Amina Muaddi on Fenty collaboration: ‘Rihanna’s not scared of risks’

Amina Muaddi was impressed with Rihanna’s work ethic as they joined forces for their upcoming Fenty footwear collaboration.The coveted shoe designer, who has celebrity fans including Kim Kardashian, Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid, has tea…

Amina Muaddi was impressed with Rihanna’s work ethic as they joined forces for their upcoming Fenty footwear collaboration.

The coveted shoe designer, who has celebrity fans including Kim Kardashian, Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner and Gigi Hadid, has teamed up with the Grammy-winning singer on a collection for her LVMH fashion house, Fenty.

Rihanna was already a huge fan of Amina’s shoes, which feature a unique kick-flare heel, and she revealed it was an “organic” collaboration, which began when Fenty’s deputy creative director Jahleel Weaver brought her onboard.

“Rihanna’s so warm and open to ideas – that’s what struck me the most. She’s up for trying things and not scared of risks. Ri tries the products on and tests them on herself – it’s cool to see that she cares how she feels when wearing them,” Amina told British Vogue.

“I obviously love Rihanna for both her music and her talent, (but also) for her iconic style. I have a lot of admiration for her. Ri was always wearing my shoes and I was wearing Fenty. So we were supporting each other; we have mutual respect for each other’s work. When Jahleel asked me if I wanted to be part of their project, of course, I said yes.”

Amina has fond memories of working with the Umbrella hitmaker, and her right-hand man Jahleel, while creating the hotly-anticipated capsule collection.

She also redesigned her signature heel for the Fenty collaboration, and was inspired by an industrial, rather than feminine, aesthetic instead.

“I wanted to make something completely different – four styles that I felt would be easy to wear and reflect the Fenty DNA, but would also be strong and unique. This time I had this industrial feel in my head, and columns and buildings,” she shared.

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LVMH launches Fund in Aid of Young Fashion Designers

LVMH is inviting previous Prize for Young Designers winners to apply for additional funding from the fashion conglomerate.The annual prizegiving usually sees one young designer scooping a top prize of $336,000 (£270,000) and a year-long mentorship fro…

LVMH is inviting previous Prize for Young Designers winners to apply for additional funding from the fashion conglomerate.

The annual prizegiving usually sees one young designer scooping a top prize of $336,000 (£270,000) and a year-long mentorship from LVHM, while the runner-up takes home the $168,000 (£135,000) Karl Lagerfeld Prize.

In April, the company revealed it was cancelling the final of the 2020 prize in light of Covid-19, deciding to instead share the prize money between all eight finalists, giving them $45,000 (£36,000) each.

Now, it has been revealed that the money from the Karl Lagerfeld Prize will go towards the Fund in Aid of Young Fashion Designers, which will be supplemented by additional prize budget money.

A total of 13 previous winners of both the main award and runners-up prizes will benefit from the help, upon application.

“Each fund request will be examined by the LVMH Prize team and appraised according to the situation, the difficulties encountered and the specific needs of each brand in the wake of Covid-19,” LVMH representatives said in a statement on Friday.

Executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, Delphine Arnault, who launched the prize in 2013, further elaborated on the new fund.

“In these challenging times, the mission of the LVMH Prize in support of young talent is more critical than ever. The Fund in Aid of Young Fashion Designers allows the winners to temporarily benefit from essential help in order to sustain their creativity and their brands,” Arnault said.

Previous winners include Grace Wales Bonner, Marques’Almeida, and Thomas Tait.

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Louis Vuitton making face masks and hospital gowns amid coronavirus crisis

Louis Vuitton has reopened one of its ateliers to begin making face masks and hospital gowns amid the coronavirus crisis.In light of the Covid-19 pandemic around the world, bosses at the French luxury fashion house have announced that they have altered…

Louis Vuitton has reopened one of its ateliers to begin making face masks and hospital gowns amid the coronavirus crisis.

In light of the Covid-19 pandemic around the world, bosses at the French luxury fashion house have announced that they have altered workshops so they can now manufacture personal protective equipment (PPE) for hospitals and frontline workers.

“Louis Vuitton announces the production of thousands of hospital gowns to be donated to frontline medical staff within the Parisian hospital network AP-HP,” a brand spokesperson commented, referring to Assistance Publique – Hopitaux de Paris hospital trust. “These gowns will be created by volunteers at the Maison’s headquarters for six Parisian hospitals in urgent need of protective gear. Thank you to everyone who is doing their part to fight this global pandemic.”

