Edie Campbell still can’t believe she was deemed ‘too fat’ for fashion show

Edie Campbell was “absolutely fuming” when she was told she was “too fat” to open a show at Milan Fashion Week earlier this year. The British model, who is a U.S. size two (U.K. size six), revealed on Instagram in February that she had been set to ope…

Edie Campbell was “absolutely fuming” when she was told she was “too fat” to open a show at Milan Fashion Week earlier this year.

The British model, who is a U.S. size two (U.K. size six), revealed on Instagram in February that she had been set to open for a label, but they decided she was “too fat” to open their show.

Opening up about the incident with Britain’s The Guardian, the 29-year-old, who walked for brands such as Fendi and Alberta Ferretti during that Milan Fashion Week, said she was “incensed” her agent only heard the news through word-of-mouth gossip.

“I was absolutely fuming to be told by a brand that I was ‘too fat’ to open this year’s Milan Fashion Week. A chain of Chinese whispers got back to my agent, who had to call and tell me that, ‘It had been a little bit difficult in the fitting’ and ‘You’re a little bit bigger than you were last year.’ I was incensed that I had to find out that way,” she recalled.

At the time, Campbell revealed the news by sharing a picture of her and her friend, artist Christabel MacGreevy, eating pastries for breakfast in a hotel room.

“When a brand says you are ‘too big’ to open their show so you get round @christabitch to have a slap up brekkie,” the model wrote. “By ‘too big’ I don’t mean ‘too famous’ I mean Too Fat.”

Elsewhere in the interview, the catwalk star admitted modelling had its challenges.

“Modelling is hard and strange in slippery ways. Being put in front of a camera and told to be sexy can be cringe-worthy – until you’ve worked it out,” she explained. “Quite often you’re standing in front of the camera and someone will say, ‘Can you dance?’ and you’re the only person in the room dancing. It’s mortifying.”

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Dolce & Gabbana heads on jungle safari for spring 2020

Dolce & Gabbana has served up safari chic for its spring/summer 2020 collection.Founders Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have largely steered clear of the spotlight since they were forced to cancel their runway show in Shanghai, China last November …

Dolce & Gabbana has served up safari chic for its spring/summer 2020 collection.

Founders Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have largely steered clear of the spotlight since they were forced to cancel their runway show in Shanghai, China last November after critics accused them of ridiculing Chinese culture in an Instagram campaign.

However, the Italian fashion designers staged a quiet comeback at the Metropol theatre as part of Milan Fashion Week on Sunday night, with their presentation drawing in the likes of Sofia Vergara, Monica Bellucci, Kitty Spencer, and Toni Garrn.

With the backdrop decorated with floral foliage, ferns, and a leopard print runway, the pair made no secret of the theme, with Gabbana commenting to Vogue.com, “(It’s the) Sicilian jungle…We enjoy making something glamorous, and we love the sense of happiness, summertime. It’s our philosophy.”

The spectacle opened with a parade of models sporting khaki safari jackets and cargo pants, with the looks paired with green accessories, gold jewellery, headscarves, and leopard print separates.

A number of garments containing animal imagery followed. One dress had a large giraffe motif across the front, while another depicted a cockatoo perched on a branch.

Referencing their Sicilian roots, Dolce and Gabbana interspersed the collection with figure-hugging black cocktail dresses and flowing numbers with deep-V necklines and lush jungle prints, and also dropped in a few miniskirts, bikini tops, and crochet dresses.

Highlights of the range included a translucent overcoat printed with delicate jungle foliage and tropical animals, a giraffe print dress, and a two-piece ensemble dotted with pineapple motifs which was paired with a dark green feathered overcoat.

To conclude, Dolce and Gabbana unveiled a line of evening dresses, mostly featuring prints of parrots, bird of paradise flowers, and dark green plants.

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Gucci model stages protest during runway show

Model Ayesha Tan-Jones staged a “peaceful protest” against Gucci’s use of straitjackets during its Milan Fashion Week show on Sunday.The Italian fashion house’s spring/summer 2020 show opened with a series of models being propelled along a conveyor bel…

Model Ayesha Tan-Jones staged a “peaceful protest” against Gucci’s use of straitjackets during its Milan Fashion Week show on Sunday.

The Italian fashion house’s spring/summer 2020 show opened with a series of models being propelled along a conveyor belt catwalk while wearing a high fashion take on straitjackets, with creative director Alessandro Michele explaining that the designs made a statement about “the most extreme version of a uniform dictated by society and those who control it”.

However, Tan-Jones made it clear that they disapproved of the straitjackets, which were used for limiting the movements of patients in mental health facilities, by writing “Mental Health Is Not Fashion” on their hands and holding them up for the audience to see as they paraded down the runway. A press officer for the company confirmed the protest was not planned, according to editors at the Guardian.

