Steve Coogan: ‘Greed is not a direct attack on Philip Green’

Steve Coogan has insisted his new movie Greed isn’t a “direct attack” on businessman Philip Green, despite using the controversial retail mogul as an inspiration.Coogan’s fictional character in the film, Sir Richard McCreadie, is loosely based on Green…

Steve Coogan has insisted his new movie Greed isn’t a “direct attack” on businessman Philip Green, despite using the controversial retail mogul as an inspiration.

Coogan’s fictional character in the film, Sir Richard McCreadie, is loosely based on Green, with the film’s storylines taking inspiration from many of the news stories surrounding the British entrepreneur, including alleged tax avoidance and lavish celebrity-filled parties.

However, the comedian has insisted to the BBC that the movie is not a “direct attack” on the Arcadia Group chairman, but that his lavish lifestyle and outspoken manner provided a good hook for a film about how the wealthy exploit people.

“There are many people who make their money by exploiting people,” he explained. “Most of them behave discreetly and they don’t want to draw attention to themselves, but (Green is) the reverse.

“For a long time, he was like, ‘Check me out, see how successful I am. Look at my money. Look at my parties. Look at my friends.’ Because he’s a charismatic figure, it was a good basis on which to develop this movie idea.

“Even though (my character is) horrible to people he’s got a funny turn of phrase, so you go along for the ride and that’s important. If it’s just obnoxious, reprehensible behaviour then you’re not going to stick around too long.”

Although he was a divisive figure due to his wealth and tax arrangements, Green was also often seen in the company of stars, including Kate Moss, who designed for his Topshop chain, until he was accused of bullying and sexual harassment in 2018. He has denied all allegations and a U.S. case against him was dismissed last month.

Friends of Green have said he will not watch the film, telling Britain’s Sunday People he’s avoiding it because he’s heard “it’s a load of s**t”.

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Shanina Shaik considered quitting modelling ‘many times’

Shanina Shaik has “wanted to give up” on her modelling career many times.The Australian beauty moved to New York City as a teenager to achieve her dream of becoming a model and made her debut at New York Fashion Week in 2009, before scoring her breakth…

Shanina Shaik has “wanted to give up” on her modelling career many times.

The Australian beauty moved to New York City as a teenager to achieve her dream of becoming a model and made her debut at New York Fashion Week in 2009, before scoring her breakthrough in 2011 when she was cast in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show.

Despite her success, Shanina has admitted to Vogue Australia that she has considered quitting the modelling industry many times in the past.

“Honestly, there are so many times where I’ve wanted to give up! I’m like, ‘I might quit modelling now… I don’t know.’ But having people around you who really care about you definitely keeps you going,” she candidly confessed.

The 28-year-old, who appeared on Australian reality show Make Me a Supermodel, added that she had to prove her critics wrong at the start of her career because they thought she couldn’t do high fashion.

“At the beginning of my career, a lot of people thought I was quite commercial and that I couldn’t do high fashion, so that gave me a lot of insecurities,” the star continued. “Then I had this one amazing year where I booked Victoria’s Secret, which had always been a huge goal of mine. And I walked for the Chanel show too. It felt good to prove people wrong, but it also showed me how important it is to believe in yourself and have a good team.”

Shanina recently moved to Los Angeles and is pursuing an acting career, having scored a role in Greed alongside Steve Coogan and Isla Fisher.

“It was quite different to modelling, but I really enjoyed the process of it,” she said of the shoot. “I think being on camera so much helps in some way, but it’s not just still imagery. With acting, you’re constantly moving and being seen from every angle – you can’t hide!”

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