Dr. Dre’s wife files for divorce

Rap icon Dr. Dre and his wife are ending their 24 year marriage.Nicole Young has filed for divorce, citing irreconcilable differences as the reason for the split. The couple wed in May, 1996, and share two adult kids. This was lawyer Nicole’s second …

Rap icon Dr. Dre and his wife are ending their 24 year marriage.

Nicole Young has filed for divorce, citing irreconcilable differences as the reason for the split.

The couple wed in May, 1996, and share two adult kids.

This was lawyer Nicole’s second marriage – her first husband was to former basketball player Sedale Threatt.

Dr. Dre’s representatives have yet to comment on the divorce news.

The rapper and entrepreneur, who initially found fame in one of hip-hop’s most trailblazing bands, N.W.A. As well as his rap career, Dre has also become one of music’s most successful businessmen, starting Beats Electronics and previously co-owning Death Row Records

He recently spoke out about the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis after a white cop knelt on his neck during an arrest.

“It felt like that cop had his knee on all of our necks, meaning black men,” Dre told Lil Wayne on the rapper’s Young Money Radio show. “And yeah, it’s extremely painful; it’s extremely painful because it keeps going on. It continues to go on and it’s like, ‘What can we do, or what do we need to do to make this thing stop? What is supposed to happen to make this thing stop? It has to stop…’

“Something is going to happen now, to at least put us in the area where we can start talking about a way to make this thing stop. I’m seeing white people out there protesting as well, which is a good thing.”

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Laura Dern turning to transcendental meditation to ease lockdown worries

Laura Dern is turning to transcendental meditation to ease her stress and anxiety during lockdown.The Oscar-winning actress has long been a fan of the mindfulness practice, and said that it has been helping her to relax amid the uncertainty of the ongo…

Laura Dern is turning to transcendental meditation to ease her stress and anxiety during lockdown.

The Oscar-winning actress has long been a fan of the mindfulness practice, and said that it has been helping her to relax amid the uncertainty of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

“When I’ve been consistent, meditation has been a wonderful part of my life’s practice,” Dern told Mind Body Green. “Exercise has come in different forms – be it yoga or more physical training for a film.”

“I think I’ve dug deeper with myself and (my kids) to really look at what works for each of us individually and what changes not only our health and our stamina but also our mood,” she added.

She’s now enjoying a renewed appreciation for the outdoors, and has been encouraging her children – son Ellery and daughter Jaya – to take long walks with her on a daily basis.

“For those of us in urban environments in which there have been larger spikes and numbers in terms of Covid-19, taking the time to find nature is a privilege,” Dern explained. “Now I don’t have to beg my kids to walk the dog, because they need it as much as the dog does – to get some fresh air and feel the sun. We’re lucky to go to a hiking trail or a park now that they’ve reopened – it really makes a difference.”

And the Big Little Lies star acknowledged the ongoing protests over racial inequality in the U.S., following the death of George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer, have affected her perception of self-care.

“Marching in the street, making it matter, and not stopping until everyone is treated justly and with respect is self-care,” the 53-year-old stated.

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Conde Nast pledges to improve diversity after intense criticism

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling…

Conde Nast boss Roger Lynch has pledged to improve diversity after facing intense criticism.

The global chief executive officer assured advertisers during a recent NewsFronts pitch that staff at the media giant, whose titles include Vogue, are “doubling down” efforts to create “positive social change”.

“It shouldn’t take the horrendous murder of innocent people like George Floyd to make us wake up as a society, but now we need to listen, learn and take quick action to be a positive force as an industry,” Lynch said during the media presentation, according to WWD.

“I’m sure many of you have been watching how this passion for creating positive social change in the world led us to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a company, too. We’re doubling down on work we’ve already been doing to build a culture that prioritises diversity and inclusion,” he added.

His pledges included hiring a new global chief diversity and inclusion officer which will “help to ensure equitable representation within our content across print, digital and video,” and also vowed to hire more people of colour.

Lynch also promised to put together an external diversity council which would work alongside content teams.

