Cindy Crawford was pressured into posing nude by photographer

Cindy Crawford regrets once allowing a photographer pressure her into posing nude.The supermodel made the startling confession during a joint interview with her daughter Kaia Gerber at Vogue’s Forces of Fashion conference on Thursday, as the pair began…

Cindy Crawford regrets once allowing a photographer pressure her into posing nude.

The supermodel made the startling confession during a joint interview with her daughter Kaia Gerber at Vogue’s Forces of Fashion conference on Thursday, as the pair began to discuss how the #MeToo movement has affected the fashion industry.

While the 53-year-old has willingly posed nude for the likes of late photography icons Herb Ritts and Helmut Newton, she shared one incident in which she was put under pressure to go nude during the shoot.

“I’ve done a tonne of nudes throughout my career, but I never ever felt bad about (it) except for one time. And it was because it wasn’t supposed to be a nude and I kind of felt like a little pressured into it,” Cindy explained.

She gave no further details about the photographer, or when the distressing incident took place, but insisted it didn’t happen when she was under the age of 18.

“I, even as a woman of 53, want to feel respected and protected in any work environment I’m in. But that one time with that guy, it just felt not right. Those are the only ones I regret. They actually are not even full nudes; they were from the back, sort of. But I didn’t vote myself in,” she continued. “Sometimes they don’t like when you say no, but now I think models feel more empowered to say ‘no’.”

Elsewhere in the interview, Kaia opened up about the challenges she faces as the daughter of one of the world’s most famous women.

“I came from an already known family so it was easy for people to have preconceived ideas about me,” the 18-year-old reflected. “The biggest struggle was proving people wrong. I almost had to go backwards before I went forward.”

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Geena Davis recalls ‘very uncomfortable’ encounter with male director

Geena Davis has recalled a “very uncomfortable” encounter with a male director early on in her career.The Thelma & Louise star said she had a “million examples” of sexual harassment in an interview with USA Today, and opened up about an incident in whi…

Geena Davis has recalled a “very uncomfortable” encounter with a male director early on in her career.

The Thelma & Louise star said she had a “million examples” of sexual harassment in an interview with USA Today, and opened up about an incident in which the unnamed filmmaker asked her to act out a “sexy scene” while sitting on his lap.

“I was auditioning for a part where in one scene, my character was going to be sitting on the lap of the male character. The director said, ‘Just act the scene out with me,’ and made me sit on his lap. It was kind of a sexy scene,” Davis explained. “I didn’t want to do it, and I was very uncomfortable, but I didn’t know you could say no.”

The 63-year-old also sadly reflected on the #MeToo movement in Hollywood and told the publication that actresses are still victims of sexual misconduct.

“Hopefully in the time of #MeToo and Time’s Up, women aren’t going to have to suffer through that,” Davis shared. “It’s pretty standard that you don’t meet alone with a man in a private room or hotel suite anymore, but plenty of that stuff goes on and has gone on for a long time.”

The Oscar-winning actress is currently starring in the third season of Netflix’s wrestling drama GLOW, in which she plays hotel manager Sandy Devereaux St. Clair.

And the veteran actress was inspired by the bond she developed up with her female co-stars, including Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin, and Kate Nash.

“There’s definitely a different vibe when it’s mostly women. I always say men don’t know what we’re like when we’re alone,” Davis said. “It’s really, really true. We have a special way of relating with each other, and that’s very inspiring.”

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Natalie Portman: ‘There’s a revolution occurring in beauty industry’

Natalie Portman is adamant make-up can play a part in the female-led revolution occurring in Hollywood.The Oscar-winning actress is a staunch political activist and has been involved in the U.S. Women’s March equal rights organisation and the developme…

Natalie Portman is adamant make-up can play a part in the female-led revolution occurring in Hollywood.

The Oscar-winning actress is a staunch political activist and has been involved in the U.S. Women’s March equal rights organisation and the development of the #MeToo movement.

And in a new interview with Marie Claire, Portman explained how she feels cosmetics and a woman’s beauty can be revolutionary.

“I think everyone now feels free to use beauty products as much or as little as they want, and the relaxing of those constraints is a revolution in itself,” she shared. “It allows you to reveal who you are but also to protect by masking yourself. Sometimes you want a bold lipstick, and sometimes no make-up at all. No matter what you decide, it doesn’t dictate who you are.”

The Black Swan star is keen to use as many natural products as possible in her beauty routine, after being inspired by the make-up artist on the set of her first film Leon: The Professional back in 1994.

