Fans spot plastic water bottle in Little Women scene

Eagle-eyed viewers have noticed a rogue plastic water bottle in a scene in Greta Gerwig’s period drama Little Women. The latest movie adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel, starring Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh, Timothee Chalamet, and Meryl …

Eagle-eyed viewers have noticed a rogue plastic water bottle in a scene in Greta Gerwig’s period drama Little Women.

The latest movie adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel, starring Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh, Timothee Chalamet, and Meryl Streep, was released in December and became a critical and commercial success, with it going on to be nominated for six Oscars, including Best Picture.

However, following its digital release in March, keen fans began to notice an error in one scene, with them sharing stills of Chalamet, in his period costume, standing in front of a table, where a modern hydro flask can be found. In the same shot, a plastic Poland Spring water bottle can be seen in the background – despite the film being set in the 1860s.

The mistake was first spotted by TikTok user Madelyn Rancourt, who shared a video of the scene on the app, and said, “All right, so I’m a very big fan of Little Women. I have the official movie companion book, I have the Louisa May Alcott book with cast photos and I did see it seven times in theatres and went to a Q&A with the cast in New York and saw the film before it came out.

“So, I’ve seen it many times and while watching it I’ve watched this scene with them in their house so many times, with Jo saying she loves the books and Amy hurting her hand… I don’t know if anyone else noticed but there is a hydro flask and a Poland Spring water bottle just casually sitting there during some of the scene. Let me know if you noticed this.”

The mistake has since gone viral on social media, with users sharing screengrabs and expressing their shock.

Others also likened it to the famous Game of Thrones error, in which a coffee cup was left in front of Emilia Clarke’s character Daenerys Targaryen in the final season of the show, which aired last year.

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Bong Joon Ho would love to make a musical

Bong Joon Ho would love his next movie to be a musical.The 50-year-old South Korean director won critical acclaim and a host of awards for his black comedy thriller Parasite, but now he’s keen to tackle a different kind of project. “I would love to mak…

Bong Joon Ho would love his next movie to be a musical.

The 50-year-old South Korean director won critical acclaim and a host of awards for his black comedy thriller Parasite, but now he’s keen to tackle a different kind of project.

“I would love to make a musical,” Bong told Empire magazine, noting that his take on the genre would be unique. “Characters would begin singing, then think, ‘Oh my God, f**k this, this is too cheesy,’ and stop suddenly.

“There are amazing musical films, like Singin’ in the Rain. But when I watch them, I feel very embarrassed and start blushing. So it would have to be… different.”

Bong stunned Hollywood when the critically-acclaimed Parasite won Best Picture, Best Director, Best International Film, and Best Original Screenplay at the Oscars last month.

The filmmaker may well live up to his promise of making a “different” musical, as he’s well-known for telling unusual stories on the big screen. His Academy Award-winning film followed members of a poor family who scheme to become employed by a wealthy one by infiltrating their household, while his 2017 movie Okja told the story of a young girl who raises a genetically modified giant pig.

And Bong’s timing could be perfect, as the musical genre is currently making a comeback in Hollywood, with Steven Spielberg’s remake of West Side Story and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s cinematic adaptation of his musical In the Heights both in the works.

Little Women director Greta Gerwig is also developing an original musical that focuses on tap dancing.

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Natalie Portman honours snubbed female directors in Dior cape at 2020 Oscars

Natalie Portman had the names of snubbed female directors embroidered into her Dior cape at the 2020 Oscars.The 38-year-old made a powerful statement at the prestigious event on Sunday, and walked the red carpet in a black floor-length gown with intric…

Natalie Portman had the names of snubbed female directors embroidered into her Dior cape at the 2020 Oscars.

The 38-year-old made a powerful statement at the prestigious event on Sunday, and walked the red carpet in a black floor-length gown with intricate gold embellishment.

The dress was overlaid with a black cape, which was embroidered with the names of several female filmmakers in gold thread.

Natalie told Los Angeles Times journalist Amy Kaufman that her decision to wear the cape was to “recognise the women who were not recognised for their incredible work this year in my subtle way.”

Stitched onto the Dior cape were the names of Hustlers director Lorene Scafaria, The Farewell’s Lulu Wang, Greta Gerwig for Little Women, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood’s Marielle Heller, as well as Atlantics’ Mati Diop, Queen & Slim’s Melina Matsoukas, Honey Boy’s Alma Har’el, and Celine Sciamma for Portrait of a Lady on Fire.

