Jason Clarke relieved Stephen King approves of Pet Sematary remake

Jason Clarke was relieved to learn that author Stephen King approved of the Pet Sematary remake.King’s 1983 horror novel was first adapted for the big screen in 1989, and it has now undergone the remake treatment, with the Australian actor playing Dr. …

Jason Clarke was relieved to learn that author Stephen King approved of the Pet Sematary remake.

King’s 1983 horror novel was first adapted for the big screen in 1989, and it has now undergone the remake treatment, with the Australian actor playing Dr. Louis Creed, who moves to a new home with his family and discovers a mysterious burial ground hidden in the woods behind it.

In a new interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Jason said he felt relieved to read emails in which the renowned horror writer gave his seal of approval, given that King didn’t hold back in voicing his issues with Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation of his 1977 novel The Shining.

“Of course, yeah. I like The Shining, and I’m sure Stephen appreciates that movie in some way. In the emails that I’ve seen, King understands that his work has to be interpreted,” Jason explained. “There’s no way just to do a straight adaptation of his book. The directors had to make it their own, which I think they’ve done. It’s wonderful to have that dialogue. It must be great for him to see his books be interpreted still, 30-40 years after they’ve been written.”

The First Man actor read the novel in his teens and was scared by it. Although he was a fan of the source material, Jason had to leave that behind and surrender to the script and his directors, Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer, when it came to the shoot.

“You have to shoot the film in the end; the script is what you’re shooting. It’s easy to make that mistake as an actor: to try and do the source material,” he continued. “If it’s not gonna work for the story that’s going to be told in the cinema, it’s gonna kind of run into a brick wall. So, that’s the director’s job — to guide you.”

However, he recalled a moment when he improvised a line which was inspired by a different character’s piece of dialogue in the novel.

“By understanding the source material, you find ways to bring out more of the book, when you can, while still shooting the script,” he added.

Pet Sematary, which also stars John Lithgow and Amy Seimitz, is due for release in April (19).

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Keira Knightley fears all she can do is act

Keira Knightley nearly quit acting but has stuck at it as she fears she’d struggle in any other career. The 33-year-old took a break from Hollywood in her early twenties after suffering from mental health problems, and at one point, was worried she’d …

Keira Knightley nearly quit acting but has stuck at it as she fears she’d struggle in any other career.

The 33-year-old took a break from Hollywood in her early twenties after suffering from mental health problems, and at one point, was worried she’d have to retire and try something that didn’t put her in the spotlight. However, she decided to stick to acting and now features in The Aftermath, a period drama set in the ruins of Germany following WWII.

“It was the only decision (taking a break),” she told U.K. magazine Stylist. “It was either that or give up, so I thought, ‘OK, I’m going to try and get (my career) to where I want it and see if I can make something sustainable and if I don’t then I’ll have to do something else.'”

The British beauty is still a star a decade later and is thankful for fame as she has no alternative plans.

“I’ve still not got a Plan B,” Keira explained. “And I’d be terrible at making jam. I made a lot recently – I have a plum tree and had a glut – and it wasn’t very good. We’ve still got jars in the house. No one eats it!”

The Pirates of the Caribbean star shares a three-year-old daughter named Edie with her husband, Klaxons rocker James Righton, and elsewhere in the interview, mused on the possible effect social media scrutiny will have on future generations.

“It does seem like the studies that are coming out now are saying there is a particular effect on young women,” she noted. “We can’t lose a generation because we haven’t put things in place. But what do I know?”

The Aftermath, which also stars Alexander Skarsgard and Jason Clarke, is now in cinemas.

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Keira Knightley fears all she can do is act

Keira Knightley nearly quit acting but has stuck at it as she fears she’d struggle in any other career. The 33-year-old took a break from Hollywood in her early twenties after suffering from mental health problems, and at one point, was worried she’d …

Keira Knightley nearly quit acting but has stuck at it as she fears she’d struggle in any other career.

The 33-year-old took a break from Hollywood in her early twenties after suffering from mental health problems, and at one point, was worried she’d have to retire and try something that didn’t put her in the spotlight. However, she decided to stick to acting and now features in The Aftermath, a period drama set in the ruins of Germany following WWII.

“It was the only decision (taking a break),” she told U.K. magazine Stylist. “It was either that or give up, so I thought, ‘OK, I’m going to try and get (my career) to where I want it and see if I can make something sustainable and if I don’t then I’ll have to do something else.'”

The British beauty is still a star a decade later and is thankful for fame as she has no alternative plans.

“I’ve still not got a Plan B,” Keira explained. “And I’d be terrible at making jam. I made a lot recently – I have a plum tree and had a glut – and it wasn’t very good. We’ve still got jars in the house. No one eats it!”

The Pirates of the Caribbean star shares a three-year-old daughter named Edie with her husband, Klaxons rocker James Righton, and elsewhere in the interview, mused on the possible effect social media scrutiny will have on future generations.