“For my first role, the make-up artist on set used beet juice mixed with rose water for my character’s cheeks, and it always made me want to use the most natural products possible,” the 38-year-old shared.

The actress, who is the face of Dior’s hugely successful fragrance Miss Dior, also revealed that one of her favourite scents is jasmine, as it transports her back to Morocco where she travelled extensively during her twenties.

“Smell is the most emotional of the senses. It’s one of the earliest to develop, so scents hit you at your core and can take you back to a particular place and time,” Portman explained.

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Disney deletes Toy Story 2 ‘casting couch’ joke

Officials at Disney have made the decision to remove a casting couch gag from the closing credits of Toy Story 2, in light of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements.The Disney Pixar classic was released on 4K Blu-ray earlier this year, and viewers have not…

Officials at Disney have made the decision to remove a casting couch gag from the closing credits of Toy Story 2, in light of the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements.

The Disney Pixar classic was released on 4K Blu-ray earlier this year, and viewers have noticed that the outtake-style scene has been wiped from the movie’s credits on the new edition.

The scene shows leading character Woody (Tom Hanks) observing Stinky Pete the Prospector (Kelsey Grammer), sleazily stroking two Barbies’ hands and suggesting he could help their careers.

“So you two are absolutely identical? You know, I’m sure I could get you a part in Toy Story 3…” he told the characters, before denying any wrongdoing upon being caught, adding, “Alright girls, lovely talking with you, any time you’d like some tips on acting, I’d be glad to chat with you.”

The release does, however, include other scenes from the original edit, including popular characters messing up their lines, as well as special behind the scenes features. And fans have speculated the move has come as a result of several similar, real-life cases of movie stars being coerced into offering sex in exchange for roles in “casting couch” scenarios.

The #MeToo and Time’s Up movements gained prominence following the allegations, including those involving studio boss Harvey Weinstein who is facing criminal charges for sexual assault. He has denied all allegations.

Pixar Animation Studios co-founder and Walt Disney Company animation chief John Lasseter also stepped down from his post in 2018 amid allegations of sexual misconduct towards employees.

In a memo issued to staff, he described the misconduct as “missteps” and “deeply apologised” for any untoward gestures.

“No matter how benign my intent, everyone has the right to set their own boundaries and have them respected,” he added.

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Tom Ford defends Terry Richardson over sexual assault allegations

Tom Ford has defended photographer Terry Richardson over sexual assault accusations.The designer, who served stints as creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent before launching his eponymous fashion and beauty brand in 2006, has had a long pro…

Tom Ford has defended photographer Terry Richardson over sexual assault accusations.

The designer, who served stints as creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent before launching his eponymous fashion and beauty brand in 2006, has had a long professional partnership with the controversial snapper.

Richardson has been accused by multiple models of sexually assaulting or exploiting them during photoshoots, allegations he has denied, and in a new interview with The New York Times, Ford commented that he had never witnessed any negative behaviour.

“Ugh! I love Terry,” he stated. “And I have to say that I never in my entire life saw any of that with Terry. One of my assistants went out with Terry for two years and he was the kindest, gentlest person in the relationship.”

Richardson was banned by several fashion houses and publisher Conde Nast in light of the #MeToo movement in 2017 and is currently under investigation by New York police officers in relation to multiple sexual assault allegations.

In the wide-ranging chat with the publication, Ford also discussed his Oscar-nominated movies A Single Man and Nocturnal Animals, why he abides by a vegan diet, and his decision to give up drinking alcohol a decade ago.

“I was at an afternoon party at a friend’s house, and (actor) Martin Short said to me, ‘Do you think you might have a drinking problem?'” the 57-year-old recalled. “Because it was lunch and I was just kicking back the vodka tonics and I didn’t think anything of it. It was the first indication I had that, ‘Oh, maybe this isn’t normal.'”

Ford met with a therapist to discuss his drinking habits for a year and eventually decided to give up altogether.

Elsewhere, the fashion star also remembered the time he was nude on a beach in St. Barts when U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour walked by.

“It was a wake-up call,” he shared.

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Gisele Bundchen certain #MeToo movement will ‘unite’ women

Gisele Bundchen is certain the #MeToo movement has the power to “unite” women around the globe.The Brazilian supermodel retired from runway modelling back in 2015 but continues to appear in editorials and campaigns and also released her book Lessons: M…

Gisele Bundchen is certain the #MeToo movement has the power to “unite” women around the globe.

