Mary Katrantzou cried when Temple of Poseidon show got approved

Designer Mary Katrantzou cried when Greek officials gave their approval for her to stage a fashion show at the ancient Temple of Poseidon in Athens. The Greek fashion designer, who lives and works in London, will present her ready-to-wear spring/summe…

Designer Mary Katrantzou cried when Greek officials gave their approval for her to stage a fashion show at the ancient Temple of Poseidon in Athens.

The Greek fashion designer, who lives and works in London, will present her ready-to-wear spring/summer 2020 collection at the Ancient Greek temple, which is one of the major monuments of the Golden Age of Athens, on Thursday.

The event will mark the first time a designer has ever staged a runway show at the historical site, which is perched above the sea, and will also be the first it’s ever been used for a private event, so the 36-year-old was so shocked to get approval for the show that she cried.

“It’s very difficult because it needs to be approved by both the Ministry of Culture and KAS (Central Archaeological Council) and that whole process took over six months,” Katrantzou told Vogue Australia. “In July we achieved what, by this time, I thought was impossible and got the yes. It was so unexpected I cried and it’s the first time in the 10 years I’ve worked in the fashion industry that I’ve had that reaction.”

KAS, the advisory board that protects ancient monuments and archaeological sites, are famously strict and had previously rejected Gucci’s bid to host a fashion show at the Acropolis back in 2017.

Explaining why she wanted to present her show there, Katrantzou said, “You feel completely removed, it’s a place where as a teenager I would go and collect my thoughts. Even though it’s inundated with tourists now, you really feel connected to the elements. There’s no other monument I’ve visited that’s joined to the sky and the sea, and the earth like the Temple of Poseidon.”

The designer, who celebrated her label’s 10th anniversary last year, believes one of the reasons her bid got approved was because she’s working with UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Marianna Vardinoyannis and a proportion of the seats will be available via donation to the philanthropist’s organisation, Association of Friends of Children with Cancer (ELPIDA).

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Manolo Blahnik will never design running shoes

Manolo Blahnik will never be tempted to design a line of running shoes.The Spanish designer’s luxury footwear is a staple of the fashion world, with celebrity fans including Jennifer Aniston, Blake Lively, Olivia Palermo and Miranda Kerr. However, Blah…

Manolo Blahnik will never be tempted to design a line of running shoes.

The Spanish designer’s luxury footwear is a staple of the fashion world, with celebrity fans including Jennifer Aniston, Blake Lively, Olivia Palermo and Miranda Kerr.

However, Blahnik has now shared that he remains committed to his signature elegant aesthetic and has no desire to enter into the trendy athleisure market.

“They said to me that I should do a wonderful collection of running shoes and I said, ‘What?! I’m not vile like that!'” he shared in an interview with The Telegraph. “I’m not into this at all. It’s for the new tacky generation.”

Blahnik went on to explain that his next collection of footwear may be inspired by a recent trip to the ancient city of Delphi in Greece, though he is yet to settle on the exact look and will never resort to copying.

“I love going around the Benaki museum in Athens – you have everything you want! I could copy it all, but I hate that. It can inspire you and you can use the details and mood, but I can’t copy,” the 76-year-old insisted. “My mother always said I was a contradictorian – if anything was fashionable, I would run a mile.”

Meanwhile, a number of Blahnik’s creations are to be showcased in a new exhibition entitled An Enquiring Mind: Manolo Blahnik at the Wallace Collection. The curated collection of shoes are placed alongside the paintings, sculpture and furniture items at the venue in London.

“The Wallace Collection has been a point of reference for me since my early days in London. It was – and remains – one of my favourite museums with the most refined selection of art. I am incredibly humbled and honoured to be a part of the project and have my work displayed at the museum,” he said in a statement.

The exhibition opens on Monday and will run until 1 September.

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Mary Katrantzou praying for people of Greece following fatal wildfires

Mary Katrantzou is praying for the people of her home country Greece after deadly wildfires ripped through parts of the nation.At least 79 people have died after fires, coupled with gale force winds, swept through coastal towns just outside of Athens i…

Mary Katrantzou is praying for the people of her home country Greece after deadly wildfires ripped through parts of the nation.

At least 79 people have died after fires, coupled with gale force winds, swept through coastal towns just outside of Athens in recent days.

Many people living and holidaying in Mati, Rafina and Kineta fled on foot to the sea in order to escape the devastating blaze, but those trying to leave via their cars or who stayed in their properties sadly lost their lives.

Accordingly, designer Katrantzou, who was born in Athens, has taken to Instagram to pay tribute to the people who died and praise the firefighters working in the area.

“74 people dead and counting.. This is so horrific and deeply heartbreaking.. looking at the images of Greece fighting against the magnitude of this tragedy. Praying that there will be no more casualties.. Huge love and respect to the firefighters who are giving their heart, so we can survive this #prayforgreece,” she wrote along with red and black heart emojis.

She also uploaded four harrowing images showing the flames raging, as well as people huddled in the sea.

Lots of her followers commented with the praying hands emoji.

Katrantzou, who studied at prestigious London design school Central Saint Martins, has always been proud of her Greek roots and often calls on them while designing.

“There’s a lot of Greek influence in my latest collection, with its classical draping and pleating. The lacework is in the tradition of bridalwear and folk costumes at the Benaki Museum in Athens. You just don’t find that level of intricacy these days, now that everything is digitised,” she told Conde Nast Traveller in 2014.

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