Har’el, who didn’t attend the ceremony, shared a picture of Natalie’s outfit and then a close-up of her surname on the cape, and wrote on Twitter, “My first time at the #Oscars couldn’t have been more beautiful.”

And this isn’t the first time that Natalie, who scooped the Best Actress gong at the Oscars in 2011 for her role in Black Swan, has openly criticised Hollywood for failing to recognise female filmmakers.

At the Golden Globes back in 2018, Natalie famously called out the awards for the lack of female representation as she presented the Best Director category.

“Here are all the male nominees,” she stated as the five male nominees, including Christopher Nolan and Guillermo del Toro, were introduced.

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Anna Wintour predicts Little Women costume designer will win Oscar

Anna Wintour has predicted Little Women’s Jacqueline Durran will win the Academy Award for Best Costume Design on Sunday.The fashion journalist, who has served as editor-in-chief of U.S. Vogue since 1988, is one of the most important figures in the ind…

Anna Wintour has predicted Little Women’s Jacqueline Durran will win the Academy Award for Best Costume Design on Sunday.

The fashion journalist, who has served as editor-in-chief of U.S. Vogue since 1988, is one of the most important figures in the industry and is constantly keeping an eye out for future trends.

For the latest instalment of her Go Ask Anna video series, Wintour was asked about the films she believed had the best costume and styling of late, and accordingly, she named Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Greta Gerwig’s Little Women.

“I have to pick two films, (where the Vogue team) felt the costumes were extraordinary. The first one would be Once Upon a Time in Hollywood – the costumes were designed by Arianne Phillips. The look of the movie, which was set at the end of the ’60s, early ’70s, was so like an Alessandro Michele show for Gucci, you could put the two side-by-side and you couldn’t tell the difference,” she said. “And then the other film where we loved the way it looked was Little Women, where the clothes were designed by Jacqueline Durran. It was set in the Civil War era, obviously very Victorian. If you personally wanted to be inspired by that look for yourself, you might want to look at Brock (Collection), or Erdem, or even Louis Vuitton.”

After a brief pause, Wintour continued: “If I was going to choose one, I’d say she (Durran) deserves to win.”

Phillips and Durran will be competing against The Irishman’s Sandy Powell and Christopher Peterson, Jojo Rabbit’s Mayes C. Rubeo, and Joker’s Mark Bridges at the Oscars, with the winner to be named during the ceremony on Sunday night. Durran recently won the BAFTA for Best Costume Design.

Elsewhere in the conversation, Wintour also named The Farewell, directed by Lulu Wang and starring Awkwafina, and Bong Joon Ho’s Parasite as two of her must-see films.

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Greta Gerwig was unable to vote for herself for Best Director Oscar

Greta Gerwig was unable to vote for herself for a Best Director Oscar because she’s a member of the Academy’s acting branch. The 36-year-old first rose to fame as an actress in films such as Frances Ha, No Strings Attached, and Jackie, so when she was …

Greta Gerwig was unable to vote for herself for a Best Director Oscar because she’s a member of the Academy’s acting branch.

The 36-year-old first rose to fame as an actress in films such as Frances Ha, No Strings Attached, and Jackie, so when she was asked to become a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) in 2016, she was invited as an actor, meaning she can only vote on the acting categories for the annual Academy Awards.

However, Gerwig recently moved into writing and directing with 2017’s Lady Bird and 2019’s Little Women, for which many hoped she would be nominated for Best Director. She was ultimately snubbed in the category in favour of all-male nominees, something which caused an uproar on social media.

In an interview with Variety, Gerwig said that while she had no expectations of being nominated, “there was clearly a chance,” and added, “There’s probably a handful of votes that went that way. I mean, mine did – oh no, I can’t!”

The filmmaker then explained that she was planning to switch branches from acting to directing and commented: “I think that the directors’ branch could probably stand to bolster its lady numbers… This will go to the top of my to-do list!”

Little Women received six Oscar nominations, including a nod for Best Picture. And Gerwig was also thrilled that her partner Noah Baumbach landed six nominations for his movie Marriage Story.

“It felt like it (the Best Picture nomination) was for everyone… So, there was a lot of ecstatic texting among the Little Women chain,” she continued. “Noah’s across the room, and he was like, ‘I got six too!’ I don’t know, it was an amazing day.”

Elsewhere, Gerwig confessed that she had been carefully monitoring the impressive box office performance of Little Women because she knows the takings dictate whether she gets another opportunity to direct, something she really wants.