“It does seem like the studies that are coming out now are saying there is a particular effect on young women,” she noted. “We can’t lose a generation because we haven’t put things in place. But what do I know?”

The Aftermath, which also stars Alexander Skarsgard and Jason Clarke, is now in cinemas.

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Steven Knight: ‘I wanted to do something different’

Steven Knight wanted to get experimental and “do something different” with his new movie Serenity.The Peaky Blinders creator wrote and directed the neo-noir thriller which stars Matthew McConaughey as a fisherman named Baker Dill who is approached by h…

Steven Knight wanted to get experimental and “do something different” with his new movie Serenity.

The Peaky Blinders creator wrote and directed the neo-noir thriller which stars Matthew McConaughey as a fisherman named Baker Dill who is approached by his ex-wife Karen, played by Anne Hathaway, with a request to murder her abusive husband Frank (Jason Clarke).

However, there is a big plot twist which reveals that nothing is as it seems. 


The British writer has explained that he wanted to experiment with narrative in his independent film after delivering screenplays with traditional structures, like Allied and The Hundred-Foot Journey, for studios. 


“What I wanted to do was, as someone who works with the studio system and likes conventional narrative and three-act structure, I wanted do something different,” he explained before a screening of the film in London, according to WENN/Cover Media. “With this one, I wanted to create a narrative and then crash it into a tree and just have the wheel go flying down the road. 


“It’s meant to be experimental, it’s meant to be sort of arthouse, some great actors got involved and, of course, you don’t turn that down, so it got bigger and bigger.” 


He warned the audience against expecting “anything to be real or normal” and said he hopes it will provoke “real surprise”. 


“Some people are shocked by it, some people love it, some people hate it. I hope you enjoy it and see it for what it is which is a look at the way film narrative works,” he said to viewers. 


Serenity was filmed on the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius and also stars Djimon Hounsou, Diane Lane, and Jeremy Strong. It is in cinemas and available on Sky Cinema now.

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Alexander Skarsgard: ‘I’m not a method actor’

Alexander Skarsgard has never tried method acting because he needs to unwind when taking on dark or difficult roles. In his new movie The Aftermath, the suave Swedish actor stars as Stefan Lubert, a German architect who is forced to share his home wit…

Alexander Skarsgard has never tried method acting because he needs to unwind when taking on dark or difficult roles.

In his new movie The Aftermath, the suave Swedish actor stars as Stefan Lubert, a German architect who is forced to share his home with a British military officer and his wife, played by Jason Clarke and Keira Knightley respectively, in the wake of the Second World War.

Speaking to WENN/Cover Media at the film’s London premiere, Alexander described Stefan as a “broken man” who had lost his wife in the war, but said he had tried to keep things light and had avoided getting deep into the role like a method actor.

“I think I’m quite good at letting go,” he explained. “When I’m out shooting, I’m not a method actor, so it’s not like I have to stay in that headspace for three months. The darker the project, the more important it is when I’m not shooting, to have fun, get away, see friends, see family, see loved ones. Because that’s how I recharge so I can come back and have the energy for another day on a set that can be quite intense.”

In the film, Stefan and Keira’s character Rachael Morgan begin to develop forbidden feelings for each other, despite initially hating each other due to the trauma and loss both have suffered in the conflict. Alexander said one of his favourite things about filming the movie was spending time with the British actress and plotting out their onscreen chemistry.

“It was wonderful, we got to spend a week or two here in London before we went to Hamburg and Prague to shoot the movie,” he added. “We got to map out the relationship and that journey was very exciting to both of us. Because there’s so much animosity there in the beginning, and finding that love story through grief and understanding of the other person’s sadness. Both have broken hearts, and that’s the beginning of that connection and how that slowly builds was very interesting to explore with her.”

The Aftermath debuts in cinemas on Friday (1Mar19).

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Jason Clarke relished soldier role research for new film

Jason Clarke loved researching his role in The Aftermath as he got to spend time with real-life soldiers.The Aussie star plays a British military commander tasked with helping Germany recover after World War Two in James Kent’s wartorn romance.To pre…

Jason Clarke loved researching his role in The Aftermath as he got to spend time with real-life soldiers.

The Aussie star plays a British military commander tasked with helping Germany recover after World War Two in James Kent’s wartorn romance.

To prepare for the film, the star worked on his British accent and army mannerisms by meeting retired and serving U.K. troops.

“I spent a day with the Royal Guard here, and they put me through the drill stuff, and that was pretty cool,” Jason told Cover Media at the movie’s London premiere. “These men put their life into it, some 40 years of drilling. Teaching me how to punch it out and salute. Good men and women. They were very generous.”

The star also met British veterans to get a feel for how soldiers acted in the past and took a shine to one retired officer in particular.

“(I met) a wonderful field marshal, and he served me a shepherd’s pie,” he explained. “Meeting these old guys gave me a sense of what it is to command – of what it is to lead men. It’s a really interesting notion. How do you command men? We had a wonderful afternoon with him, telling stories, showing us how humour gets it done, how responsibility gets it done.”

