H&M to supply protective equipment for hospitals during coronavirus crisis

H&M is to begin making protective equipment for hospital workers amid the coronavirus crisis.In light of the escalating Covid-19 pandemic around the world, executives at the Swedish high street retailer have announced that they are quickly rearranging …

H&M is to begin making protective equipment for hospital workers amid the coronavirus crisis.

In light of the escalating Covid-19 pandemic around the world, executives at the Swedish high street retailer have announced that they are quickly rearranging their supply chain in order to start manufacturing personal protective equipment (PPE) for hospitals and healthcare workers.

“The coronavirus is dramatically affecting each and every one of us, and H&M Group is, like many other organisations, trying our best to help in this extraordinary situation,” commented Anna Gedda, head of sustainability at H&M Group. “We see this is as a first step in our efforts to support in any way we can. We are all in this together, and have to approach this as collectively as possible.”

Gedda hopes to start delivering as soon as possible. At present, approximately two-thirds of H&M’s stores around the globe have closed in response to government measures enacted to help slow down the spread of the virus. Customers can still shop online in 50 markets.

Elsewhere, executives at other major conglomerates are doing their part to aid hospital workers too, with leaders at Kering and Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) unveiling plans to supply millions of masks to people in France.

While top fashion designers, such as Prabal Gurung, Christian Siriano, and Brandon Maxwell, are also looking at converting their workshops so they can make medical masks and other PPE for hospital staff in New York.

Since the coronavirus outbreak started in Wuhan, China last December, there have been approximately 424,000 confirmed cases and an estimated 18,900 deaths.

© Cover Media

Saint Laurent and Balenciaga workshops to begin making medical masks

Employees at Saint Laurent and Balenciaga’s workshops will soon begin making medical masks.In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis around the world, bosses at Kering, the parent company of the luxury fashion houses, announced on Sunday that they …

Employees at Saint Laurent and Balenciaga’s workshops will soon begin making medical masks.

In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis around the world, bosses at Kering, the parent company of the luxury fashion houses, announced on Sunday that they are preparing to transform textile plants so they can start manufacturing surgical masks for hospitals in order to help support local health authorities.

“The French workshops of Kering’s Houses Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent are preparing to manufacture masks while complying with the strictest health protection measures for their staff members, with production getting underway as soon as the manufacturing process and materials have been approved by the relevant authorities,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

Leaders at Kering, the conglomerate helmed by Francois-Henri Pinault, have already provided the French health service with three million masks, following on from contributions made to China and Italy in recent weeks.

They are also making a financial donation to the Institut Pasteur in Paris to aid scientists in researching the Covid-19 pandemic.

Meanwhile, bosses at Kering’s main competitor Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have also pledged to supply millions of surgical masks to workers in France.

“By virtue of its global distribution network, LVMH has managed to secure an order with a Chinese industrial supplier for a delivery of 10 million masks in France in the coming days (seven million surgical masks and three million FFP2 masks). The order will be repeated for at least four weeks in similar quantities (i.e. approximately 40 million masks),” a spokesperson commented.

Last week, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault instructed the staff at LVMH Perfumes & Cosmetics, including those who make products for Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy, to prepare sites to begin making “substantial quantities” of hydroalcoholic gel.

The gel will be delivered free of charge to French health authorities and those working at Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, a network of teaching hospitals that treats more than eight million patients per year.

At present, there have been over 351,000 reported coronavirus cases around the world, with 15,000 deaths. China, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Iran, and the U.S. remain the worst affected nations.

© Cover Media

LVMH to make hand sanitiser for hospitals amid coronavirus crisis

Employees at perfume factories owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) are to begin manufacturing hand sanitiser for hospitals.In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis in France and around the world, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault has in…

Employees at perfume factories owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) are to begin manufacturing hand sanitiser for hospitals.

In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis in France and around the world, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault has instructed bosses at LVMH Perfumes & Cosmetics, including those who make products for Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy, to prepare sites to begin making “substantial quantities” of hydroalcoholic gel.

The gel will be delivered free of charge to French health authorities and those working at Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, a network of teaching hospitals that treats more than eight million patients per year.

“Through this initiative, LVMH intends to help address the risk of a lack of product in France and enable a greater number of people to continue to take the right action to protect themselves from the spread of the virus,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “LVMH will continue to honour this commitment for as long as necessary, in connection with the French health authorities.”