In addition, Louis Vuitton has begun producing non-medical masks approved by authorities at six of its workshops. Around 300 leather goods artisans are working to meet a government request for alternative non-medical barrier masks to help stop the spread of the virus.

“In partnership with the Mode Grande Ouest textile network, this initiative will donate the much-needed protective gear to frontline healthcare workers. Thank you to the hundreds of artisans who have volunteered to create these masks, as well as everyone doing their part to fight this global pandemic,” they added.

In addition, other houses within the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) conglomerate are also undertaking actions to help aid health workers.

The perfumes and cosmetics production sites of Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy have been retooled so they can make large quantities of hand sanitiser gel for hospitals, while volunteer staff at the Dior workshop in Redon, Brittany are making non-surgical face masks.

Europe is now the epicentre of the pandemic, with France among the most affected nations – with approximately 94,000 active cases and 14,900 deaths.

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Dior begins manufacturing face masks amid coronavirus crisis

Dior is now producing face masks for frontline health workers amid the coronavirus crisis.Executives at the French luxury label announced on Tuesday that they have reopened the Baby Dior factory in Redon, Brittany in order to begin manufacturing the no…

Dior is now producing face masks for frontline health workers amid the coronavirus crisis.

Executives at the French luxury label announced on Tuesday that they have reopened the Baby Dior factory in Redon, Brittany in order to begin manufacturing the non-surgical hospital gear.

“We are proud to reopen our @BabyDior_official ateliers in Redon, which since yesterday have begun the continuous production of new masks on a volunteer basis,” a representative wrote in an Instagram post. “Dior is actively committed to aiding and protecting all those who are on the front line every day. Thank you to our wonderful petites mains (artisans) who, in an exceptional show of solidarity, are working tirelessly to protect (healthcare workers).”

The initiative follows a call from French President Emmanuel Macron for the production of facemasks to be accelerated. The country, which has had an estimated 52,000 reported cases of Covid-19, needs 10 million masks per week by the end of April, triple its usual capacity.

Accordingly, the Dior spokesperson went on to thank the team in the atelier for all of their hard work.

“We will return more creative than ever to continue making you dream. But for the time being our petites mains have voluntarily undertaken to produce masks for those invaluable people working selflessly on the front lines,” they added. “We proudly salute this gesture which once again shows the generosity of our ateliers and laboratories, more committed than ever to ensuring your protection. Take care of yourself, we are by your side.”

Part of the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) conglomerate, Dior is one of a growing number of high-end brands that have retooled factories and workforces to address the shortfall in vital medical equipment.

Previously, bosses at LVMH announced that they were levering supply chains so they could deliver millions of masks to France from an industrial supplier in China and would also be making and distributing large quantities of hydroalcoholic gel.

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Anna Wintour cried over Ralph Lauren’s $10 million coronavirus donation

Anna Wintour cried when she heard that Ralph Lauren had donated $10 million (£8.1 million) to aid the battle against the coronavirus.In an op-ed for Vogue.com, the editor-in-chief opened up about the fashion industry’s response to the global pandemic,…

Anna Wintour cried when she heard that Ralph Lauren had donated $10 million (£8.1 million) to aid the battle against the coronavirus.

In an op-ed for Vogue.com, the editor-in-chief opened up about the fashion industry’s response to the global pandemic, which has so far infected more than 801,000 people, with almost 38,700 deaths, since the outbreak began in December.

Wintour shared her joy about the American designer’s generous donation, which was made via his foundation. The donation was spread across a range of organisations, including the World Health Organization’s Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund and the Council of Fashion Designers of America/Vogue Fashion Fund, which helps struggling designers during the crisis.

“Positivity is such a precious commodity right now, but I felt something close to pure joy in recent days,” Wintour wrote. “My emotions, like yours I’m sure, are fairly close to the surface, but I’m not afraid to admit that I broke down on the phone with Ralph when he called to give me the incredible news about his gift.”

The 70-year-old was overjoyed to see the likes of fashion conglomerates Moet Hennessy – Louis Vuitton (LVMH) and Kering rally round to support emergency workers on the frontlines in hospitals, as well as designers such as Miuccia Prada and Donatella Versace make personal donations to hard-hit hospitals.