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Carey Mulligan calls for overhaul of Oscars voting system

Carey Mulligan has called for an overhaul of the Oscars voting system as she believes it’s “not working”.The British actress discussed the all-male Best Director nominees at the upcoming Academy Awards during an interview at the Variety Studio at the S…

Carey Mulligan has called for an overhaul of the Oscars voting system as she believes it’s “not working”.

The British actress discussed the all-male Best Director nominees at the upcoming Academy Awards during an interview at the Variety Studio at the Sundance Film Festival.

Sharing her disappointment at the lack of acknowledgement for female-directed films such as Little Women, Hustlers and The Farewell, Mulligan said the voting system is “not working” and suggested that every member of the Academy should have to prove they have seen “every single” eligible film.

“I don’t think you can watch those films and not think they deserve recognition,” the 34-year-old explained. “I think they need to be watched. I wonder if the system works in terms of getting sent 100 screeners. Maybe you shouldn’t be allowed to vote unless you can prove you’ve seen every single one. There should be a test. The films that did get left out are indisputably brilliant.”

Mulligan told reporters that while it was positive the movies were getting made by female directors, it was only “baby steps” and more action needed to be taken to get women recognised for their achievements.

“People simply aren’t seeing these films because I think if they did they would be moved to vote for them. The system doesn’t work. For a film like Hustlers and a performance like Jennifer Lopez’s, (if it) can’t get recognised then something’s not working,” she said, noting the star’s surprising snub from the Best Supporting Actress category.

“And Greta Gerwig, again producing an incredible film and not getting recognition as a director, there’s just something that needs fixing but I’m not the smart person to fix it,” the Oscar-nominated actress concluded.

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Greta Gerwig goes ‘feral’ while making movies

Greta Gerwig goes “feral” while making movies, because she becomes so dedicated to the project.The director has received critical acclaim for her recent adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s iconic novel Little Women, which stars Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson…

Greta Gerwig goes “feral” while making movies, because she becomes so dedicated to the project.

The director has received critical acclaim for her recent adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s iconic novel Little Women, which stars Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Meryl Streep, Laura Dern, Florence Pugh, and Timothee Chalamet.

She has candidly revealed that while on the set of her films, she becomes so involved in the process that she almost turns animalistic.

“Everyone who works with me can attest to this – I go into a zone where I don’t wash or return calls and I go feral,” Gerwig told Elle UK magazine. “I can go into hyperfocus as well as becoming more scattered.”

She went on to add that she thinks she would’ve been good in a newsroom, because she “likes things that have a great deal of pressure and a lot of deadlines, because I need it.”

However, the 36-year-old readily admitted that she’s good at taking charge of the cast and crew on the sets of her films and trusts her own instincts.

“I mean, they all want to do what you say. It’s not like I’m teaching a class full of kids who are resistant to learning algebra,” she joked. “They are people who would like to please me.”

Despite previously admitting that working with Hollywood legend Streep “terrified” her, Gerwig stated that she likes to collaborate with her actors.

“I think there are some directors who wish they could clone themselves 200 times to do every job on set themselves, but I like people bringing things and surprising me. You want them to see the film and feel like, Well, that is what I gave you. You didn’t misuse my gift,” she explained.

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Saoirse Ronan and Florence Pugh disappointed by Greta Gerwig’s Oscars snub

Saoirse Ronan and Florence Pugh are disappointed about their Little Women director Greta Gerwig being snubbed by the Academy Awards.The period drama, adapted from Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel, scooped six Oscar nominations on Monday, including Bes…

Saoirse Ronan and Florence Pugh are disappointed about their Little Women director Greta Gerwig being snubbed by the Academy Awards.

The period drama, adapted from Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel, scooped six Oscar nominations on Monday, including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Costume Design, Best Original Score, Best Actress for Ronan, and Best Supporting Actress for Pugh.

While the actresses were thrilled with their nominations, they were shocked to learn Gerwig hadn’t been recognised for Best Director, a category which compromised of all-male nominees.

Ronan told Deadline she was “scratching (her) head a bit” over the filmmaker’s surprising exclusion.

“I’m really happy that the Academy recognised her for Adapted Screenplay and Picture, and I feel like if you’ve been nominated for Best Picture, you have essentially been nominated for Best Director,” the 25-year-old said in a statement. “But to me, Greta, since she started, has made two perfect films, and I hope when she makes her next perfect movie, she gets recognised for everything, because I think she’s one of the most important filmmakers of our time.”