More than 170,000 people have been affected in 158 countries since the Covid-19 outbreak began in Wuhan, China back in December. Italy, Spain, and some parts of the U.S. have gone into lockdown to contain the spread of the virus, as more than 6,600 people have died.

In France, leaders have introduced sweeping restrictions across the nation, with cafes, restaurants, cinemas, and many non-essential stores now closed, while pharmacies have restricted customers to one bottle of sanitiser per person.

There has been over 5,400 coronavirus cases reported in the country, with 127 deaths.

© Cover Media

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh join 2020 LVMH Prize jury

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers …

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Tuesday, organisers announced that this year’s winner will be announced at an event held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris on 5 June, with McCartney and Louis Vuitton menswear designer Abloh among the panel.

Singer Rihanna, who launched her Fenty clothing label in partnership with the luxury conglomerate last year, will also be on the jury.

“For this seventh edition, I am delighted to announce the arrival of Virgil Abloh, former Prize finalist, Robyn Rihanna Fenty, and Stella McCartney in the jury of the LVMH Prize,” said Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, in a statement. “They will be joining our prestigious panel which includes: Jonathan Anderson, Kris Van Assche, Nicolas Ghesquiere, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Marc Jacobs, Clare Waight Keller as well as Sidney Toledano, Jean-Paul Claverie and I. I wish to thank them for their involvement and their support to young creation. The prize is an incredible opportunity for these young designers to be appraised by them and to enjoy their advice.”

Those in the running for the 2020 LVMH Prize include New York-based designer Peter Do, British-Indian designer Supriya Lele, British menswear designer Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, French menswear designer Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, London-based menswear designer Nicholas Daley, South African womenswear designer Sindiso Khumalo, and Japanese womenswear designer Tomotaka Koizumi of Tomo Koizumi.

The winner will take home $340,000 (£260,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months.

© Cover Media

Christelle Kocher tapped as guest designer for Pucci

Christelle Kocher is to serve as a guest designer for Italian fashion house Pucci.The French designer, who founded her label Koche in 2015, has been tapped by bosses at the LVMH-owned brand to create a collection for the upcoming fall/winter 2020 seaso…

Christelle Kocher is to serve as a guest designer for Italian fashion house Pucci.

The French designer, who founded her label Koche in 2015, has been tapped by bosses at the LVMH-owned brand to create a collection for the upcoming fall/winter 2020 season.

Kocher’s range will be presented on 20 February as part of Milan Fashion Week.

“I am very proud to collaborate with Pucci. This house has a magnificent heritage,” she said. “I have always been impressed by its elegant silhouettes, striking prints and colours. It is such a pleasure to deep dive into the brilliant history and universe of Emilio Pucci.”

Founded by Florentine designer Emilio Pucci in 1947, the company remains known for its geometric prints in a kaleidoscope of colours. But since Pucci’s death in 1992, the label has undergone many changes within the creative team, with his daughter Laudomia Pucci, and a variety of other designers, including Christian Lacroix, Matthew Williamson, and Peter Dundas, all taking on the head designer gig throughout the 2000s.

But executives at the label are now opting for a guest designer model, following in the footsteps of Moncler’s Genius concept, which has attracted the likes of Pierpaolo Piccioli and Richard Quinn.

“Pucci’s creative strategy is evolving: the Maison has decided to open its fabulous archives to ‘creative voices’, entrusting them to deliver innovative interpretations of Pucci’s heritage prints, lifestyle and collections,” a brand rep commented. “Pucci’s first collaboration will be with Christelle Kocher, a designer already spotted by LVMH on the occasion of the LVMH prize, and recognised for her unique blend of couture and street. We love her energy and are confident that her take on Pucci will be incredibly interesting and beautiful.”

The Pucci x Koche line will be available to buy in September.

© Cover Media

Gigi Hadid joins expert committee for LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers

Gigi Hadid is to help judge the upcoming LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers.The 24-year-old will work alongside 68 people from the world of fashion and media, including Italian model and influencer Chiara Ferragni, in an effort by the organisers of…

Gigi Hadid is to help judge the upcoming LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers.

