Carolina Herrera unveils debut make-up collection

Carolina Herrera has introduced its very first collection of make-up.The luxury fashion brand, launched by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980, is gearing up to make a splash in the cosmetics market with Carolina Herrera Makeup.Developed by beauty …

Carolina Herrera has introduced its very first collection of make-up.

The luxury fashion brand, launched by Venezuela-born designer Herrera in 1980, is gearing up to make a splash in the cosmetics market with Carolina Herrera Makeup.

Developed by beauty creative director Carolina A. Herrera in collaboration with head designer Wes Gordon and make-up consultant Lauren Parsons, the high-end line is comprised of lipsticks and powders, all of which come packaged in jewellery-inspired cases.

“Traditionally, make-up is something that you keep out of sight whether on your bathroom shelf or in your vanity pouch,” said Herrera, who is one of the fashion star’s daughters. “But this is an entirely new and disruptive way of approaching beauty. We wanted to give women an opportunity to flaunt their makeup, unapologetically, like a piece of fabulous jewellery.”

The lipstick line includes 38 shades in matte, satin, and sheer finishes. In addition to bright pinks, berries, corals, nudes and browns, there is the Carolina Red, a tribute to the brand founder’s signature colour.

“Bold, joyful and exuberant, red has come to symbolise everything that the Carolina Herrera universe stands for. And who better to name our truest shade of red lipstick after than Mrs. Herrera herself? Designed to be consumed without moderation, Carolina Red is your remedy to monochrome fatigue, an invitation to take a walk on the wild side,” Herrera insisted.

With regards to powders, the collection includes eight shades of enhancing and setting powders, one highlighter, and one mattifier.

“We really wanted to ensure that the finishes of each lipstick formula was pigment-rich, long-wearing and hydrating, and that the powders were as finely milled and luminous as possible to avoid any sensation of cakiness,” added Parsons.

Carolina Herrera Makeup is currently available to purchase from the Harrods department store in the U.K.

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Hugo Boss welcomes British comedian to the ‘family’ following name change

A Hugo Boss representative has responded to comedian Joe Lycett’s decision to change his name as means of protesting the company’s treatment of small businesses.Lawyers for the German fashion label, which is often stylised as Boss, have sent cease-and-…

A Hugo Boss representative has responded to comedian Joe Lycett’s decision to change his name as means of protesting the company’s treatment of small businesses.

Lawyers for the German fashion label, which is often stylised as Boss, have sent cease-and-desist letters to numerous organisations which use “boss”, or similar, in their names. Accordingly, Joe has claimed the move has cost the companies, “thousands in legal fees and rebranding”.

Fighting back against the efforts, the British funnyman legally changed his name to Hugo Boss via deed poll earlier this week.

But in response, a spokesperson for the brand insisted: “We welcome the comedian formerly known as Joe Lycett as a member of the Hugo Boss family.”

They also clarified their position when it comes to trademarks.

“As he will know, as a ‘well-known’ trademark (as opposed to a ‘regular’ trademark) Hugo Boss enjoys increased protection not only against trademarks for similar goods, but also for dissimilar goods across all product categories for our brands and trademarks BOSS and BOSS Black and their associated visual appearance,” the representative added.

Explaining their dispute with brewery company Boss Brewing from Swansea in Wales, they explained executives of the company “approached them to prevent potential misunderstanding regarding the brands BOSS and BOSS Black, which were being used to market beer and items of clothing.”

“Both parties worked constructively to find a solution, which allows Boss Brewing the continued use of its name and all of its products, other than two beers (BOSS BLACK and BOSS BOSS) where a slight change of the name was agreed upon,” the statement continued. “As an open-minded company we would like to clarify that we do not oppose the free use of language in any way and we accept the generic term ‘boss’ and its various and frequent uses in different languages.”

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Dries Van Noten serves up ultimate party girl wardrobe for fall 20 line

Dries Van Noten has offered up a wardrobe for the ultimate party girl with his latest collection.The Belgian fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of Paris Fashion Week on Wednesday, with the 65-piece range including sequinned sep…

Dries Van Noten has offered up a wardrobe for the ultimate party girl with his latest collection.

The Belgian fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of Paris Fashion Week on Wednesday, with the 65-piece range including sequinned separates and silk dresses with bold floral motifs.