Tan-Jones later shared a post on Instagram in which they stated that straitjackets symbolised “a cruel time in medicine when mental illness was not understood”, and called Gucci’s use of the imagery “hurtful and insensitive”, “in bad taste”, and “vulgar, unimaginative and offensive”.

In a new post on Monday, the non-binary musician and activist thanked fans for supporting their “peaceful protest” and revealed they and other models would be donating a portion of their fee to mental health charities.

In the show notes for their fashion show, Gucci bosses stated that the straitjackets would not be sold in stores, and were solely used to make a statement.

Gucci is no stranger to backlash. The brand sparked debate last year when it released a balaclava turtleneck that covered half the face and featured large red lips on a cut-out around the mouth. It was called out for evoking blackface iconography, with bosses quickly issuing an apology and removing the item from stores.

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Fendi serves up camping chic for spring 2020 collection

Fendi has unveiled a camping-inspired line for its spring/summer 2020 collection.On Thursday, Silvia Venturini Fendi unveiled her debut ready-to-wear line for the Italian label as part of Milan Fashion Week, with the designer having expanded her duties…

Fendi has unveiled a camping-inspired line for its spring/summer 2020 collection.

On Thursday, Silvia Venturini Fendi unveiled her debut ready-to-wear line for the Italian label as part of Milan Fashion Week, with the designer having expanded her duties at her family’s company following the death of womenswear creative director Karl Lagerfeld in February.

Katie Holmes, Diplo, and Sabrina Carpenter were among the celebrities perched on the front row, with a huge sunset motif installed as the backdrop to the runway.

“Impossible blooms and ethereal textures intertwine to trick the eye – shifting in weightless moments of Fendi craftsmanship, invoking the hidden decadence of the everyday,” a Fendi representative said of the inspiration for the collection. “Emerging from a waking dream, the Fendi woman delights in undone expressions of new Borghese energy.”

Silvia evidently wanted to symbolise a step into the future for Fendi, and the presentation opened with a model walking the catwalk in a white quilted jacket and miniskirt. The looked was matched with shimmery socks and pink loafers.

Influenced by camping adventures and the outdoors, a line of playful separates followed, with key pieces including printed shirts with leaf designs, shorts, and bucket hats.

References to late 1960s fashion were apparent too, with Silvia opting for a palette of dark yellow, ochre, and brown, along with touches of bright green and white.

Highlights included the cargo-style jumpsuit and trench coat modelled by Bella Hadid, and a coat with gauzy panels woven through the centre which was worn by the newly-blonde Kendall Jenner.

To close out the spectacle, Silvia unveiled a line-up of ensembles made with pastel or metallic fabrics, and concluded by having a model show off a long dress with wide sleeves that featured a very retro floral print in pink, green, and blue shades.

Milan Fashion Week continues on Friday with shows from Marni and Versace.

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Giorgio Armani to head up Fashion Film Festival Milano jury

Giorgio Armani has been appointed president of the 2019 Fashion Film Festival Milano jury. The Italian designer and his fellow jury members will judge 200 fashion films from 50 countries and award 17 winners competing in two different categories: Est…

Giorgio Armani has been appointed president of the 2019 Fashion Film Festival Milano jury.

The Italian designer and his fellow jury members will judge 200 fashion films from 50 countries and award 17 winners competing in two different categories: Established Talent and New Talent.

“Giorgio Armani immediately accepted our invitation with great enthusiasm. He was definitely the first to create a strong link between fashion and cinema and he is also so representative of the city of Milan that we thought he would have been the perfect godfather of the festival’s new format,” Fashion Film Festival Milano founder Constanza Cavalli Etro told WWD.

Armani, 84, will be joined on the jury by photographer Cass Bird, Oskar Metsavaht, founder of Brazilian fashion brand Osklen, Somali model Waris Dirie, fashion critic Angelo Flaccavento, Ezra Petronio from Self Service magazine, and Sissy Vian from Vogue Japan, among others.

They will also help decide who will win the inaugural Best New Italian Fashion Designer or Brand prize, which will honour the most talented up-and-coming fashion house in Italy.

The companies and personalities taking part in the film festival this year include Prada, Chanel, Gucci, Stella McCartney, Givenchy, Balenciaga, Miu Miu, model/actress Suki Waterhouse, Call Me by Your Name director Luca Guadagnino, and German filmmaker Wim Wenders.

The Fashion Film Festival Milano used to take place during Milan Fashion Week, but the sixth edition has been moved to bring more attention to the event, and will be held at the Anteo Palazzo Del Cinema theatre between 6 and 10 November.

“All the screenings are free and the talks are fully open to the public. This is something crucial for us, something we fight for and which enables us to be the most prestigious fashion film festival in the world,” Etro added.