The 24-year-old will work alongside 68 people from the world of fashion and media, including Italian model and influencer Chiara Ferragni, in an effort by the organisers of the competition to appeal to a younger audience.

Gigi will also serve as ambassador in March, when the semi-finalists show their collections to a panel of industry figures, according to editors at WWD.

The model joins influencers Caroline Daur and Leaf Greener, and six other newcomers, including Ibrahim Kamara, senior fashion editor at large for i-D magazine, Natalie Kingham from Matches fashion, and Moda Operandi co-founder Lauren Santo Domingo.

Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, thanked the new additions for the “commitment” to the prestigious fashion prize.

“They are witnesses and essential actors of fashion. Their vision helps to discover the most promising talents. I would like to thank them warmly for their loyalty and commitment to our cause,” she said in a statement.

The winner will be decided by a jury comprised of designers from top LVMH fashion houses such as Marc Jacobs, Fendi, Christian Dior, and Givenchy.

The prize is open to designers under the age of 40 who have presented and sold at least two collections of women’s, men’s or unisex ready-to-wear.

A cash prize of $330,000 (£254,000), plus a year of coaching from experts, is up for grabs.

© Cover Media

LVMH reaches deal to buy Tiffany & Co. for $16.2 billion

Executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have made a deal to buy Tiffany & Co. for $16.2 billion (£12.5 billion).Back in October, leaders at the world’s biggest high-end goods conglomerate, headed by French billionaire Bernard Arnault, announc…

Executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have made a deal to buy Tiffany & Co. for $16.2 billion (£12.5 billion).

Back in October, leaders at the world’s biggest high-end goods conglomerate, headed by French billionaire Bernard Arnault, announced they had approached bosses at the U.S. jewellery brand with a possible takeover bid.

But after a month of talks, representatives announced on Monday that the companies had entered into an agreement where LVMH will acquire Tiffany for $135 (£104) per share in cash, with the equity value of the transaction equating to $16.2 billion.

“We are delighted to have the opportunity to welcome Tiffany, a company with an unparalleled heritage and unique position in the global jewellery world, to the LVMH family,” Arnault, chairman and chief executive officer of LVMH, commented. “We have an immense respect and admiration for Tiffany and intend to develop this jewel with the same dedication and commitment that we have applied to each and every one of our maisons. We will be proud to have Tiffany sit alongside our iconic brands and look forward to ensuring that Tiffany continues to thrive for centuries to come.”

In addition to owning Louis Vuitton, LVMH is the parent company of watch and jewellery brands including Bulgari, Chaumet, Hublot, TAG Heuer, and Zenith.

Roger N. Farah, chairman of the board of directors of Tiffany, stated that the deal is expected to close in mid-2020. The transaction is subject to closing conditions, including approval from Tiffany’s shareholders and the receipt of regulatory approvals.

“Following a strategic review that included a thoughtful internal process and expert external advice, the board has concluded that this transaction with LVMH provides an exciting path forward with a group that appreciates and will invest in Tiffany’s unique assets and strong human capital, while delivering a compelling price with value certainty to our shareholders,” he said.

Founded in 1837 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, Tiffany has since become synonymous with timeless design and the iconic Tiffany Blue boxes.

© Cover Media

Stella McCartney: ‘I don’t want anyone to sacrifice style for sustainability’

Stella McCartney doesn’t want any consumer to sacrifice their sense of style for the sake of sustainability. The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the fashion industry, with her using eco-friendly and cruelty-f…

Stella McCartney doesn’t want any consumer to sacrifice their sense of style for the sake of sustainability.

The British designer has been a trailblazer when it comes to sustainability in the fashion industry, with her using eco-friendly and cruelty-free materials to create the outfits for her eponymous label.

However, in an interview with WWD, McCartney insisted that sustainable practices should not come at the expense of strong fashion.

“I don’t want anyone to sacrifice their style for sustainability,” she said. “I think that 90 per cent of the world looking at Stella McCartney has no idea that I’m a sustainable house or that my handbags are not made out of leather or I’m not using real fur or animal glues or PVC. They are (elements) that shouldn’t be seen to the consumer. These are things that I should practice as a better way of doing business.”

Earlier this year, McCartney signed a deal with French fashion conglomerate Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) and was recently appointed as a special adviser on sustainability to LVMH chairman and chief executive officer Bernard Arnault.

