Designer Khalid Al Qasimi died of drug poisoning

Designer Khalid Al Qasimi died of drug poisoning after taking GHB and cocaine.The 39-year-old, founder of British-based label Qasimi, was found dead on 1 July in his luxury apartment in west London, where he had taken drugs with his friend Yohan Escoba…

Designer Khalid Al Qasimi died of drug poisoning after taking GHB and cocaine.

The 39-year-old, founder of British-based label Qasimi, was found dead on 1 July in his luxury apartment in west London, where he had taken drugs with his friend Yohan Escobar the night before, an inquest has heard.

Al Qasimi, who was the son of the ruler of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, launched his brand in 2008 with designer Elliott James Frieze, and showcased his spring 2020 collection in June, just days before his shock death.

Escobar, who was not treated as a suspect by police, told officers that the GHB they had taken was “particularly strong”, the coroner’s court in Westminster heard. He said he believed Al Qasimi was asleep when he left the flat, because he was on the floor and snoring.

Coroner Bernard Richmond said a postmortem report performed by Dr Michael Osborn confirmed that the cause of death was drug-related.

“It is quite clear from the detective I spoke with that the last person who saw him, Yohan, was spoken to and had explained they had been taking strong GHB and cocaine,” he added, noting that Al Qasimi was found in the same place that Escobar had left him.

“I am quite satisfied on the balance of probabilities that it was a drug-related death,” Richmond concluded.

At the time of his death, a spokesperson for Al Qasimi’s label said in a statement that he had died “unexpectedly,” but did not provide any further information.

His father, Sultan bin Muhammad Al-Qasimi, has ruled Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates since 1972, and expressed his sorrow in an Instagram post at the time, where he stated that his son was now “in the care of God”.

© Cover Media

Designer Khalid Al Qasimi dead at 39

Designer Khalid Al Qasimi has died at the age of 39.Officials from London’s Metropolitan Police received a report of “a sudden death at a residential property in Knightsbridge,” on Monday. A post-mortem examination carried out the following day has pro…

Designer Khalid Al Qasimi has died at the age of 39.

Officials from London’s Metropolitan Police received a report of “a sudden death at a residential property in Knightsbridge,” on Monday. A post-mortem examination carried out the following day has proved to be inconclusive.

Al Qasimi was the crown prince and second son of the ruler of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, and three days of mourning have been declared in the country.

His father, Sultan bin Muhammad Al-Qasimi, has ruled Sharjah since 1972, and expressed his sorrow in an Instagram post, where he stated that his son was now “in the care of God”.

A spokesperson for the designer’s label, Qasimi, added in a statement that Al Qasimi had died “unexpectedly,” but did not provide any further information.

“Khalid was praised for his tenacious yet sensitive exploration of social-political issues, particularly pertaining to the Middle East and its sometimes-strained relationship with the West, a subject very close to his heart and upbringing,” they commented. “His goal was to create ‘a world of beautifully crafted products infused with cultural, social and political undertones to inform and inspire.’ The design world has lost a great philosopher and artist, and we ask that the privacy of the family and brand are respected at this difficult time.”

Khalid moved to the U.K. at the age of nine and launched his brand in 2008 with designer Elliott James Frieze.

His showcased his spring 2020 collection in June and expressed a sense of hope and positivity to the war-torn Middle East.

Frieze said of his business partner and friend: “I’m shocked and saddened by Khalid’s passing. My thoughts and prayers go out to his entire family and his design team. He lives on in all of us and will never be forgotten.”

While Caroline Rush, chief executive officer of British Fashion Council, praised the “talented young designer” and offered her condolences to his loved ones.

“Khalid Qasimi was a talented young designer whose collections were modern, elegant and forward thinking,” she added.

© Cover Media

Vetements hit with criticism over divisive ‘Don’t Shoot’ T-shirt

Vetements has been criticised for including a T-shirt with the words “Don’t Shoot” in its latest line.The Zurich-based clothing brand, founded by Georgian designer Demna Gvasalia, is no stranger to controversy, having previously hit headlines for selli…

Vetements has been criticised for including a T-shirt with the words “Don’t Shoot” in its latest line.

The Zurich-based clothing brand, founded by Georgian designer Demna Gvasalia, is no stranger to controversy, having previously hit headlines for selling a T-shirt with the logo of courier company DHL on it in 2016 and the following year, releasing jewellery that doubles as drug paraphernalia.

However, Vetements is now facing scrutiny for including a white T-shirt with “Don’t Shoot” written in red text in Arabic, French, and English at its spring/summer 2020 show held as part of Paris Fashion Week: Men’s last week.

Noting that the top is similar to those worn by journalists in Lebanon during the Israeli invasion in 1982, one Twitter user named Sarina commented, “Didn’t know I couldn’t hate Vetements even more. This T-shirt was worn by War reporters in Beirut during the 1982 conflict between Lebanon and Israel. This war is the primary reason why I had to leave Lebanon to the U.S. then Canada. And Vetements thinks it’s a fashion piece?????????”

While Lebanese influencer Samar Seraqui de Buttafoco shared a lengthy post on Instagram in which she insisted Vetements’ T-shirt was “more serious” than cultural appropriation.

“This is business activism for DUMMIES. Hope you will act like a responsible consumer. Hope some fashion editors will dedicate time to think and report. Hope to more respectability in the fashion industry,” she wrote.

In addition, others pointed out that Khalid Al-Qasimi, founder of London-based brand Qasimi, had made a version of the original T-shirt for his fall 2017 collection with the intention of making a political statement.

Emphasising the he doesn’t have copyright to the logo, Al-Qasimi told Vogue Arabia: “I used that print to highlight the plight of something going on in the Middle East. For Vetements to use it in such a flippant and provocative manner; I don’t think they realise what these words mean to us Arabs.”

Representatives for Vetements and Gvasalia are yet to comment on the criticism.

© Cover Media