Magazines owned by Conde Nast have come under fire since the Black Lives Matter movement urged change after the death of Floyd at the hands of white police officers last month.

U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief and Conde artistic director Anna Wintour has been targeted recently, following her admission that she allowed “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at the fashion bible.

And monthly American food publication Bon Appetit was called out after a photograph of former editor-in-chief Adam Rapoport emerged of him in brown face, and allegations of racially discriminatory behaviour.

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Pregnant Teyana Taylor meditating to ease anxiety and stress

Pregnant R&B star Teyana Taylor has turned to meditation to help relieve feelings of stress and anxiety. The Gonna Love Me singer, who is expecting her second child with her basketball star husband, Iman Shumpert, has been experiencing a rollercoaster…

Pregnant R&B star Teyana Taylor has turned to meditation to help relieve feelings of stress and anxiety.

The Gonna Love Me singer, who is expecting her second child with her basketball star husband, Iman Shumpert, has been experiencing a rollercoaster of emotions in recent weeks due to the death of George Floyd in May and the subsequent Black Lives Matter protests, and she has turned to meditation to help her calm down for the sake of her unborn child.

“Everything that was going on with our people and me being pregnant was very tough… because that enrage that we felt, that hurt that we felt, I felt that times 20, being a pregnant woman, and super emotional (sic),” she told New York radio show The Breakfast Club. “I’ve gotten very, very, very heavy into meditation, just resetting myself, centring myself, and just praying for my Black family…”

The 29-year-old has created “a whole meditation area” on her balcony and goes there whenever she needs to take some time out and calm down.

“It’s really calming, (I) light my sage, and we just pray…” she shared. “Everything that I go through, I have to still remember that I’m carrying a child and they feel everything, so if I’m stressing, my stomach will start getting hard; (if) I’m crying, my stomach will start hurting.”

Taylor revealed her pregnancy news in the music video for her recent single Wake Up Love, which hit the Internet on 12 June. The tot is due later this summer.

She and Shumpert, who wed in 2016, are already parents to four-year-old daughter Iman Tayla, nicknamed Junie.

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Beverly Johnson calls on Anna Wintour to address ‘structural exclusion’ at U.S. Vogue

Beverly Johnson has urged Anna Wintour to address a “culture of structural exclusion” at U.S. Vogue.Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minne…

Beverly Johnson has urged Anna Wintour to address a “culture of structural exclusion” at U.S. Vogue.

Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers in late May, Wintour issued a candid statement to her staff at the fashion magazine earlier this month in which she expressed her regret over not doing enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure.

But in a new op-ed published in The Washington Post on Wednesday, Johnson – who became the first African-American model to appear on the cover of U.S. Vogue back in 1974 – has insisted the editor-in-chief needs to do more to promote black talent at the publication as well as within her role as artistic director of publishing giant Conde Nast.

“Anna Wintour, who has been the editor in chief of Vogue for over 30 years and is currently the doyenne of Conde Nast, admitted last week to a culture of structural exclusion at Vogue and across the fashion industry. Wow – after three decades, fashion’s leading arbiter has finally acknowledged that there may be a problem!” she wrote. “Wintour is arguably the most powerful person in the world of fashion. Wintour’s power would ostensibly allow her to hold her peers in fashion accountable for making structural changes.”

Accordingly, Johnson went on to propose Wintour and her colleagues adopt the ‘Beverly Johnson Rule’ in which it will be required for executives to interview a diverse range of candidates for all positions within the firm.

“This rule would be especially relevant to boards of directors, C-suite executives, top editorial positions and other influential roles. I also invite chief executives of companies in the fashion, beauty and media industries to adopt this rule,” the 67-year-old stated.

To conclude her piece, Johnson insisted she will continue fighting against the racism and exclusion that have been “an ugly part of the beauty business for far too long”.

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Gone with the Wind returning to HBO Max with introduction of ‘historical context’

Gone with the Wind is to return to HBO Max with an introduction by African-American scholar Jacqueline Stewart.In light of the shocking death of George Floyd at the hands of police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota last month, and the subsequent Black…

Gone with the Wind is to return to HBO Max with an introduction by African-American scholar Jacqueline Stewart.