Speaking backstage, Van Noten explained that he was intrigued by the concept of “nocturnal glamour”.

“It’s about going out, enjoying life-having fun, that’s very important!” he commented, according to Vogue. “I thought of this party girl. Something mysterious. Something dark. But I questioned how far it could go, while staying contemporary.”

Opening the show, a model stepped out in a feathered skirt, long brown cardigan, plaid jacket, and knee-high brown suede boots. The designer then introduced a fun jungle-inspired print consisting of bright green leaves and pink flowers on velvet jumpsuits, silk kimonos, high-neck tops, and PVC trench coats.

Elsewhere, party-ready essentials included the likes of black leather trousers, long lime green sequin dresses, crushed purple velvet pants, ’70s-inspired snake print dresses and coats, fringed skirts, and metallic jacquard dresses with ’80-style puff sleeves.

The vibe was emphasised by the eye-catching hairstyles, with the models sporting neon paint, perhaps influenced by Billie Eilish’s signature look, on their roots.

To conclude, Van Noten served up a parade of eveningwear pieces, with highlights including a purple sequin bolero jacket, bright purple sequin dress with pockets, shiny black tuxedo jackets, and a long black gown with feather detailing on the hemline.

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Christian Siriano inspired by Birds of Prey for fall 20 collection

Christian Siriano was inspired by comic book film Birds of Prey while designing his latest collection.The fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of New York Fashion Week on Thursday night, with the presentation drawing in the likes…

Christian Siriano was inspired by comic book film Birds of Prey while designing his latest collection.

The fashion designer unveiled his fall/winter 2020 line as part of New York Fashion Week on Thursday night, with the presentation drawing in the likes of Heidi Klum, Leslie Jones, Alexa Chung, Rachel Bilson, Alicia Silverstone, and Angela Sarafyan.

Regarding his influences, Siriano shared in his show notes that he was fascinated by the attitude of Margot Robbie’s character Harley Quinn in the recently released DC Comics movie Birds of Prey, as well as the costumes and overall colour palette.

“This season, I let my imagination run wild. I was first inspired by the film Birds of Prey where I took ideas of Harley Quinn running through a dark abandoned carnival fun house,” he explained. “This led to a mythical, gothic and artistic experimental collection. I even found myself looking into the Dadaism art movement of the early 20th century for ideas of sculpture, form, futurism and expression.”

To open the show, Siriano had a model walk the runway in a gunmetal grey jacket, striped black and gold trousers, and a leather choker with silver chain details. Alluding to Harley Quinn’s signature make-up, a black heart motif was drawn under her eye.

A parade of black dresses with silver embellishment followed, with some looks accessorised with dangly earrings and wide-brimmed hats.

At one point, the 34-year-old fashion star introduced pops of fuchsia and lime in the form of metallic dresses and two-piece suits, while he waited for the end of the spectacle to introduce a range of ballgowns with touches of ’80s flair, including a striking dress made from dark orange silk.

At the conclusion, Siriano offered up a line of red carpet-ready ensembles, including a gown made from pink and black tulle, with model Coco Rocha sporting a dramatic metallic gown with architectural shoulders and flared hemline to close.

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Elle Macpherson didn’t ‘recognise’ her body when she turned 50

Elle Macpherson no longer “recognised” her body when she hit the milestone age of 50.The Australian supermodel continues to be one of the most sought-after names in the business, having landed gigs with the likes of Ralph Lauren and Victoria’s Secret. …

Elle Macpherson no longer “recognised” her body when she hit the milestone age of 50.

The Australian supermodel continues to be one of the most sought-after names in the business, having landed gigs with the likes of Ralph Lauren and Victoria’s Secret.

But in a new interview, Elle opened up about the changes to her health and wellbeing that occurred around her 50th birthday.

“I’ve always been interested in wellness and trying to better understand my body through different phases of my life,” she told bodyandsoul.com.au. “I wasn’t feeling like myself and I didn’t recognise my body.”

Eventually, Elle decided to consult with naturopathic nutritionist Dr. Simone Laubscher, with the health expert switching up her diet.

And the blonde beauty was so thrilled with the results she set about creating her own wellness company WelleCo, which offers dietary supplements and plant-based protein powders.