In the film Jason’s character Lewis Morgan and his wife Rachel, played by Keira Knightley, move into the home of a German architect, played by Alexander Skarsgard, creating tension as she struggles to forgive him for the Nazi’s actions during the war.

Speaking about what it was like to work with Keira on such an intense drama, Jason said: “You need someone who’s going to challenge you, and be there with you and have a laugh with you as well – but also get it done.”

The Aftermath is released in March (19).

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Jason Clarke struggled with claustrophobic First Man scenes

Jason Clarke has admitted he almost needed a mild sedative to deal with filming the claustrophobic scenes in First Man.Jason stars opposite Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy in Damien Chazelle’s new film, which tells the story of the first man on the moon,…

Jason Clarke has admitted he almost needed a mild sedative to deal with filming the claustrophobic scenes in First Man.

Jason stars opposite Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy in Damien Chazelle’s new film, which tells the story of the first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong.

Damien decided on lots of scenes depicting the space man’s chosen career, which meant the cast including Ryan, Corey Stoll, as Buzz Aldrin, and Jason, who plays Ed White the first American to walk in space, all had to shoot in rockets.

“(It was) insanely claustrophobic. It was almost to the point where you needed a mild sedative. I don’t say that lightly,” Jason told British newspaper Metro. “Claustrophobia is not something you can just turn off. Damien really made no exceptions. The camera had to fit the reality and everybody had that mantra.

“The capsules were scaled to real life. It was not fun — we’re not pilots, we’re not used to doing this every day. So I wasn’t used to the fact I’m totally reliant once I was strapped in. I can’t do anything: my oxygen, my communications, my ability to get out, it’s beyond my control.”

The film is in cinemas now, with Kyle Chandler and Claire Foy also starring. And being cast in the La La Land director’s new movie was a dream come true for Australian star Jason.

“It was in my bucket list to do a space movie,” the 49-year-old smiled. “Blade Runner, 2001, they’re a couple of my favourites. To do this story, with this team and the access this team got, was a pleasure. The size and scope of this movie… that’s quite rare.”

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Jason Clarke stunned to discover true story behind Chappaquiddick

Actor Jason Clarke couldn’t believe the details surrounding U.S. politician Ted Kennedy’s fatal 1969 car accident when he first read the script for biopic Chappaquiddick. The Zero Dark Thirty star brings the former Senator to life onscreen in the movi…

Actor Jason Clarke couldn’t believe the details surrounding U.S. politician Ted Kennedy’s fatal 1969 car accident when he first read the script for biopic Chappaquiddick.

The Zero Dark Thirty star brings the former Senator to life onscreen in the movie, which centres on the events surrounding the tragedy, when the brother of late U.S. President John F. Kennedy drove his car off a bridge into a pond.

His passenger, Mary Jo Kopechne, drowned in the accident, but Kennedy didn’t report it to police for several hours after returning home, sparking a major investigation.

Jason was unaware of the headline grabbing story before he was sent the script to play Kennedy, and he struggled to wrap his head around the strange turn of events, which resulted in Kennedy simply receiving a two-month suspended sentence for leaving the scene of an accident.

“I read the script on a plane and this conundrum of this man and how he came out from this early act here, of a woman dead in a car that he caused (sic), to being elected to the Senate again!” he recalled.

“I was like, ‘Holy s**t, how does this happen?’ I was very upset and it was a long flight. My wife asked me if I liked it and I didn’t really know how to talk about it. I read it again off the plane and I was like, ‘Come on, this is not real. This couldn’t happen!'”

Clarke “went down the rabbit hole” as he researched the incident, but his findings only left him more perturbed about Kennedy’s mindset at the time.

“I didn’t know how to play this now,” he shared. “How do I play a guy that does this? How does anyone watch that?”

Clarke came to realise Kennedy must have been mentally scarred from losing his older brothers in shocking assassinations – first John in 1963, and then Robert F. Kennedy in 1968, while he was running for the presidency.

“It’s a very strange existence Ted has,” he mused. “I think that (family tragedies) played a big part in why he walked away from the car and didn’t report it. It gave me some context of the clinically depressed state that Ted was in, or at least an existential crisis. That’s what made it so compelling for me.”

The actor had to hire a dialect coach to help him perfect his accent as the late Massachusetts native, a task which was further complicated by the fake teeth he had to wear.

“My teeth are not like Ted’s. I don’t have that big a teeth; they’re smaller and crooked so it was (tough) to get the teeth to fit in so that I wouldn’t lisp or hurt, but also to get the size right…,” he explained.

“The accent took me months of drills, and working with a dialect coach was so specific, and then to put the teeth in (took a lot of work) because I couldn’t dentalise my T’s for a long time!”

Kennedy died from brain cancer in 2009, aged 77.

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