In light of the shocking death of George Floyd at the hands of police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota last month, and the subsequent Black Lives Matter demonstrations held in major cities around the world, executives at the streaming service decided to temporarily remove the Hollywood epic due to its depiction of “ethnic and racial prejudices”.

While HBO Max bosses have not yet announced when Gone with the Wind will be back in the line-up, Stewart, professor in the Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago, has confirmed she will be providing an introduction explaining its “historical contexts”.

“For me, this is an opportunity to think about what classic films can teach us,” she wrote in an op-ed for CNN. “Right now, people are turning to movies for racial re-education, and the top-selling books on Amazon are about anti-racism and racial inequality. If people are really doing their homework, we may be poised to have our most informed, honest and productive national conversations yet about Black lives on screen and off.”

Gone with the Wind is set in the American South and follows a couple, played by Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh, who embark on a turbulent romance during the Civil War and Reconstruction era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon its release in 1939 and remains the highest-grossing movie of all-time, when adjusted for inflation.

Stewart also insisted it is important for people to be able to view Gone with the Wind as part of their education.

“The film romanticises slavery as a benign and benevolent institution. Gone with the Wind continues to have a profound impact on the ways mainstream audiences visualise the antebellum South and the Reconstruction period that followed the Civil War,” she added.

Gone with the Wind won eight competitive Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress for Hattie McDaniel, who became the first African-American to ever win an Academy Award.

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Joan Smalls calls out fashion industry for lack of support for Black Lives Matter movement

Joan Smalls has called out the fashion industry for feeding “the beast of racism and inequality” and not doing enough to support the Black Lives Matter movement. Many people and brands have been pledging their support for the movement, which has been …

Joan Smalls has called out the fashion industry for feeding “the beast of racism and inequality” and not doing enough to support the Black Lives Matter movement.

Many people and brands have been pledging their support for the movement, which has been in the headlines since the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of police on 25 May, by issuing statements or posting black squares to mark their solidarity on social media.

On Thursday, the Puerto Rican model posted a video on Instagram in which she called out the fashion industry for jumping on the bandwagon and urged officials to take action to address the racism and inequality that she has experienced during her modelling career.

“You (the fashion industry) have continually let us down with your insensitivity and tone-deafness and damage control apologies of ‘we will do better,'” she stated. “You fall short trying to narrate our stories by toning us down or having them curated by people who haven’t lived or walked a day in our shoes. It’s now time to give us a real seat at the table, because we are worthy, because we are talented, because we are unique.

“What I do need is recognition of the systemic issues – the issues that arise from top to bottom within the industry, from photographers not wanting to shoot me because there’s no need to shoot a black girl to the magazines, brands, and agencies who continue to work with people of that mindset, to the stylists and casting directors not willing to treat us fairly and give us a chance, and the list goes on. Yet you, the industry, continue to employ them. You feed the beast. The beast of racism and inequality.”

She then called on fashion industry leaders to use the current opportunity to speak out and show that they care about working to eliminate those issues, with her adding, “Your silence is not only insulting, it is a part of the bigger problem within this industry. We see you, do you see us now?”

The 31-year-old concluded by announcing she would be donating 50 per cent of her income for the rest of 2020 to organisations that support the Black Lives Matter movement and called on brands to take similar action.

“I urge you to use your voice and your infrastructure to help us. I urge all of you to stand with us. Together we are stronger,” she said.

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Ava DuVernay elected to Academy’s board of governors

Ava DuVernay has been elected to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ board of governors.The Selma filmmaker is among six people who have landed a place on the board, which oversees the Oscars, for the first time, and she was nominated to h…

Ava DuVernay has been elected to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ board of governors.

The Selma filmmaker is among six people who have landed a place on the board, which oversees the Oscars, for the first time, and she was nominated to head the directors branch.

“Thank you to the members of the Directors Branch of @TheAcademy. Life is a funny, fascinating thing. You never know what’s around the corner,” Ava wrote in a post on Twitter.