“American fashion and beauty companies have been mobilising too, making masks, gowns and hand sanitiser. I have never been more proud of our industry,” she wrote.

She concluded her touching op-ed with a reminder that the pandemic will soon pass.

“There is so much loss and sadness now, but I keep hearing from friends and family members by phone and FaceTime and I know these weeks of isolation are reminding us how important our human connections are,” Wintour shared. “It will be impossible to take those connections for granted once this is behind us.”

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H&M to supply protective equipment for hospitals during coronavirus crisis

H&M is to begin making protective equipment for hospital workers amid the coronavirus crisis.In light of the escalating Covid-19 pandemic around the world, executives at the Swedish high street retailer have announced that they are quickly rearranging …

H&M is to begin making protective equipment for hospital workers amid the coronavirus crisis.

In light of the escalating Covid-19 pandemic around the world, executives at the Swedish high street retailer have announced that they are quickly rearranging their supply chain in order to start manufacturing personal protective equipment (PPE) for hospitals and healthcare workers.

“The coronavirus is dramatically affecting each and every one of us, and H&M Group is, like many other organisations, trying our best to help in this extraordinary situation,” commented Anna Gedda, head of sustainability at H&M Group. “We see this is as a first step in our efforts to support in any way we can. We are all in this together, and have to approach this as collectively as possible.”

Gedda hopes to start delivering as soon as possible. At present, approximately two-thirds of H&M’s stores around the globe have closed in response to government measures enacted to help slow down the spread of the virus. Customers can still shop online in 50 markets.

Elsewhere, executives at other major conglomerates are doing their part to aid hospital workers too, with leaders at Kering and Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) unveiling plans to supply millions of masks to people in France.

While top fashion designers, such as Prabal Gurung, Christian Siriano, and Brandon Maxwell, are also looking at converting their workshops so they can make medical masks and other PPE for hospital staff in New York.

Since the coronavirus outbreak started in Wuhan, China last December, there have been approximately 424,000 confirmed cases and an estimated 18,900 deaths.

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Saint Laurent and Balenciaga workshops to begin making medical masks

Employees at Saint Laurent and Balenciaga’s workshops will soon begin making medical masks.In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis around the world, bosses at Kering, the parent company of the luxury fashion houses, announced on Sunday that they …

Employees at Saint Laurent and Balenciaga’s workshops will soon begin making medical masks.

In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis around the world, bosses at Kering, the parent company of the luxury fashion houses, announced on Sunday that they are preparing to transform textile plants so they can start manufacturing surgical masks for hospitals in order to help support local health authorities.

“The French workshops of Kering’s Houses Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent are preparing to manufacture masks while complying with the strictest health protection measures for their staff members, with production getting underway as soon as the manufacturing process and materials have been approved by the relevant authorities,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

Leaders at Kering, the conglomerate helmed by Francois-Henri Pinault, have already provided the French health service with three million masks, following on from contributions made to China and Italy in recent weeks.

They are also making a financial donation to the Institut Pasteur in Paris to aid scientists in researching the Covid-19 pandemic.

Meanwhile, bosses at Kering’s main competitor Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have also pledged to supply millions of surgical masks to workers in France.

“By virtue of its global distribution network, LVMH has managed to secure an order with a Chinese industrial supplier for a delivery of 10 million masks in France in the coming days (seven million surgical masks and three million FFP2 masks). The order will be repeated for at least four weeks in similar quantities (i.e. approximately 40 million masks),” a spokesperson commented.

Last week, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault instructed the staff at LVMH Perfumes & Cosmetics, including those who make products for Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy, to prepare sites to begin making “substantial quantities” of hydroalcoholic gel.

The gel will be delivered free of charge to French health authorities and those working at Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, a network of teaching hospitals that treats more than eight million patients per year.

At present, there have been over 351,000 reported coronavirus cases around the world, with 15,000 deaths. China, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Iran, and the U.S. remain the worst affected nations.

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LVMH to make hand sanitiser for hospitals amid coronavirus crisis

Employees at perfume factories owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) are to begin manufacturing hand sanitiser for hospitals.In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis in France and around the world, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault has in…

Employees at perfume factories owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) are to begin manufacturing hand sanitiser for hospitals.