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Gucci accused of cultural appropriation over turban-style headpiece

Gucci has been accused of cultural appropriation over the sale of a turban-inspired headpiece.In February, bosses at the Italian fashion house, led by creative director Alessandro Michele, were forced to issue an apology and set up diversity schemes af…

Gucci has been accused of cultural appropriation over the sale of a turban-inspired headpiece.

In February, bosses at the Italian fashion house, led by creative director Alessandro Michele, were forced to issue an apology and set up diversity schemes after fans pointed out that they were advertising a knitted jumper that resembled blackface – the controversial makeover white people adopt to look like black figures.

Now, Gucci has sparked outrage from the Sikh community over a cotton headwrap being sold for $790 (£618) by U.S. retailers such as Nordstrom, with the piece appearing to be very similar to the traditional headwear, also known as dastaar, which represents honour, self-respect, courage and piety.

“The Sikh turban is not just a fashion accessory, but it’s also a sacred religious article of faith. We hope more can be done to recognise this critical context. #appropriation,” an official from the New York Sikh Coalition wrote on Twitter, while Vancouver-based reporter Taran Parmar commented of the headpiece, “Seriously @Nordstrom @gucci ? The turban is one of the most important and symbolic articles of faith for Sikhs, and you’re selling it as a fashion accessory to make money? This isn’t the first time you’ve come under fire for cultural appropriation. Do better.”

In addition, another Twitter user named Aasees Kaur pointed out that those who wear turbans for religious reasons have been targets of violence in the past.

“This is beyond aggravating. Did someone at @gucci even bother to figure out what a dastaar (turban) means to Sikhs? Did it cross your minds to consider the history behind our identity? My people are discriminated against, even killed, for wearing a turban,” she stated.

The item was previously sold on the Nordstrom website with the description, “Indy Full Head Wrap”. It is no longer available.

Gucci’s turban was first unveiled during a runway presentation held as part of Milan Fashion Week in February 2018.

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Moschino teams with Sephora on office supply-themed collection

Moschino has teamed with Sephora on a new office supply-themed line of beauty products.The luxury Italian fashion house, helmed by designer Jeremy Scott, is known for its irreverent and quirky clothes, shoes, handbags and accessories. Scott first partn…

Moschino has teamed with Sephora on a new office supply-themed line of beauty products.

The luxury Italian fashion house, helmed by designer Jeremy Scott, is known for its irreverent and quirky clothes, shoes, handbags and accessories.

Scott first partnered with executives at French beauty giant Sephora in August 2017, and in light of the success of his debut seven-piece line, has now introduced a follow-up which evokes the bold squiggles featured in his ready-to-wear collection that was unveiled as part of Milan Fashion Week in September 2018.

“I HAVE SUPER EXCITING NEWS FOR MY BEAUTY FANS… I CREATED A NEW MAKE -UP COLLECTION FOR SEPHORA!!!” he captioned a snap of the range on his Instagram page. “THE @moschino X @sephora @sc COLLECTION LAUNCHES APRIL 25 TH ONLINE AND IN SEPHORA STORES IN US & CANADA BUT HERE IS A SNEAK PEEK AT MY OFFICE SUPPLY THEMED COLLECTION!”

The line includes an eyeshadow palette which is contained in a compact shaped as a laptop, a black liquid eyeliner which looks like a felt tip marker, pen-like lip glosses, and highlighters. There is also a white nail polish, called Whiteout, a line of pink sponges shaped like erasers, and a five-piece brush set which resemble sharpened pencils.

Model Remington Williams appears in the accompanying campaign, which was shot by photographer Marcus Mam.

Taking to social media, Remington shared that shooting the marketing imagery was a full circle moment for her as she had considered working at Sephora stores in the past.

“Fun fact: I applied to work at Sephora quite a few times. It never worked out in the past. Sometimes the world completes the circle better then I could have dreamed. Thank you @itsjeremyscott @moschino @sc@sephora and @marcus_mam for fulfilling a dream of mine. This is extra special to me,” she wrote.

Items in the Moschino x Sephora collection are priced between $12 and $60 (£9 – £46), and will hit shelves at selected stores from 25 April (19).

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Paul Surridge confirms exit from Roberto Cavalli

Paul Surridge is leaving Roberto Cavalli after almost two years at the brand.The British designer joined the Italian label in May 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director. However, rumours began to swirl last week (ends24Mar19) that Surridge …

Paul Surridge is leaving Roberto Cavalli after almost two years at the brand.

The British designer joined the Italian label in May 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director.

However, rumours began to swirl last week (ends24Mar19) that Surridge was looking to exit his post, and on Monday (25Mar19), he took to Instagram to confirm his plans.

