Emilio Estevez gave real-life homeless people jobs in new film The Public

Emilio Estevez invited real-life homeless people to appear in his new movie about a group of vagrants who take over a library during a winter storm. The Breakfast Club actor and his cast, including Alec Baldwin and Michael K. Williams, shot The Public…

Emilio Estevez invited real-life homeless people to appear in his new movie about a group of vagrants who take over a library during a winter storm.

The Breakfast Club actor and his cast, including Alec Baldwin and Michael K. Williams, shot The Public at a Cincinnati, Ohio library from 7pm to 7am and often watched folks who had fallen on hard times leave the premises as they arrived to film.

“We invited a number of them to come and join us and I think they felt empowered,” Emilio tells Today. “I said, ‘Come and be a part of this. There will be a pay cheque, we’re gonna feed you, so their dignity was restored.”

The film hits cinemas in North America on Friday (05Apr19), and the actor/director revealed it’s appropriate the movie should be released this week – 12 years to the day Estevez first read the essay that inspired the project.

“April 1st, 2007, the L.A. Times arrived at the house, I opened it up and I read this article written by a former Salt Lake City librarian, named Chip Ward, and the essay was about how libraries have become de facto homeless shelters and how librarians have become de facto social workers and now first responders.

“I’ve watched the elements of the story unfolding in real time.”

Estevez tells WENN he almost shot the film in Los Angeles, but he wanted to use a library that could actually be the shelter in a storm for the homeless.

“Originally, the film was set in Los Angeles for two reasons. First, the Los Angeles Public Library’s Central Library, specifically its older section, is an architectural gem… Second, I thought that it would be wildly ironic that Los Angeles would be swept up in a cold snap, given how we are known for our enviably consistent sunny and 72 degree weather,” he explains.

“However, in recent years I have been spending time in Cincinnati, where my mother was born, and near Dayton, where my father grew up. During my visits, the director of the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Film Commission encouraged me to bring film production to the city, citing a generous state tax incentive that could help offset our production budget.

“I followed up and toured the large downtown location of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, and I saw immediately how my film could be relocated to Ohio quite easily with a few minor tweaks. And no temperature drop in Los Angeles can possibly compare with winter cold snaps in the Midwest, which are often lead stories on national news. So Cincinnati became the perfect city to set the story for The Public.”

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Michael K. Williams still processing pain of his cut from Han Solo spinoff

Actor Michael K. Williams hasn’t really gotten over his character’s removal from Solo: A Star Wars Story.The sci-fi franchise spinoff film about the origins of legendary character Han Solo lost its first directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller last …

Actor Michael K. Williams hasn’t really gotten over his character’s removal from Solo: A Star Wars Story.

The sci-fi franchise spinoff film about the origins of legendary character Han Solo lost its first directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller last year (17), when the duo backed out of the project due to creative differences.

When replacement director Ron Howard stepped in to lead the production, he restructured the storyline, requiring Williams to return to set to reshoot key scenes, but the 51-year-old could not do so thanks to preexisting work commitments with his film The Red Sea Diving Resort, prompting the filmmaker to completely cut him out of the feature.

Howard went back to the drawing board and reworked Michael’s former character Dryden Vos, an extraterrestrial crime-lord, by adding Paul Bettany to the cast instead, and Williams admits he still has some remorse over ultimately missing out on the part.

“What saddens me most is I was very proud of the work that I did,” he explains on Entertainment Weekly’s EW Morning Live satellite radio show. “What I believe I have created with (co-stars) Emilia Clarke and Woody Harrelson and Alden (Ehrenreich, who plays Solo)… I thought it was some great work. We was (sic) on the spaceship, and we all had these amazing scenes together, and I thought it was a great opportunity, and I thought it was some great stuff. It’s unfortunate the world won’t get to see it.”

However, Michael isn’t taking his axing too hard, revealing he still has a sense of humour about the situation.

“There are some things in life, you just gotta laugh at it,” he smiles. “That was such an odd turn of events. That’s not the norm. As crazy a town as Hollywood is — I like to be the one that says I’ve seen a little bit of everything in this town — that was one for the textbooks. What are the odds of that happening? There comes a point, you just gotta throw your hands up and, you know what, it just wasn’t meant to be.”

Solo: A Star Wars Story, which also stars Donald Glover as handsome swindler Lando Calrissian, reaches U.S. theatres in May (18).

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