The Brazilian supermodel retired from runway modelling back in 2015 but continues to appear in editorials and campaigns and also released her book Lessons: My Path to a Meaningful Life last year (18).

In her story, Gisele opened up about her experiences in the competitive fashion industry, however, she is hoping that models will soon become much more supportive of one another, especially in light of the #MeToo movement fighting sexual harassment and assault which is sweeping the entertainment industry.

“I come from a family of six strong, beautiful women. The way I grew up, we always supported each other, we helped each other, we loved each other. But when I left home, that’s not what I felt with the other models. I did not understand why anyone would not want the best for me, when I wanted the best for everybody,” she said in an interview with Porter magazine. “This #MeToo movement has united women. It’s a beautiful thing. We are stronger when we are together… It makes me wonder why we weren’t being like this before.”

In her book, Gisele opened up on a wide range of topics, including her struggles with anxiety, her former relationships, such as with actor Leonardo DiCaprio, and how she met her husband, American football quarterback Tom Brady, whose team the New England Patriots won the Super Bowl for the sixth time on Sunday (03Feb19).

But it took the 38-year-old a long time to realise that she should merge all of her old letters and experiences into a book, especially considering how she was constantly asked by fans and friends for life advice.

“I’d be at, like, the dentist. He’d say, ‘Oh, Gisele, my niece is going through this tough time, would you write something?’ It was kind of funny; it’d be the most random moments,” the mother-of-two recalled of her inspiration for the project. “If I could allow myself to feel vulnerable and share, they would see that there is hope and light at the end of the tunnel…The letters seemed to really help these girls. One started an anti-bullying programme in school; another stopped being bulimic.”

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Erin O’Connor discusses why her thoughts on #MeToo have changed

Erin O’Connor initially dismissed the #MeToo movement as “glamorous noise from Hollywood” but has now changed her mind.The movement gained traction in the wake of the wave of sexual abuse allegations that began to sweep Hollywood in late 2017, though s…

Erin O’Connor initially dismissed the #MeToo movement as “glamorous noise from Hollywood” but has now changed her mind.

The movement gained traction in the wake of the wave of sexual abuse allegations that began to sweep Hollywood in late 2017, though social activist Tarana Burke actually coined the phrase in 2006.

In an essay for British GQ, English model Erin has discussed how her thoughts on #MeToo have drastically changed in recent months, as well as opening up about her “complex relationship with feminism”.

“Up until now I haven’t been on a march. I have trudged daily, believing in my own feminism, but couldn’t find my place in the movement. What changed?” she wrote. “Fundamentally, I haven’t changed, but the way I look at the Me Too movement has.

“To be blunt, my initial reaction to Me Too was that it was mainly glamorous noise from Hollywood. For every black dress swishing into focus, I feared we weren’t having conversations about everyday autonomy. How do we reach women whose daily existence is filled with fear, anguish and hopelessness, women who are trapped and punished and stifled because of being born the wrong race, the wrong class, the wrong sex?”

This led the 40-year-old to ask herself why she was more focused on the “women in black”, celebrities wearing black at big award ceremonies, rather than the perpetrators of sexual abuse.

She was also hit with the realisation that it is critical for older women to embolden the next generation, a fact that hit home after she listened to Baroness Helena Kennedy talking at a debate titled Has The Me Too Movement Gone Too Far?

“A willingness to listen is a willingness to change,” she continued. “And now I feel wholly determined to celebrate and promote Me Too and the many narratives it holds. I want to hear those future generations. I want to learn from them and see their battles won.

“Feminism is too often perceived as a barrier, but what it should be – for all genders – is an enlightenment.”

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Natalia Vodianova: ‘It would have been too risky to make me a #MeToo victim’

Natalia Vodianova wonders whether her career success is the reason she avoided sexual harassment in the fashion industry.The supermodel has covered numerous global magazines, walked the runway for the world’s most prestigious brands, and even won sever…

Natalia Vodianova wonders whether her career success is the reason she avoided sexual harassment in the fashion industry.

The supermodel has covered numerous global magazines, walked the runway for the world’s most prestigious brands, and even won several awards for her work as a philanthropist.

Unlike other models – such as Kate Upton, who accused Guess co-founder Paul Marciano of sexual harassment earlier this year (18) – Natalia claims she has never been a victim of sexual misconduct, and believes her good name in the industry may have protected her.

