Theory shake things up with new emotional focus

Theory is changing its focus by engaging in a more emotional relationship with its customers.The New York-based fashion label was created in 1997, and according to founder Andrew Rosen, the aim was to design versatile pieces to reflect the new, technol…

Theory is changing its focus by engaging in a more emotional relationship with its customers.

The New York-based fashion label was created in 1997, and according to founder Andrew Rosen, the aim was to design versatile pieces to reflect the new, technologically driven lifestyles in modern women.

However, in an interview with WWD, Rosen admitted that for too long the brand had focused on its own image rather than the need of the customer, but said things are set to change.

“I want to be always modernising what we’re doing. Staying and leading the customer and staying ahead of the customer and bringing in things she needs and wants,” he explained. “We don’t need to have a revolution, just a constant evolution. And you know, I feel that we needed fresh energy in the company design-wise, creatively.”

The company’s new outlook could be in part to do with the shake-up within its current team, as the pre-spring 2019 collection will be the first under new womenswear creative director Francesco Fucci, who was previously head designer at The Row for a five year tenure.

“(I) sought to return to the roots of the brand and create a new glossary of garments that could contribute to the evolution of what the Theory woman stands for today,” Fucci explained to British Vogue.

A photo taken from his anticipated debut collection shows a reinvention of Theory’s signature shirt, jacket and trouser combination, an echo of the brand’s original aesthetic when it was founded twenty years ago.

And though a degree of revitalisation is on the cards, Fucci insists that he won’t be engaging in anything too radical.

“I’m not a revolution person,” he smiled. “I come from a craftsmanship culture. My uncles were menswear tailors.”

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