Tom Ford gearing up to launch ‘science-based’ skincare line

Tom Ford is close to unveiling his “science-based” luxury skincare range.The 57-year-old served stints as creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent before launching his eponymous fashion and beauty brand in 2006 and has more recently delved int…

Tom Ford is close to unveiling his “science-based” luxury skincare range.

The 57-year-old served stints as creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent before launching his eponymous fashion and beauty brand in 2006 and has more recently delved into filmmaking with critically acclaimed movies A Single Man and Nocturnal Animals.

While Tom Ford Beauty currently contains a range of cosmetics and fragrance, Ford has been developing a line of skincare formulas for several years and will begin rolling out the line next month.

“I wanted to start a serious skincare arm and have it be science-based,” he told WWD. “This is a real skincare product and regimen. I’m not a designer who has thrown his name on a beautifully packaged cream.”

To create the products, Ford insisted Estee Lauder bosses allow him to set up his own laboratory.

And he drew inspiration from his own experiences and advice he’s received from dermatologists in the past, especially in relation to the power of caffeine.

“Years ago, a dermatologist told me that the best thing for puffy eyes was moist tea bags. Every time I did it, I noticed that it also moisturised my skin,” the designer shared. “Caffeine became one of the most important things we researched.”

After experimenting with 75 different concoctions, Ford’s first products, the Serum Concentrate and Creme Concentrate, which are infused with caffeine from Japanese green tea, gyokuro, and rare ground white porcelain cacao beans, will be hitting shelves from August, and will be priced at $350 and $450 (£280 – £360). Three more products will debut in spring 2020.

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Liya Kebede: ‘I had no desire to create a brand’

Liya Kebede accidentally became a fashion entrepreneur because she wanted to help weavers in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian model, who has worked with the likes of Gucci and Estee Lauder, founded Lemlem in 2008 after going to a market while visiting family i…

Liya Kebede accidentally became a fashion entrepreneur because she wanted to help weavers in Ethiopia.

The Ethiopian model, who has worked with the likes of Gucci and Estee Lauder, founded Lemlem in 2008 after going to a market while visiting family in Addis Ababa and noticing that the people who made handwoven clothes had no business. She used her own money to hire a designer, stylist and a few weavers to make Western-style clothes using those traditional techniques.

In a new interview with PORTER magazine, Liya admitted becoming the founder and creative director of a fashion brand was never one of her life goals.

“I am completely, 100 per cent, an accidental entrepreneur… I had no desire to do a brand,” she said, explaining that she had always wanted to help people in her native country but she “didn’t know in what capacity” and when she founded the label, “I thought I was just fixing something.”

Lemlem, which means “to bloom” in Amharic, now sells to vendors around the world and has recently opened offices in New York. It also employs 250 weavers in Addis Ababa and five per cent of its sales go to the Lemlem Foundation, which supports women artisans in Africa.

“Every time I see someone wearing Lemlem, I have a ‘wow’ moment – because I know how far we have come,” the 41-year-old gushed.

Liya has also collaborated with her designer friends, with her team recently adding colourful borders to “puffer” gowns created by Valentino’s Pierpaolo Piccioli for Moncler.

“It has this feeling of depth and warmth, and a sense that there is another dimension to them,” she continued. “It bridges these things that you didn’t think could be bridged.”

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Gucci pledges to contribute to restoration project in Rome

Gucci bosses have pledged $1.8 million (£1.4 million) to the restoration and conservation of Rome’s Belvedere Garden at Villa Tarpea. The Italian fashion house staged its resort 2020 show in May at the historic Capitoline Museums, which is nearby th…

Gucci bosses have pledged $1.8 million (£1.4 million) to the restoration and conservation of Rome’s Belvedere Garden at Villa Tarpea.

The Italian fashion house staged its resort 2020 show in May at the historic Capitoline Museums, which is nearby the historic area that dates back to the first century.

Now, Gucci is investing in restoring the area at Villa Tarpea – and the green area landscape located on the rock of the Capitoline Hill – over the next two years.

The project, called Rupe Tarpea: Between Legend and Future, is aimed at the restoration, preservation and improvement of the Tarpeian Rock in Rome, a steep cliff of the southern summit of the Capitoline Hill, overlooking the Roman Forum.

Marco Bizzarri, president and chief executive officer of the luxury label, said it was an honour to be involved in the restoration of history in Rome, which is the birthplace of Gucci’s creative director, Alessandro Michele.

