Nicole Richie took five years to embrace her natural curls

Nicole Richie has spent the past five years learning to embrace her naturally curly hair.In the past, the TV personality and fashion designer has been quite the chameleon when it comes to her locks, trying a variety of hairstyles and a range of bold sh…

Nicole Richie has spent the past five years learning to embrace her naturally curly hair.

In the past, the TV personality and fashion designer has been quite the chameleon when it comes to her locks, trying a variety of hairstyles and a range of bold shades, including lilac and platinum blonde.

However, in a new interview with Good Morning America, Nicole recalled how one day she woke up and decided it was time to give her strands a break.

“I had dyed my hair a bunch of colours, and it was great and so much fun, but then it all fell out. I had to cut all my hair off and then I had to really be serious about growing it out. So, I had to do absolutely nothing to it,” she told the outlet. “So, in the process, I had to let my hair go curly. But this moment was really important to me because I would say in the past five years, being forced to not doing anything to my hair, really forced me to take a look at how much I was not embracing my curls and how much of that side of myself I really didn’t like without knowing it.”

Nicole went on to urge other people to consider ditching bleach and heated styling tools too.

“That was a really big moment for me because I was, like, ‘Wait, I like my hair,'” the 37-year-old insisted. “You’ve got to embrace the coils… you’ve got to do it!”

Elsewhere in the chat, Nicole spoke about her new collaboration with doll company Capsule Chix. The Great News star has dialled into her own unique sense of style to create 13 custom looks for the toys.

“You’re no longer having somebody say, ‘This is a doll, this is what you should look like, this is what you should aim to be,'” she shared of the partnership. “It’s really giving whoever’s playing with it the authority to decide what they think is beautiful.”

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Nicole Richie will never wear red lipstick on a talk show

Nicole Richie refuses to compromise her personal style when it comes to public appearances.The socialite rose to fame after appearing on reality series The Simple Life alongside childhood best friend Paris Hilton from 2003 to 2007. The show’s success m…

Nicole Richie refuses to compromise her personal style when it comes to public appearances.

The socialite rose to fame after appearing on reality series The Simple Life alongside childhood best friend Paris Hilton from 2003 to 2007. The show’s success meant that plenty of top talk shows were keen to have Nicole as a guest who, back then, struggled with how to present herself.

“I remember when I did my first round of press for TV right after the first season of The Simple Life and… for whatever reason, I felt like I needed to present myself in a certain way,” she shared in an interview with Paper magazine. “I remember thinking, for example, When I go on a talk show, I have to wear a dress and heels – this is the talk show attire. And that was something I always struggled with because it wasn’t me.”

The 36-year-old crafted her own individual look as she got older, and finally insisted she would only wear outfits she felt totally comfortable in.

“It’s little things, like I don’t wear red lipstick when I’m going to do a talk show,” she explains. “If I have to speak, it’s just not who I am. I just can’t do it. Also – I’m cold all the time, so if there’s an opportunity for me to throw a turtleneck under something or wear something that’s beautiful and long-sleeved, I will absolutely do it.”

The Great News actress also refuses to “hide behind a lot of hair or a lot of make-up” and is a big fan of bright colours and bold prints.

“It gives my 5’1″ soul a little bit of height to wear something that’s going to elevate my mood,” she laughed.

Nicole is also founder of her own fashion label, House of Harlow 1960, which celebrates its 10th birthday this year.

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