Edward Norton denies he cost Janeane Garofalo a role in Fight Club

Edward Norton has denied Janeane Garofalo’s claims that he was to blame for her losing out on a role in David Fincher’s hit movie Fight Club.During a recent interview with Yahoo’s Build Series, Garofalo revealed that she’d been up for the role of Marla…

Edward Norton has denied Janeane Garofalo’s claims that he was to blame for her losing out on a role in David Fincher’s hit movie Fight Club.

During a recent interview with Yahoo’s Build Series, Garofalo revealed that she’d been up for the role of Marla Singer in the 1999 film and had been offered the part by Fincher, but the film’s star wanted his then-girlfriend Courtney Love to play the character instead.

“I was like, ‘Can I audition with him or for him?'” the actress said. “And I was told that he would like Courtney Love to do it, because he was dating her, but (his co-star) Brad Pitt said, ‘I’m not going to sign off on that.’ So, they agreed on Helena Bonham Carter, who was probably much better than I would have been…(But) I met with David Fincher, who handed me the script and said, ‘If you like it, the part is yours.'”

Following her allegations, Norton issued a statement to CNN in which he insisted he had no influence over Fincher’s casting decisions.

“I’m sorry Janeane is under that impression, but if she was serious, she’s really mistaken,” he said. “David Fincher does exactly what he wants. He makes the call on every dimension of his films, top to bottom. I don’t recall him ever even raising the subject of who he was considering for most other roles. The one suggestion I made, he shot down. I was a big fan of Janeane’s so I’d have loved to do a reading with her.”

Elsewhere in the Build Series interview, Garofalo said Pitt apologised to her for “what happened” with Fight Club, and claimed that Norton “pretends he doesn’t know who I am” when she spots him in their New York neighbourhood.

In response, the actor concluded his statement with, “And if she sees me in the neighbourhood I hope she’d come say hi.”

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Edward Norton didn’t want to ruin friendship with Thom Yorke over Motherless Brooklyn score

Edward Norton dropped plans to get Thom Yorke to score his new movie Motherless Brooklyn as he feared it would wreck their friendship.The Fight Club actor originally wanted the Radiohead frontman to pen around 75 minutes of jazz music for the period dr…

Edward Norton dropped plans to get Thom Yorke to score his new movie Motherless Brooklyn as he feared it would wreck their friendship.

The Fight Club actor originally wanted the Radiohead frontman to pen around 75 minutes of jazz music for the period drama, which he directs and stars in, but instead turned to Wynton Marsalis, a legend of the genre, to write most of the film’s music, with Yorke contributing one track, Daily Battles.

Speaking to The Guardian, the actor revealed that they decided not to work together as the musician felt a little upset with the use of his score in Luca Guadagnino’s 2018 horror Suspiria and he didn’t want a similar situation to ruin their friendship.

“Not to say that we don’t love Luca,” Norton said. “But Thom came off Suspiria feeling so burned.”

Explaining their decision to limit their collaboration to one song, he added: “The last thing you want with somebody you know is to get into a bloody situation. That’s the nightmare of all nightmares.”

Before turning to Marsalis, Norton considered Yorke’s Radiohead bandmate Jonny Greenwood but he learned from the guitarist and composer’s longtime collaborator Paul Thomas Anderson that Greenwood’s working style would not have gelled well with his.

“(Anderson) said: ‘If you expect any iterative back-and-forth flow with Jonny, this is a mirage. He just sends me what he’s got and says: ‘Good luck to you’…And, well, no. That wouldn’t work for me,” the 50-year-old recalled.

Norton and Yorke nearly worked together on the same movie two decades ago – as the No Surprises hitmaker was offered the chance to score Fight Club. However, he turned the opportunity, with the musician explaining, “Got the email. Got the script. And I was just too f**ked up in the head to do it.”

Motherless Brooklyn debuted in cinemas earlier this month.

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Brad Pitt chooses roles only he can do 

Brad Pitt chooses parts depending on whether he can bring his own “personal experience” to them.The Fight Club actor has been more selective with his acting roles in recent years, having only starred in 2016’s Allied and 2017’s War Machine before makin…

Brad Pitt chooses parts depending on whether he can bring his own “personal experience” to them.

The Fight Club actor has been more selective with his acting roles in recent years, having only starred in 2016’s Allied and 2017’s War Machine before making a splash this year with major lead roles in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and James Gray’s sci-fi flick Ad Astra.

Explaining how he picks and chooses his parts, Pitt told GQ magazine that he always asks himself: “If I’m gonna do the role, what can I bring to it that someone else can’t?”

“It’s about bringing my personal experience, my personal humour, my personal, um, embarrassments, and my personal pains,” he continued. “When I watch (Christian) Bale or (Tom) Hardy, I can’t do what they do. I love watching them. And I couldn’t step into that role… I want to do the same thing on my end.”

The 55-year-old also admitted that ageing has made him conscious of spending his time wisely and working on projects or with people he cares about.

“It’s just getting f**king older!” the star continued. “How you become more aware of time, and you’ve had more experience, good and bad, with people. And your own wins and losses – the older you get, they don’t seem like so much of a win or so much of a loss. Who you spend your time with, how you spend time – it has just become much more important to me.”

However, most of the time, Pitt will simply turn projects down so he can enjoy a healthy work-life balance.

“Leo(nardo DiCaprio) and I were having this conversation the other day. I hit this point in the late ’90s or early 2000s, where I realised I was chasing these interesting (roles), yet I was failing to live as interesting a life as I thought I could,” he added.

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Harrison Ford’s Han Solo jacket set to sell for over $1 million at props auction

A jacket worn by Harrison Ford as Han Solo in Star Wars is estimated to sell for over $1 million (£762,000) at an upcoming auction.The navy jacket featuring four front pockets that Ford donned in 1980 cinema classic The Empire Strikes Back is part of …

A jacket worn by Harrison Ford as Han Solo in Star Wars is estimated to sell for over $1 million (£762,000) at an upcoming auction.

The navy jacket featuring four front pockets that Ford donned in 1980 cinema classic The Empire Strikes Back is part of 600 lots being sold off by Prop Store during a live auction on 20 September (18) at London’s BFI IMAX cinema.

The fedora hat worn by Ford’s other famous alter ego, Indiana Jones, in Raiders of the Lost Ark is also going under the hammer, with experts estimating it will fetch up to $397,000 (£300,000), while adventurer Indy’s bullwhip from The Temple of Doom is poised to fetch up to $92,000 (£70,000).

There will also be lots of other Star Wars props on offer for fans of the sci-fi franchise, including a Stormtrooper helmet from the first Star Wars film as well as a similar helmet from 2017’s The Last Jedi.

And judging by a recent auction held in Las Vegas, appetite for original Star Wars props is high, with a blaster used by Han Solo in Return of the Jedi fetching $550,000 (£419,000).

Among the other lots at the upcoming Prop Store sale is the costume worn by Johnny Depp in the 1990 film Edward Scissorhands, the robe worn by Brad Pitt as Tyler Durden in Fight Club, the Jumanji game board from the 1995 film, Marty McFly’s (Michael J. Fox) hoverboard from Back to the Future Part II, Forrest Gump’s (Tom Hanks) Bubba Gump Shrimp hat and a Wonka Bar from Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory.

And for movie fans whose pockets aren’t that deep, all items will be on display for the public to view from 6 September.

“Our auction on September 20 2018 will once again raise the bar, presenting some of the most iconic cinematic artefacts of our time,” Stephen Lane, chief executive of Prop Store, said in a statement.

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