“Being able to make a civil contribution to the eternal city, the birthplace of our creative director and which also houses our design office is an immense honour for me,” he said in a statement, according to WWD. “Alessandro and the contemporaneity of Gucci are in constant daily dialogue with the ancient world. It is an endless conversation because every day we are confronted with the weightless presence of our heritage. Contributing to the restoration of the Rupe Tarpea and its return to the citizens of Rome and its visitors, is for me and all at Gucci, an infinite joy.”

This is not Gucci’s first donation to restoration projects in Italy. Back in 2017, executives pledged $2.1 million to support the restoration of Florence’s Boboli Gardens when Michele decided to hold the brand’s cruise 2018 show at the Palatina Gallery overlooking the venue.

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Harry Styles leads new Gucci fragrance campaign

Gucci’s go-to campaign star Harry Styles has been chosen as one of the faces of the brand’s new genderless fragrance.Created by label head Alessandro Michele and perfumer Alberto Morillas, Gucci’s Memoire d’une Odeur is the first scent from the Italian…

Gucci’s go-to campaign star Harry Styles has been chosen as one of the faces of the brand’s new genderless fragrance.

Created by label head Alessandro Michele and perfumer Alberto Morillas, Gucci’s Memoire d’une Odeur is the first scent from the Italian fashion house to be designed with gender fluidity in mind.

Popstar Harry, who recently shot his third fashion campaign for Gucci, has been cast to front the ads alongside student and designer Harris Reed, musician Zumi Rosow and ’80s model Leslie Winer, among others.

“Today marks the announcement of a new fragrance and its faces, Gucci Memoire d’une Odeur. Alessandro Michele’s contemporary vision of a universal scent transcends gender and time,” a brand spokesperson said in a press release.

Of the ideas behind the perfume, a representative explained how Alessandro “imagined fragrance as an explorer of the power of memories, bringing them back from the past and making them live in our present”.

A picture on the Gucci Beauty Instagram page from the label’s recent cruise collection show, held in Rome on Tuesday, was captioned: “@harrystyles leads the cast of the campaign of new universal fragrance #GucciMemoire d’une Odeur, unveiled at the party for the #GucciCruise20 fashion show.

At the party, the British singer-songwriter and actor was shot by @bradelterman together with @alessandro_michele and the mix of talents and models who feature in the campaign including Zumi Rosow @fangusz666, @harris_reed, @arianapapademetropoulos, @olimpiadior, Leslie Winer and Stanislas Klossowski de Rola. @gucci #GucciBeauty #AlessandroMichele.”

At the show’s after-party, Harry teamed up with Fleetwood Mac legend Stevie Nicks. The pair previously performed together in March when Stevie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for a second time, as a solo artist. They also played together in 2017 when Harry brought The Chain star out to perform three songs with him during one of his Los Angeles concerts.

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Alessandro Michele references anti-abortion laws in new Gucci cruise line

Alessandro Michele has made a bold political statement with his latest Gucci cruise collection.The creative director showed off his latest designs in Rome on Tuesday; an eclectic mix of retro cuts, bold colours and preppy sportswear. In among the des…

Alessandro Michele has made a bold political statement with his latest Gucci cruise collection.

The creative director showed off his latest designs in Rome on Tuesday; an eclectic mix of retro cuts, bold colours and preppy sportswear.

In among the designs were even bolder statements, with Michele referencing the recent anti-abortion laws in some American states with the phrase “My Body My Choice” stitched across the back of one purple blazer, and the date May 22, 1978 – when Italian lawmakers passed the law for legal abortion – also included on pieces. The designer even embroidered an image of the female reproductive system onto one gown.

“My new cruise collection is, as usual, an homage to many things and to different cultures and historical moments,” Michele told WWD. “Among other citations, there are some references to the ’70s, a moment in time when boundaries were blurred compared with nowadays. A specific moment in time when different cultures were intermixed. It was a historical moment when women – finally – rejected all the constraints that were imposed in the previous centuries and they became free.

“That’s why I am paying homage to the Italian law regarding abortion, the law number 194. It’s unbelievable that around the world there are still people who believe that they can control a woman’s body, a woman’s choice. I will always stand behind the freedom of being, always.”

The fashion star went on to credit Gucci president and chief executive officer Marco Bizzarri for allowing him total freedom when it comes to the messages he wants to put across through his clothes.