“It happens a lot. I think it’s maybe because I was so high up that I was too much of a risk to make a victim,” the 36-year-old pondered in an interview with Britain’s Channel 4. “But it’s fantastic that this is happening. It’s fantastic that women are having more freedom to voice what happened to them and giving platform to other women to not tolerate this kind of abuse.

“I hear all these stories, they are horrific and it’s incredible this movement has not happened earlier. It’s really unbelievable to me. I don’t know how I escaped it but it’s somehow never touched me.”

The Russian fashion icon has also became an important part of current affairs in her home nation, having previously been tapped as an ambassador of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and most recently as the ambassador of her native city Nizhny Novgorod during this year’s FIFA World Cup.

Natalia believes that hosting the event will bring many benefits to her home country, and questions those that claim Russia should not have been given the honour on account of its controversial political system.

“Well (Russian President Vladimir Putin’s) very loved in the country and yes he’s a very strong politician and he’s very defensive of Russia,” she said. “But I feel much safer walking alone at night in Moscow than I feel in Paris. And this is the reality. I absolutely do.”

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Alexandra Shipp: ‘It’s about time women of colour are recognised’

Alexandra Shipp is hoping that in the wake of the #MeToo movement, more women will be there to support each other.Earlier this month (Jun18) the X-Men: Apocalypse actress picked up the Women in Film Max Mara Face of the Future Award at the Women In Fil…

Alexandra Shipp is hoping that in the wake of the #MeToo movement, more women will be there to support each other.

Earlier this month (Jun18) the X-Men: Apocalypse actress picked up the Women in Film Max Mara Face of the Future Award at the Women In Film Crystal and Lucy Awards, marking the first time an African-American star has won the honour.

“It’s about darn time in this day and age that there’s more and more representation, especially of women of colour. And also it’s this idea that women are supporting women. I want to continue that,” she smiled to The Hollywood Reporter. “Women can help cultivate the next generation of women just through conversation.

“I hope that this next generation, especially with the #MeToo movement and the Time’s Up movement, is able to protect each other. I think what we’ve seen at least in the last couple of months is how strong we are together when we’re united.”

The movements came about in the wake of the sexual harassment allegations that swept through Hollywood late last year following an expose on disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein.

And when it comes to the next generation of Hollywood stars, 26-year-old Alexandra says she wants there to be a “domino effect”.

“I want everyone to be supporting everyone,” she added. “No competition. We’re not each others’ competition. We’re on the same team. Men are always supporting men. Women should start being together, and I think that’s what we’ll see with this next generation. But we’re also seeing it now, and how beautiful is that?”

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Donatella Versace stands by sexy outfits in wake of #MeToo era

Donatella Versace is adamant that women should still wear sexy outfits in the #MeToo era.The 63-year-old is chief designer at Versace, a label renowned for its racy aesthetic popularised by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Elizabeth Hurley, who h…

Donatella Versace is adamant that women should still wear sexy outfits in the #MeToo era.

The 63-year-old is chief designer at Versace, a label renowned for its racy aesthetic popularised by celebrities such as Jennifer Lopez and Elizabeth Hurley, who have worn the brand’s designs to many A-list events.

Though conversations about the sexual harassment of women are still rife in the film, music and fashion industries, Versace doesn’t believe the ongoing discussions should determine the way women dress.

“To be empowered is to look your best, to show femininity,” she insisted in an interview with The Times. “Sexy is an attitude. It doesn’t have to be about sex. It can mean, ‘Look at me, I have something to say.’ Female empowerment is not someone in a pair of jeans and no make-up. What are you supposed to do because of #MeToo, become unsexy?”

Though the fashion legend has strong opinions when it comes to style, she is open to debate and shared that the popularisation of social media definitely has had an influence on her professional decisions.

“It’s a revolution. Now you have direct contact with a younger generation. You can listen to different people from all over the world, and it makes it easier to understand that you need to change,” the platinum blonde star shared. “That’s when I began to push it a little bit. It was these conversations on the Internet which changed what I was doing completely. The Internet is an instrument that lets you be in tune.”

During the interview, Versace spoke about her late brother Gianni Versace, who was tragically murdered in 1997. Like her, the designer also had powerful ideas about the best way to dress, but his sister was never afraid to tell him the truth.

“No one else had the courage (to say no to him),” she smiled. “I would say, ‘This is wrong. Let’s do it again.'”

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