She hopes that she can introduce some of her brand’s ethics to other LVMH companies, such as Dior, Fendi, and Givenchy.

“We all know that the fashion industry is a slow process and it takes a good year or year-and-a-half for what we’re doing today to even come into the marketplace,” the 48-year-old explained. “So, if we don’t do it now, we could be in danger of being left behind or not being in fashion at all or being irrelevant. And not really delivering on what the youth desire from us and come to us for, which is being ahead and being the future.”

© Cover Media

LVMH confirms $14.5 billion Tiffany & Co. takeover talks

Bosses at luxury goods group Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have confirmed they have made an offer of $14.5 billion to buy Tiffany & Co.Leaders at the world’s biggest high-end good conglomerate, headed by French billionaire Bernard Arnault, announc…

Bosses at luxury goods group Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have confirmed they have made an offer of $14.5 billion to buy Tiffany & Co.

Leaders at the world’s biggest high-end good conglomerate, headed by French billionaire Bernard Arnault, announced on Monday that they had approached executives at the American jewellery brand with a possible takeover bid.

“In light of recent market rumours, LVMH Group confirms it has held preliminary discussions regarding a possible transaction with Tiffany,” the company said in a statement. “There can be no assurance that these discussions will result in any agreement.”

If it goes through, it would be the group’s biggest purchase to date. It would also give the French company its first major non-fashion U.S. brand, according to editors at WWD.

In light of the proposal, a Tiffany spokesperson commented, “Tiffany & Co. today confirmed it has received an unsolicited, non-binding proposal from LMVH to acquire Tiffany for $120 per share in cash. While the parties are not in discussions, Tiffany’s board of directors, consistent with its fiduciary responsibilities, is carefully reviewing the proposal, with the assistance of independent financial and legal advisors, to determine the course of action it believes is in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders. Tiffany shareholders need take no action at this time.”

LVMH already owns luxury jewellery label Bulgari, which it bought in 2011 for $5.2 billion (£4 billion), along with Chaumet, Fred and watch brands Tag Heuer, Hublot, and Zenith.

Tiffany & Co., which is famous for its baby blue boxes and extravagant diamonds, was founded in 1837 by 25-year-old Charles Lewis Tiffany and his friend John B. Young.

LVMH also oversees luxury fashion labels including Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior, Givenchy, Marc Jacobs, and Fendi.

© Cover Media

Rihanna ‘proud’ to model Fenty designs on cover of U.S. Vogue

Rihanna was “proud” to wear designs from her Fenty line in a new photoshoot for U.S. Vogue.The superstar appears on the November 2019 cover of the fashion publication and is seen posing in a beige jacket from her clothing brand, which she co-founded wi…

Rihanna was “proud” to wear designs from her Fenty line in a new photoshoot for U.S. Vogue.

The superstar appears on the November 2019 cover of the fashion publication and is seen posing in a beige jacket from her clothing brand, which she co-founded with bosses at luxury group LVMH in May.

Rihanna took to Instagram on Wednesday to upload a picture of the cover and noted that she was excited to be able to pose in items she had designed.

“So proud to be on another cover of @voguemagazine wearing my own designs from @fenty !!! On stands October 16th!” she wrote.

Rihanna was photographed by Ethan James Green, while Yusef Williams was in charge of her hair and Kanako Takase tasked with her make-up.

In the accompanying interview, the singer spoke about the development of her own fashion house over the past year or so and acknowledged that she was surprised when LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault first reached out.

“I just thought, ‘Really? Is he sure? Like, now?'” the 31-year-old recalled. “And then you’re left with this opportunity that’s a really big risk for everyone involved. But I’ve never been afraid to take risks. That’s the thing that got me out of my own way. I was like, ‘You’ve never been afraid to do anything or try anything, regardless of the outcome.’ So I accepted, and we went full steam ahead.”

Since launching Fenty, Rihanna has won praise for her wearable garments and direct-to-consumer business model. And she’s determined to continue taking a hands-on approach to her clothing venture.

“I’m not the face of my brand, but I am the muse, and my DNA has to run all the way through it,” she insisted. “I don’t want anyone to pull up my website and think, Rihanna would never wear that.”

© Cover Media