“I have given much consideration to this decision and reached the conclusion that the mission I have signed has changed and enters a new direction with a new perspective (sic),” he wrote. “I now wish to focus on other projects that I put aside in order to achieve our common goals with Roberto Cavalli Group. It has been an honour to work for this iconic Florentine company with a unique heritage. I want to thank everyone who has made this journey possible, the internal teams and especially Gian Giacomo Ferraris who has given me outstanding support and will remain a mentor.”

Representatives for Roberto Cavalli Group and chief executive officer Gian Giacomo Ferraris have yet to comment on Surridge’s departure.

In the days leading up to the designer’s exit, editors at WWD reported that his decision was due to a lack of investment in the development and refurbishment of the store network, as well as in marketing and communications. He was also alleged to have been unhappy about the level of support offered to the design team.

“The decision last summer to look for an external investor and, more recently, to not provide any more funding have made the original project impossible, and therefore triggered Paul’s decision to look elsewhere,” one source divulged to the fashion publication.

Prior to joining Cavalli, Surridge predominantly worked in the menswear departments for labels including Prada, Burberry, Calvin Klein, and Jil Sander. In June 2018, the designer unveiled a full menswear line for Roberto Cavalli, and most recently showed a collection as part of Milan Fashion Week in February.

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Fendi celebrates Karl Lagerfeld with tribute T-shirt

Fendi has celebrated former creative director for fur and women’s ready-to-wear, Karl Lagerfeld, with the launch of a new T-shirt that honours the late designer.The JoKarl Fashion Show T-shirt is available in short-sleeved and long-sleeved options, and…

Fendi has celebrated former creative director for fur and women’s ready-to-wear, Karl Lagerfeld, with the launch of a new T-shirt that honours the late designer.

The JoKarl Fashion Show T-shirt is available in short-sleeved and long-sleeved options, and comes in either a black or while base colour.

At the centre of the garment is an illustration by Italian artist Nico Vascellari, depicting Lagerfeld as the joker on a playing card complete with jester costume and his notorious dark sunglasses

On the long-sleeved edition, drawings of dice with Fendi’s FF logo line the sleeves, and the back of each style features a smaller version of the JoKarl card.

The T-shirts are priced between $590 (£449) and $690 (£525) for the short-sleeve and long-sleeve editions respectively and can be purchased now from Fendi’s online store.

Fendi had previously honoured the fashion legend at its Milan Fashion Week Fall/Winter 19 show last month (Feb19), which took place just two days after the star passed away following a battle with pancreatic cancer on 19 Feb.

Honouring the fashion legend, who’d been at the house since 1965, Silvia Venturini Fendi paid an emotional tribute to her late friend and colleague as the show closed, with a video playing out of Lagerfeld’s hand, decked out in his signature leather fingerless gloves, sketching the word Fendi out.

Chanel also paid tribute to Lagerfeld, who was creative director at the house, during its Paris Fashion Week Fall/Winter 19 presentation.

At the event, held at Paris’ Grand Palais, each seat bore an illustration of the late designer alongside brand namesake Coco Chanel, with the poignant words “the beat goes on…”.

The show was also preceded by a one-minute silence, after which the celebrated fashion star’s voice was heard over the venue’s tannoy, beginning the presentation.

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Paul Surridge rumoured to be leaving Roberto Cavalli

Paul Surridge is reportedly close to resigning from Roberto Cavalli.The English designer joined the label in 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director.However, sources have told WWD that Surridge is no longer happy in the role and is on the ve…

Paul Surridge is reportedly close to resigning from Roberto Cavalli.

The English designer joined the label in 2017, succeeding Peter Dundas as creative director.

However, sources have told WWD that Surridge is no longer happy in the role and is on the verge of walking away from Roberto Cavalli.

An insider claimed his decision comes down to a lack of investment in the development and refurbishment of the store network as well as in marketing and communications. He is also said to feel the design team has not been supported, as resources have been scarce.

“The decision last summer to look for an external investor and, more recently, to not provide any more funding have made the original project impossible, and therefore triggered Paul’s decision to look elsewhere,” one source divulged.

So far, there has been no official comment on the reports. Surridge enjoyed a career in menswear design before joining Roberto Cavalli, previously holding posts at Prada, Burberry, Calvin Klein, and Jil Sander.

Despite his history in men’s fashion, Roberto Cavalli chief executive officer Gian Giacomo Ferraris was confident Surridge was the perfect fit for the Italian label and commented at the time of his appointment: “I have worked with Paul, and I had the opportunity to appreciate his creative talent as well as his managerial abilities. Paul has a 360-degree vision on brands and branding. He is passionate, mature, and an amazing team player.”

In June 2018, Surridge unveiled a full menswear line for the label. He most recently showed as part of Milan Fashion Week in February.

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