys increased protection not only against trademarks for similar goods, but also for dissimilar goods across all product categories for our brands and trademarks BOSS and BOSS Black and their associated visual appearance,” the representative added.

Explaining their dispute with brewery company Boss Brewing from Swansea in Wales, they explained executives of the company “approached them to prevent potential misunderstanding regarding the brands BOSS and BOSS Black, which were being used to market beer and items of clothing.”

“Both parties worked constructively to find a solution, which allows Boss Brewing the continued use of its name and all of its products, other than two beers (BOSS BLACK and BOSS BOSS) where a slight change of the name was agreed upon,” the statement continued. “As an open-minded company we would like to clarify that we do not oppose the free use of language in any way and we accept the generic term ‘boss’ and its various and frequent uses in different languages.”

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Dries Van Noten serves up ultimate party girl wardrobe for fall 20 line

Dries Van Noten has offered up a wardrobe for the ultimate party girl with his latest collection.The Belgian fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of Paris Fashion Week on Wednesday, with the 65-piece range including sequinned sep…

Dries Van Noten has offered up a wardrobe for the ultimate party girl with his latest collection.

The Belgian fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of Paris Fashion Week on Wednesday, with the 65-piece range including sequinned separates and silk dresses with bold floral motifs.

Speaking backstage, Van Noten explained that he was intrigued by the concept of “nocturnal glamour”.

“It’s about going out, enjoying life-having fun, that’s very important!” he commented, according to Vogue. “I thought of this party girl. Something mysterious. Something dark. But I questioned how far it could go, while staying contemporary.”

Opening the show, a model stepped out in a feathered skirt, long brown cardigan, plaid jacket, and knee-high brown suede boots. The designer then introduced a fun jungle-inspired print consisting of bright green leaves and pink flowers on velvet jumpsuits, silk kimonos, high-neck tops, and PVC trench coats.

Elsewhere, party-ready essentials included the likes of black leather trousers, long lime green sequin dresses, crushed purple velvet pants, ’70s-inspired snake print dresses and coats, fringed skirts, and metallic jacquard dresses with ’80-style puff sleeves.

The vibe was emphasised by the eye-catching hairstyles, with the models sporting neon paint, perhaps influenced by Billie Eilish’s signature look, on their roots.

To conclude, Van Noten served up a parade of eveningwear pieces, with highlights including a purple sequin bolero jacket, bright purple sequin dress with pockets, shiny black tuxedo jackets, and a long black gown with feather detailing on the hemline.

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Christian Siriano inspired by Birds of Prey for fall 20 collection

Christian Siriano was inspired by comic book film Birds of Prey while designing his latest collection.The fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of New York Fashion Week on Thursday night, with the presentation drawing in the likes…

Christian Siriano was inspired by comic book film Birds of Prey while designing his latest collection.

The fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of New York Fashion Week on Thursday night, with the presentation drawing in the likes of Heidi Klum, Leslie Jones, Alexa Chung, Rachel Bilson, Alicia Silverstone, and Angela Sarafyan.

Regarding his influences, Siriano shared in his show notes that he was fascinated by the attitude of Margot Robbie’s character Harley Quinn in the recently released DC Comics movie Birds of Prey, as well as the costumes and overall colour palette.

“This season, I let my imagination run wild. I was first inspired by the film Birds of Prey where I took ideas of Harley Quinn running through a dark abandoned carnival fun house,” he explained. “This led to a mythical, gothic and artistic experimental collection. I even found myself looking into the Dadaism art movement of the early 20th century for ideas of sculpture, form, futurism and expression.”

To open the show, Siriano had a model walk the runway in a gunmetal grey jacket, striped black and gold trousers, and a leather choker with silver chain details. Alluding to Harley Quinn’s signature make-up, a black heart motif was drawn under her eye.

A parade of black dresses with silver embellishment followed, with some looks accessorised with dangly earrings and wide-brimmed hats.

At one point, the 34-year-old fashion star introduced pops of fuchsia and lime in the form of metallic dresses and two-piece suits, while he waited for the end of the spectacle to introduce a range of ballgowns with touches of ’80s flair, including a striking dress made from dark orange silk.

At the conclusion, Siriano offered up a line of red carpet-ready ensembles, including a gown made from pink and black tulle, with model Coco Rocha sporting a dramatic metallic gown with architectural shoulders and flared hemline to close.

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