“WelleCo was a combination of my own personal wellness journey and vision, and that became the foundation of the business,” the 55-year-old shared. “It wasn’t like I made a calculated decision to be in the wellness business, or to move into it because it made good business sense. It just happened to coincide – the right place, right time.”

Despite Elle’s previous business ventures, including lingerie and beauty collaborations, she insisted founding WelleCo was a risk.

“People are scared to try things because they’re afraid of making mistakes, but I think you can’t learn unless you experience things,” she smiled.

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Stella McCartney launching biodegradable denim collection

Stella McCartney is gearing up to launch a collection of biodegradable denim.The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the fashion industry and creates all of her pieces using eco-friendly and cruelty-free materials…

Stella McCartney is gearing up to launch a collection of biodegradable denim.

The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the fashion industry and creates all of her pieces using eco-friendly and cruelty-free materials.

Now, McCartney has announced that she has partnered with bosses at Italian manufacturer Candiani to create a range of biodegradable, stretch denim using plant-based yarns for her autumn 2020 line.

The collection features 10 pieces in two styles made with Candiani’s patented COREVA Stretch Technology, which is created using organic cotton wrapped around a natural rubber core. The resulting fabric is free from plastics and micro-plastic.

“In a world where resources are diminishing and landfills are overflowing with discarded garments, it’s our duty to look for renewable resources, in addition to biodegradable and compostable materials,” said Alberto Candiani, owner of the Candiani family mill. “Denim has to take the lead as the indigo flag of this revolution, and we are thrilled to be working alongside Stella McCartney to share our innovation and beliefs with the wider fashion industry.”

In addition, the new denim fabric will be dyed with a biodegradable ingredient derived from mushrooms and seaweed called Kitotex Vegetal, and Indigo Juice, which keeps the indigo superficial on the yarn.

“Both of these technologies reduce the consumption of water, energy, and chemicals used in the dyeing and laundry processes,” a representative for the brand added.

McCartney’s autumn 2020 collection will drop in May.

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Footwear brand TOMS shifting away from One for One model

Executives at footwear brand TOMS are shifting away from their One for One model.Founded by entrepreneur Blake Mycoskie in 2006, the company is known for pioneering the “one for all concept” business model, with bosses promising to deliver a pair of fr…

Executives at footwear brand TOMS are shifting away from their One for One model.

Founded by entrepreneur Blake Mycoskie in 2006, the company is known for pioneering the “one for all concept” business model, with bosses promising to deliver a pair of free shoes to a child in need for every sale of their retail product. Over the years, product lines have been expanded to include eyewear, apparel, handbags, and coffee, but in the brand’s Impact Report published on Wednesday, Amy Smith, chief giving officer, announced that TOMS’ giving strategy would soon be “evolving”.

“We made the decision to decouple our impact from the One for One model we pioneered, and to expand our giving portfolio to include impact grants. This way, we can support organisations working to address some of today’s most pressing issues,” she said. “As you can imagine, we didn’t make this decision lightly. But, we’re motivated by the opportunity to have meaningful impact in some new areas – areas that are important to us, and to you. Truth be told, we haven’t quite figured everything out yet, but we do know that directing our shoe giving and grants towards the promotion of physical safety, mental health, and equality of opportunity is the right next step for TOMS.”

Smith went on to explain that going forward, the company will give both shoes and impact grants to local partners around the world who are working to create positive change. She also noted that executives are committed to dedicating at least one-third of annual net profits to a giving fund managed by an internal team.

Since launching, TOMS has given over 95 million pairs of shoes to children in need around the world.

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Knitwear brand Pringle of Scotland collaborates with H&M

Designers at Pringle of Scotland have collaborated with H&M on a capsule collection.The Scottish heritage label is known for its cashmere knitwear and holds the royal warrant as manufacturers of knitted garments. Now, design teams from both labels have…

Designers at Pringle of Scotland have collaborated with H&M on a capsule collection.

The Scottish heritage label is known for its cashmere knitwear and holds the royal warrant as manufacturers of knitted garments.

Now, design teams from both labels have partnered on a limited-edition line, which will be available to buy in stores around the world and online from 3 October.

“Pringle of Scotland has a long history of collaboration, and this latest partnership with H&M has been hugely inspiring,” said Katy Wallace, brand director at Pringle of Scotland. “We are always looking for new ways to express the DNA of our heritage knitwear and we hope this latest playful, sporty take on our famous argyle and fair isle knitwear will delight our existing customers, as well as reach a worldwide audience via H&M.”

