Dior incites call for female solidarity with fall 20 collection

Dior has incited a call for female solidarity with its latest fashion collection.Creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri unveiled her fall/winter 2020 line at the Jardin des Tuileries as part of Paris Fashion Week on Tuesday, with the presentation attrac…

Dior has incited a call for female solidarity with its latest fashion collection.

Creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri unveiled her fall/winter 2020 line at the Jardin des Tuileries as part of Paris Fashion Week on Tuesday, with the presentation attracting celebrities such as Sigourney Weaver, Andie MacDowell, Cara Delevingne, Demi Moore, Nina Dobrev, Rachel Brosnahan, Karlie Kloss, and Alexa Chung.

The entrance to the space was decorated with a sign featuring the ambiguous phrase “I Say I”, a reference to the work of collective feminist artist Claire Fontaine as well as the introduction to the manifesto of art critic-turned-feminist activist Carla Lonzi. In addition, illuminated signs with slogans such as “Consent,” “Women’s Love is Unpaid Labour,” “Women are the Moon that Moves the Tides,” and “Patriarchy Kills Love,” were installed in the venue.

“They are the symbol of a joyful singularity, as well as a creative and collective way of approaching the multiple aspects of feminine subjectivity – and the infinite project that femininity represents,” a Dior representative explained of the concept.

To begin, the spectacle kicked off with model Ruth Bell walking the runway in a black suit, white shirt, black tie, fishnet tights, and Mary Jane-style flats.

A number of black outfits followed, with the looks toughened up via the addition of bandanas, tights, and combat boots. Elsewhere, a ’70s vibe was evident in long, embroidered dresses, miniskirts, and pleats and fringe detailing, while Chiuri also drew upon former creative director Marc Bohan’s use of check fabric in his designs during his 30-year-old stint at the French house, as well as founder Christian Dior’s love of the fabric.

To conclude, the designer offered up a selection of chic separates, with highlights including striped metallic gowns, Grecian-inspired dresses with finely pleated skirts and drapery, as well as relaxed takes on classic menswear tailoring and suits.

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Grace Kelly’s wardrobe to go on display at Christian Dior Museum

Grace Kelly’s wardrobe is set to go on display at the Christian Dior Museum, located in the designer’s family home in Granville, Normandy.Opening on 27 April (19), the Grace of Monaco, Princess in Dior exhibition will feature more than 85 dresses fro…

Grace Kelly’s wardrobe is set to go on display at the Christian Dior Museum, located in the designer’s family home in Granville, Normandy.

Opening on 27 April (19), the Grace of Monaco, Princess in Dior exhibition will feature more than 85 dresses from Kelly’s personal wardrobe, as part of a showcase dedicated to her close relationship to the house of Dior.

The Hollywood icon famously chose to wear Christian Dior as she entered into Monegasque royalty, following her marriage to Prince Rainier III in 1956.

She had previously appeared in a Dior gown at her engagement ball earlier that year, and wore a haute couture creation from Christian Dior’s fall 1956 collection in her first official portrait as Princess Grace of Monaco.

Fashion historian Florence Muller, who also curated the exhibition, was allowed unprecedented access into the Monaco Palace’s archives, and revealed that one-third of the Rear Window star’s covetable wardrobe was Dior garments.

“Grace Kelly’s relationship with the maison Dior reveals the central place the house occupied in fashion at the time,” she reflected. “(Creative director) Marc Bohan perfectly understood her role: she needed to be stylish, but respectful of etiquette.”

The exhibition will showcase a selection of the star’s publicly-worn haute couture dresses, alongside a private wardrobe of shirtdresses, tweed suits and clean-cut blouses.

Muller went on to consider the blend of public and private that the actress-turned-royal represents, and insisted that she was the first royal of her kind to be so accessible to the public.

“Before Grace of Monaco, royalty remained a private affair: princesses weren’t seen in public as much, or photographed by the press,” she explained. “She represents a moment of change of etiquette, a real rupture.”

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Maria Grazia Chiuri has brought back Dior’s Oblique bag

Maria Grazia Chiuri has reinvented Christian Dior’s Oblique canvas bag.As well as the fashion house bringing back its famous Saddle bag, the French label has also re-established the Oblique, which was designed by Marc Bohan in 1967.Talking to Vogue U.K…

Maria Grazia Chiuri has reinvented Christian Dior’s Oblique canvas bag.

As well as the fashion house bringing back its famous Saddle bag, the French label has also re-established the Oblique, which was designed by Marc Bohan in 1967.

Talking to Vogue U.K. about the design, Chiuri explained why she’s such a fan.

“It’s the perfect graphic. It contains both logo and texture, both irony and seriousness, together in one. It is traditional, but at the same time has a pop sensibility,” she smiled.

To celebrate the launch, luxury London store Harrods has an Oblique canvas pop-up shop throughout August (18), and has given one if its windows a Dior makeover.

An exclusive range of Saddle, Miss Dior and CD Hobo bags will also be available.

Asked for her favourite item from the collection, artistic director Chiuri picked the book tote.

“It bests reflects me,” she shared. “I designed it in order to be able to hold the objects I value, like books. It’s made using a technique that combines heritage with innovation, and the way the Oblique is constructed means that the bag can be customised. It becomes an object that represents the person carrying it.”

The Italian fashion star also opened up about designing accessories alongside Dior’s clothing collections.

“An essential part of my professional path is down to accessories… there’s a perpetual challenge of finding a balance between heritage and innovation. But when I work on accessories, I feel free to experiment in design,” she said.

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