Iman refuses to let her daughter enter modelling business

Iman won’t allow her 18-year-old daughter to enter the modelling industry.The Somali-American supermodel first appeared in U.S. Vogue in 1976 and soon became a muse for many designers, including Gianni Versace, Calvin Klein, and Donna Karan. While Im…

Iman won’t allow her 18-year-old daughter to enter the modelling industry.

The Somali-American supermodel first appeared in U.S. Vogue in 1976 and soon became a muse for many designers, including Gianni Versace, Calvin Klein, and Donna Karan.

While Iman has enjoyed a long career in the fashion world, she has now confessed that she doesn’t want Alexandria ‘Lexi’ Jones, her daughter with her late husband David Bowie, to follow in her footsteps.

“Every agency, every designer, called me to say: ‘If she wants to, we’d love for her to model for us,'” she recalled to Porter magazine of the time she uploaded photos of Lexi to her Instagram page to mark her birthday in August (18). “I said: ‘No, she doesn’t.’ I know why they wanted to her to model – it’s because she is David Bowie’s daughter.”

Iman went on to share that Lexi is currently taking a gap year. She also admitted that her daughter thinks she is “overprotective” when it comes to keeping their lives out of the spotlight.

“She says I am overprotective,” the 63-year-old sighed. “But I told her, this can all wait, it isn’t going anywhere. Have a life that is private while you can, because one day soon it is going to be public, so enjoy this.”

During the chat, Iman spoke about her successful Iman Cosmetics company too. She launched the brand in 1994 after years of struggling to find the right foundation shades for her skin tone, with her trailblazing products leading the way for other cosmetics giants, like M.A.C and Fenty Beauty.

“Now, every brand has 40 shades of foundation, but Iman Cosmetics was one of the first that changed the way we think about make-up,” she smiled. “That will be my legacy, and I am very happy to be remembered that way.”

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Iman launches online Q&A series

Iman has launched an Instagram Q&A series.The legendary supermodel is inviting her followers to get in touch online and ask her questions about her life and career. Posting a short clip ahead of the first Dear Iman episode on Wednesday (29August18), Im…

Iman has launched an Instagram Q&A series.

The legendary supermodel is inviting her followers to get in touch online and ask her questions about her life and career.

Posting a short clip ahead of the first Dear Iman episode on Wednesday (29August18), Iman explained: “Hey everybody, tomorrow I am lunching Dear Iman. What is that? It’s an opportunity for you to ask me any question. But tomorrow, it’s all about beauty.”

Using the hashtag #DearIman, her fans can get in contact with their burning questions.

In an interview with Vogue Arabia earlier this year, the Somalian beauty, who lost husband David Bowie in 2016, spoke about how she championed for change during her modelling heyday.

“As my career progressed, I became the first black model to refuse to work for a lower wage than other girls. To me, I was providing the same service, so I had to be paid equally,” she said.

And she recalled how once, during a shoot for American Vogue, the make-up artist didn’t have foundation for black skin tones. This inspired the 63-year-old to launch her own beauty line, Iman Cosmetics, which debuted in 2004.

“When you work in the industry, your looks are your currency,” she said. “If you don’t have a good appearance, you won’t be booked again – and no one will blame the beauty team or the photographer. This made me start experimenting with make-up from an early stage. I would buy any foundation with pigment so I could mix and match.”

Iman also took to Instagram on Wednesday to mark what would have been Michael Jackson’s 60th birthday. She uploaded photos of the pair in costume on the set of the 1992 video for Michael’s Remember the Time, where Iman starred as the wife of Eddie Murphy’s Pharaoh.

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Iman shares her simple strategy for combatting discrimination in fashion

Iman makes a point of supporting brands that promote inclusivity and diversity in fashion.The Somalia-born supermodel was a muse for the likes of Halston, Gianni Versace, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and Yves Saint Laurent during her heyday as a high fash…

Iman makes a point of supporting brands that promote inclusivity and diversity in fashion.

The Somalia-born supermodel was a muse for the likes of Halston, Gianni Versace, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and Yves Saint Laurent during her heyday as a high fashion model and has since gone on to establish herself as a beauty mogul with her company, Iman Cosmetics.

Promoting diversity in the industry has long been at the forefront of Iman’s mind and she has now shared her simple strategy for combatting discrimination.

“If a designer boycotts me, I should boycott him,” she told actress Taraji P. Henson in an interview for the April (18) issue of Harper’s Bazaar magazine. “I’m not going to buy a bag from someone who doesn’t use black models. We should celebrate and highlight the people who actually step it up.”

Iman kicked off her modelling career in 1975, when she was discovered by photographer Peter Beard.

In the early days, she looked up to people such as Naomi Sims, who is widely credited as the first African-American supermodel and has recalled how different the business was then.

“Funnily enough, there were more black models working back when I started than there have been recently,” the 62-year-old said, adding that she was inspired to team with Bethann Hardison and Naomi Campbell to push for a new wave of faces a couple of years ago. “We talked about it in the press and to the CFDA, and I think we’re seeing the change on the runways and in campaigns.”

Iman, the widow of rock musician David Bowie, was named as a Fashion Icon by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) in 2010. While she counts that award as an important achievement, she doesn’t see it as any more important than any of her other accomplishments.

“It’s a weighty title, but at the same time the Fashion Icon Award is just a title. Of course, it’s nice that it comes from peers in the fashion industry,” she smiled.

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