Taking inspiration from Pringle of Scotland’s famous highland argyles and jacquards, key pieces in the line include diamond pattern knitted sweaters, funnel-necked jumpers, and wide-legged grey trousers.

Other items refer to the athleisure trend, such as hoodies, leggings, sweater dresses with ring-pull zip closures, and slouchy hats, with the palette focusing on a mix of mustard, dove grey, and biscuit brown, alongside flashes of acid yellow.

Accordingly, Maria Ostblom, Head of Design Womenswear at H&M, said she was thrilled with the final result.

“The collaboration with Pringle of Scotland, a brand with such a rich and impressive history, has been so much fun for the H&M design team,” the designer praised. “We have re-worked the iconic argyles and jacquards to incorporate a youthful and sporty touch and I’m proud that we have managed to employ a range of recycled polyesters, wools and organic cottons. I look forward to seeing our customers style the pieces in their own way.”

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Kendall Jenner shows off dance moves in Stuart Weitzman campaign

Kendall Jenner dances up a storm in Stuart Weitzman’s latest campaign.The model, who also appeared in the footwear label’s marketing imagery for the Nudist collection earlier this year, is now fronting the fall 2019 advertising campaign. In the first …

Kendall Jenner dances up a storm in Stuart Weitzman’s latest campaign.

The model, who also appeared in the footwear label’s marketing imagery for the Nudist collection earlier this year, is now fronting the fall 2019 advertising campaign.

In the first instalment of the campaign, titled Boot Camp, Kendall is seen dancing in a black bodysuit and a pair of the popular Lesley boots, with the video also featuring dancers Stasya Generalova and Morgan Wright.

In the accompanying still images, the 23-year-old demonstrates her flexibility in a series of abstract poses.

“#SWDANCE, the first scene of SW Boot Camp, highlights the art of movement,” a brand representative stated of the inspiration behind the campaign. “It portrays the power and confidence women feel when they can effortlessly move and dance through their days with fluidity and ease in their SW boots.”

The Lesley boots are available in 17 sizes and three widths. It is crafted from stretch suede and features a tie back detail, which can be adjusted for a flawless fit around the thigh.

In all, the new Stuart Weitzman campaign is comprised of three short films and imagery produced by photographer and videographer Charlotte Wales and stylist Clare Richardson.

“Set in the present day, during a time when women are constantly redefining their complex and ever-changing roles, the campaign redefines the traditional idea of boot camp entirely, turning it from extreme to exquisite, from excessive to elegant,” they added. “Because in today’s landscape, nothing is as straightforward as it seems.”

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Talita von Furstenberg doesn’t consider herself a royal

Talita von Furstenberg dislikes using her official title because she doesn’t consider herself a royal.The 20-year-old is the granddaughter of fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg and German nobleman Prince Egon von Furstenberg but doesn’t want people…

Talita von Furstenberg dislikes using her official title because she doesn’t consider herself a royal.

The 20-year-old is the granddaughter of fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg and German nobleman Prince Egon von Furstenberg but doesn’t want people to call her princess, and she avoids using the moniker entirely.

“I definitely would not consider myself a royal. It’s by blood, but it’s so far off, I don’t like to use my title,” she told Vogue.com.

Talita recently launched her debut collection for the Diane von Furstenberg label, TVF for DVF, which was inspired by her childhood holidays in The Bahamas.

“Harbour Island in The Bahamas is like my second home – I’ve been going since I was a baby, so every time I return it’s a big reunion with family and friends. The Dunmore Hotel is the cutest spot for lunch,” she shared.

The designer is also juggling her budding fashion career with her studies at Georgetown University in Washington D.C., where she is majoring in justice and peace studies. And as production on her second TVF for DVF collection begins in October, Talita is finding it harder to balance her responsibilities as her workload drastically increases.

“But it’s worth it,” she insisted. “I get to pursue my two main interests: fashion and social justice.”

Elsewhere in the interview, Talita shared her must-have beauty essentials, including a $12 (£10) miracle balm.

“Glossier’s Balm Dotcom in Coconut is really good. I never leave the house without lip balm,” she gushed. “I use Ouai hair products and everyone keeps complimenting me on the scent. Now, the brand has launched perfumes, too.”

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