In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis in France and around the world, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault has instructed bosses at LVMH Perfumes & Cosmetics, including those who make products for Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy, to prepare sites to begin making “substantial quantities” of hydroalcoholic gel.

The gel will be delivered free of charge to French health authorities and those working at Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, a network of teaching hospitals that treats more than eight million patients per year.

“Through this initiative, LVMH intends to help address the risk of a lack of product in France and enable a greater number of people to continue to take the right action to protect themselves from the spread of the virus,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “LVMH will continue to honour this commitment for as long as necessary, in connection with the French health authorities.”

More than 170,000 people have been affected in 158 countries since the Covid-19 outbreak began in Wuhan, China back in December. Italy, Spain, and some parts of the U.S. have gone into lockdown to contain the spread of the virus, as more than 6,600 people have died.

In France, leaders have introduced sweeping restrictions across the nation, with cafes, restaurants, cinemas, and many non-essential stores now closed, while pharmacies have restricted customers to one bottle of sanitiser per person.

There has been over 5,400 coronavirus cases reported in the country, with 127 deaths.

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Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh join 2020 LVMH Prize jury

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers …

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Tuesday, organisers announced that this year’s winner will be announced at an event held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris on 5 June, with McCartney and Louis Vuitton menswear designer Abloh among the panel.

Singer Rihanna, who launched her Fenty clothing label in partnership with the luxury conglomerate last year, will also be on the jury.

“For this seventh edition, I am delighted to announce the arrival of Virgil Abloh, former Prize finalist, Robyn Rihanna Fenty, and Stella McCartney in the jury of the LVMH Prize,” said Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, in a statement. “They will be joining our prestigious panel which includes: Jonathan Anderson, Kris Van Assche, Nicolas Ghesquiere, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Marc Jacobs, Clare Waight Keller as well as Sidney Toledano, Jean-Paul Claverie and I. I wish to thank them for their involvement and their support to young creation. The prize is an incredible opportunity for these young designers to be appraised by them and to enjoy their advice.”

Those in the running for the 2020 LVMH Prize include New York-based designer Peter Do, British-Indian designer Supriya Lele, British menswear designer Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, French menswear designer Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, London-based menswear designer Nicholas Daley, South African womenswear designer Sindiso Khumalo, and Japanese womenswear designer Tomotaka Koizumi of Tomo Koizumi.

The winner will take home $340,000 (£260,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months.

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Christelle Kocher tapped as guest designer for Pucci

Christelle Kocher is to serve as a guest designer for Italian fashion house Pucci.The French designer, who founded her label Koche in 2015, has been tapped by bosses at the LVMH-owned brand to create a collection for the upcoming fall/winter 2020 seaso…

Christelle Kocher is to serve as a guest designer for Italian fashion house Pucci.

The French designer, who founded her label Koche in 2015, has been tapped by bosses at the LVMH-owned brand to create a collection for the upcoming fall/winter 2020 season.

Kocher’s range will be presented on 20 February as part of Milan Fashion Week.

“I am very proud to collaborate with Pucci. This house has a magnificent heritage,” she said. “I have always been impressed by its elegant silhouettes, striking prints and colours. It is such a pleasure to deep dive into the brilliant history and universe of Emilio Pucci.”

Founded by Florentine designer Emilio Pucci in 1947, the company remains known for its geometric prints in a kaleidoscope of colours. But since Pucci’s death in 1992, the label has undergone many changes within the creative team, with his daughter Laudomia Pucci, and a variety of other designers, including Christian Lacroix, Matthew Williamson, and Peter Dundas, all taking on the head designer gig throughout the 2000s.

But executives at the label are now opting for a guest designer model, following in the footsteps of Moncler’s Genius concept, which has attracted the likes of Pierpaolo Piccioli and Richard Quinn.

“Pucci’s creative strategy is evolving: the Maison has decided to open its fabulous archives to ‘creative voices’, entrusting them to deliver innovative interpretations of Pucci’s heritage prints, lifestyle and collections,” a brand rep commented. “Pucci’s first collaboration will be with Christelle Kocher, a designer already spotted by LVMH on the occasion of the LVMH prize, and recognised for her unique blend of couture and street. We love her energy and are confident that her take on Pucci will be incredibly interesting and beautiful.”

The Pucci x Koche line will be available to buy in September.

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