Michele called it a “great opportunity” to be the head of one of the most famous and powerful fashion brands in the world, and he vowed to carry on mixing politics with design.

“My clothes, my shows, my campaigns and all the projects I am producing for Gucci are my voice, ‘my weapon’ of choice. I have been lucky, I’ve been the megaphone and I really want to use it for a purpose,” the 47-year-old stated.

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Prada lays out fur-free plans

Prada is the latest luxury label to ban fur.Headed up by Miuccia Prada, the Italian label has pledged to go fur-free from its spring/summer 2020 collection, which will debut as part of Milan Fashion Week in September. Prada executives made the announ…

Prada is the latest luxury label to ban fur.

Headed up by Miuccia Prada, the Italian label has pledged to go fur-free from its spring/summer 2020 collection, which will debut as part of Milan Fashion Week in September.

Prada executives made the announcement on social media on Wednesday, revealing they have entered into a collaboration with the Fur Free Alliance (FFA).

“Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design while meeting the demand for ethical products,” Miuccia added in her own statement.

Lorenzo Bertelli, Prada Group’s head of marketing and communications, commented that the ban is a response to shifting consumer attitudes as well as low demand for the animal product.

“Fur has never been part of the main pieces of Prada,” he said. “People are always asking for a more sustainable approach from the company … (consumers are) different from the past. They think everybody needs to do their part to have a more sustainable world and future.”

Currently, fur only accounts for less than 0.1 per cent of the materials used in production.

The news was welcomed by the FFA, with the group’s chairman Joh Vinding explaining: “The Prada group with its brands now joins a growing list of fur-free brands that are responding to consumers’ changing attitudes towards animals.”

Prada is the latest in a long line of luxury brands to banish fur. Gucci, Burberry, Chanel, Jean Paul Gaultier and Versace are among the big-name labels to turn their back on the material.

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Harry Styles fronts eclectic Gucci campaign

Harry Styles is the face of Gucci’s latest eclectic tailoring campaign. Serving up businessman chic in the images, the 25-year-old models a selection of pieces from the colourful collection, including a velvet cobalt blue two-piece suit, a fuchsia pink…

Harry Styles is the face of Gucci’s latest eclectic tailoring campaign.

Serving up businessman chic in the images, the 25-year-old models a selection of pieces from the colourful collection, including a velvet cobalt blue two-piece suit, a fuchsia pink blazer, and a grey collared cape.

In one image, shot by shot by filmmaker Harmony Korine and directed by Christopher Simmonds, Harry is seen standing behind a paper-strewn desk while on the phone, while another sees the singer in an untidy garden surrounded by swans and piglets.

For Gucci’s Pre-Fall 2019 men’s tailoring collection, creative director Alessandro Michele offers a refreshing take on formalwear, with flamboyant, colour-clashing, modern pieces, alongside crisp, fitted suits.

A video for the ad campaign was shared on Instagram by the Italian fashion house, and shows Harry walking around a seemingly abandoned house that is littered with antiques. He later spray paints the head of a broken statue, rips the pages out of a book, and combs the fine hair of one of the piglets seen running around the grounds.

It’s not the first time that Harry has fronted one of Gucci’s campaign – this is the third time he’s turned his hand to the world of high-fashion modelling for the label. And it’s often the Italian label Harry turns to for a big event, like the recent Met Gala.

The Dunkirk star’s stylist Harry Lambert recently hinted that his client is about to enter a whole new fashion chapter as the anticipation for his second solo album builds.

“It’s time to try something new and hopefully shock and inspire in a different way,” Lambert told Miss Vogue. “I know the fans love his outfits, so hopefully they will love what’s to come.”

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Gucci accused of cultural appropriation over turban-style headpiece

Gucci has been accused of cultural appropriation over the sale of a turban-inspired headpiece.In February, bosses at the Italian fashion house, led by creative director Alessandro Michele, were forced to issue an apology and set up diversity schemes af…

Gucci has been accused of cultural appropriation over the sale of a turban-inspired headpiece.

In February, bosses at the Italian fashion house, led by creative director Alessandro Michele, were forced to issue an apology and set up diversity schemes after fans pointed out that they were advertising a knitted jumper that resembled blackface – the controversial makeover white people adopt to look like black figures.