British star Pugh, who earned her first-ever Oscar nomination for playing spoiled sister Amy March, said Greta’s absence was a “big blow”.

“Especially because she created a film that is so her and so unique and it’s just come out of her, and it’s been a story she’s wanted to do for so long,” she shared. “I think everybody’s angry and quite rightly so. I can’t believe it’s happened again, but I don’t really know how to solve it. I don’t know what the answer is, other than we’re talking about it.”

She added that the snub highlights the importance of the story in Little Women.

“Greta made a film about women and their relationship with money, and their relationship with men in a man’s working world. And it’s just highlighting the point. It’s just completely underlining how important this film is, and how the themes are still apparent now,” she said.

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Greta Gerwig was ‘terrified’ to direct Meryl Streep

Greta Gerwig was “terrified” to direct three-time Oscar winner Meryl Streep in her new movie adaptation of Little Women.The filmmaker was beginning to put together her cast for the period drama when Streep reached out and expressed her interest in the …

Greta Gerwig was “terrified” to direct three-time Oscar winner Meryl Streep in her new movie adaptation of Little Women.

The filmmaker was beginning to put together her cast for the period drama when Streep reached out and expressed her interest in the project, based on the literary classic by Louisa May Alcott, and bagged the role of Aunt March.

However, Greta has now admitted that it was a daunting experience making a movie with the acting legend, as she was intimidated by her excellence on set.

“I was terrified as a director, because what am I going to say to her? She’s so smart and she knows more about how films are made than anyone,” the 36-year-old told Elle UK. “There were a couple of lines I wrote to get a character from A to B, inelegantly, and you know when Meryl asks, ‘Now why do I say that?’ you’d better have a f**king good answer.”

Revealing her fear of looking silly in front of the movie icon, she added: “It’s intimidating, but it forces you to be better. Unfortunately, it’s uncomfortable to get better, because it means you have to look like an idiot in front of her. But she’s fabulous.”

Despite her apprehensiveness in front of Streep, Gerwig seems to have built a rapport with her cast, which also includes Saoirse Ronan, Florence Pugh, Emma Watson, and Timothee Chalamet.

Praising the director, Chalamet commented to the publication: “She has a way of talking with actors that is uniquely insightful. That’s perhaps because she’s an actress herself, but also because she has this intuitive way of speaking about movies, about acting and about the direction of a story.”

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Female directors behind record-breaking number of movies in 2019

Filmmakers including Greta Gerwig, Jennifer Lee, and Anna Boden helped propel female-directed movies to record-breaking levels in 2019.Out of the 100 highest-grossing movies of the year, 10.6 per cent of them were directed by female filmmakers, a jump …

Filmmakers including Greta Gerwig, Jennifer Lee, and Anna Boden helped propel female-directed movies to record-breaking levels in 2019.

Out of the 100 highest-grossing movies of the year, 10.6 per cent of them were directed by female filmmakers, a jump from just 4.5 per cent in 2018, according to the University of Southern California (USC) Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, reported Variety.

Movies including Gerwig’s Little Women, Lorene Scafaria’s Hustlers, animated sequel Frozen 2, which was co-directed by Lee and Chris Buck, and Captain Marvel, which was helmed by Boden and Ryan Fleck, all scored box office hits.

Olivia Wilde’s Booksmart, Melina Matsoukas’s Queen & Slim and Lulu Wang’s The Farewell were also among 2019’s most popular female-directed flicks.

“It illuminates where we’re seeing traction and where there’s room for improvement,” said one of the study’s authors, Stacy L. Smith. “Universal under (studio chief) Donna Langley should be lauded for ensuring that women get opportunities.”

Smith also predicted that 2020 will be even better, with female directors being handed the reins of big superhero movies such as Birds of Prey, Eternals, Black Widow, and Wonder Woman 1984 as well as the Disney live-action remake of Mulan.

“2020 will be an extraordinary year for female directors,” she added. “That’s important, because we’re seeing women being given opportunities to direct action movies and not just smaller, independent films… Progress will come when females are given the opportunity to carry movies behind the camera across genres and budget ranges.”

The study comes weeks after the 2020 Golden Globe nominees were announced, sparking outrage that the Best Director category featured all-male candidates once again.

The prize, which will be handed out on Sunday, will be between Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’s Quentin Tarantino, 1917’s Sam Mendes, Joker’s Todd Phillips, Bong Joon-Ho for Parasite, and Martin Scorsese for The Irishman.

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