The Oscar-nominated filmmaker has been speaking out about racial injustice and inequality following the death of George Floyd, and recently made her Netflix documentary 13th available to watch on YouTube in an effort to educate those on systemic racism in the U.S.

Also elected to the board of governors for the first time are casting director Debra Zane, producer Lynette Howell Taylor, editor Stephen Rivkin, make-up artist Linda Flowers, and Rob Bredow for visuals effects.

Whoopi Goldberg, who won an Oscar for her role in Ghost back in 1991, was among those re-elected to the board of governors and will serve another three-year term as a governor of the actors branch.

The election results mean the number of female board members has increased from 25 to 26 and people of colour from 11 to 12.

The Academy’s board is also expected to meet on Thursday, via video conference call, to discuss the possibility of postponing the 2021 Oscars in light of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

According to Deadline, it is expected that the current date of 28 February will be pushed into March or even April due to the industry-wide shutdown.

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Anok Yai responds to Carine Roitfeld’s ‘tone-deaf’ social media post

Anok Yai has responded to an insensitive social media post recently shared by Carine Roitfeld.In light of the shocking death of unarmed African-American man George Floyd at the hands of police officers on 25 May, the former Vogue Paris editor-in-chief …

Anok Yai has responded to an insensitive social media post recently shared by Carine Roitfeld.

In light of the shocking death of unarmed African-American man George Floyd at the hands of police officers on 25 May, the former Vogue Paris editor-in-chief took to Instagram to show her support for the Black Lives Matter movement by posting a picture of herself and black model Yai, and accompanied it with the words, “Anok is not a black woman, she is my friend, I missing (sic)!”

Roitfeld later apologised for the timing and wording of her post, and after reflecting on the controversy for several days, Yai has now spoken out on the topic.

“A lot of people have asked what my reaction was to an insensitive post from a friend of mine on Instagram last week,” she wrote in an op-ed for OprahMag.com. “Of course, it was jarring-and it was just one of many similar microaggressions I’ve experienced during my time in fashion. But the bigger point I’d like to focus on is that the fashion industry needs to become educated…and fast.”

Yai went on to share that she has experienced racism and microaggressions on various occasions backstage at shows, as well as witnessed the same happening to her friends. She was disappointed to see a lack of support when models stood up for themselves, and accordingly, is now calling for industry leaders to do better in educating themselves and promoting inclusivity and diversity.

“Black models should not have to teach working professionals how to deal with our hair and skin day in and day out. Educate yourself and come prepared. It’s your job. The world is changing right before our very eyes, and we won’t be tolerant of intolerance any longer,” the 22-year-old added.

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Anna Wintour admits to ‘hurtful and intolerant’ behaviour at U.S. Vogue

Anna Wintour has admitted to allowing “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at U.S. Vogue.Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota…

Anna Wintour has admitted to allowing “hurtful and intolerant” behaviour to occur at U.S. Vogue.

Amidst the Black Lives Matter protests taking place around the world in the wake of the death of African-American man George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota police officers on 25 May, the fashion magazine’s editor-in-chief has issued a candid statement to her staff in which she expressed her regret over not doing enough to promote diversity and inclusivity during her 32-year tenure.

“I want to say plainly that I know Vogue has not found enough ways to elevate and give space to Black editors, writers, photographers, designers and other creators. We have made mistakes too, publishing images or stories that have been hurtful or intolerant. I take full responsibility for those mistakes,” the note, obtained by the New York Post’s Page Six, reads. “It can’t be easy to be a Black employee at Vogue, and there are too few of you. I know that it is not enough to say we will do better, but we will – and please know that I value your voices and responses as we move forward.”

Wintour went on to insist she would be looking to educate her team on systemic racism and called on her employees to reach out to her personally with their input. She also indicated that bosses at Vogue’s publisher, Conde Nast, would be making financial donations in support of anti-racism groups.

“This is a historic and heartbreaking moment for our country and it should be a time of listening, reflection, and humility for those of us in positions of privilege and authority. It should also be a time of action and commitments. On a corporate level, work is being done to support organisations in a real way,” the 70-year-old added.

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