Now, Gucci has sparked outrage from the Sikh community over a cotton headwrap being sold for $790 (£618) by U.S. retailers such as Nordstrom, with the piece appearing to be very similar to the traditional headwear, also known as dastaar, which represents honour, self-respect, courage and piety.

“The Sikh turban is not just a fashion accessory, but it’s also a sacred religious article of faith. We hope more can be done to recognise this critical context. #appropriation,” an official from the New York Sikh Coalition wrote on Twitter, while Vancouver-based reporter Taran Parmar commented of the headpiece, “Seriously @Nordstrom @gucci ? The turban is one of the most important and symbolic articles of faith for Sikhs, and you’re selling it as a fashion accessory to make money? This isn’t the first time you’ve come under fire for cultural appropriation. Do better.”

In addition, another Twitter user named Aasees Kaur pointed out that those who wear turbans for religious reasons have been targets of violence in the past.

“This is beyond aggravating. Did someone at @gucci even bother to figure out what a dastaar (turban) means to Sikhs? Did it cross your minds to consider the history behind our identity? My people are discriminated against, even killed, for wearing a turban,” she stated.

The item was previously sold on the Nordstrom website with the description, “Indy Full Head Wrap”. It is no longer available.

Gucci’s turban was first unveiled during a runway presentation held as part of Milan Fashion Week in February 2018.

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Kering commits to only working with models aged over 18

Executives at fashion conglomerate Kering have reaffirmed their commitment to only hiring models over the age of 18.Over the past two years, bosses at top houses and media corporations have introduced new codes of conduct regarding photoshoots and runw…

Executives at fashion conglomerate Kering have reaffirmed their commitment to only hiring models over the age of 18.

Over the past two years, bosses at top houses and media corporations have introduced new codes of conduct regarding photoshoots and runway shows in light of the #MeToo movement and claims of sexual misconduct in the entertainment and fashion industries,

Now, bosses at Kering – which owns luxury brands like Gucci, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, and Alexander McQueen – have stated that they will only hire models aged over 18.

“As a global luxury group, we are conscious of the influence exerted on younger generations in particular by the images produced by our houses,” declared Francois-Henri Pinault, chairman and chief executive officer of Kering, in a statement. “We believe that we have a responsibility to put forward the best possible practices in the luxury sector and we hope to create a movement that will encourage others to follow suit.”

Back in September 2017, leaders at Kering and LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton introduced a charter with the aim of banning very thin and underage models from the runway.

The new regulation may mean models like Kaia Gerber, 17, miss out on gigs for a few months. However, a spokesperson for the company is adamant hiring models over the age of 18 signals further progress in a “continued commitment” to women.

“In our view, the physiological and psychological maturity of models aged over 18 seems more appropriate to the rhythm and demands that are involved in this profession. We are also aware of the role model element that images produced by our houses can represent for certain groups of people,” added Marie-Claire Daveu, Kering’s chief sustainability officer.

The new guidelines will be enacted as of the fall/winter 2020 shows.

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Stella McCartney joins forces with Google on new sustainable fashion initiative

Stella McCartney’s latest effort to ease the environmental impact of the heavily polluting fashion industry has seen her team up with Google.The vegan designer is known for her dedication to sustainability, and she’s worked hard within her own comp…

Stella McCartney’s latest effort to ease the environmental impact of the heavily polluting fashion industry has seen her team up with Google.

The vegan designer is known for her dedication to sustainability, and she’s worked hard within her own company to invent new materials which lessen the fashion footprint.

Now she’s joined forces with Google on the tech giant’s new mission: to determine the environmental impact of producing cotton and viscose through data processing.

Former Gucci vice president of retail, Maria McClay, realised Google could help educate in the fight for fashion sustainability soon after joining the technology firm.

“What came up time and time again was data. I thought to myself, ‘wow, we have this team, the Google Cloud team,’ and essentially what they do is they stitch together data,” she told Business of Fashion.

As well as bringing McCartney on board, fashion innovation consultancy Current Global is also playing a key role in the new project, which will be unveiled on Wednesday at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit, the industry’s annual sustainability gathering.

From there, they will be asking brands, manufacturers, non-profit organisations, academics and others to supply relevant data points.

The hope is to develop tools which will give brands a clearer view into their supply chain

“It’s a call to action … trying to get the fashion brands and people with data that’s very close to the source to work with us,” said Ian Pattison, Google Cloud’s UK head of engineering for retail customers. “We really want to … bring that data together, and put it in one place and make it visible to everybody.”

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