Anna Wintour approves of Rihanna’s ‘simple’ fashion line

Anna Wintour has given her seal of approval to Rihanna’s clothing line.The U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief is one of the most important figures in the fashion world, and over the course of her career, has been praised for her ability to spot trends and disc…

Anna Wintour has given her seal of approval to Rihanna’s clothing line.

The U.S. Vogue editor-in-chief is one of the most important figures in the fashion world, and over the course of her career, has been praised for her ability to spot trends and discover designers.

Now, Wintour has praised Rihanna for launching her high-end Fenty range in partnership with executives at LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton, with the collection including menswear-inspired separates and lots of denim.

“Well, obviously if anyone can be successful at designing clothing, it’s going to be Rihanna. So, I am certain that that will be a huge success for LVMH,” she said in a new interview for her Go Ask Anna video series. “But there are other popstars over the years that have had equal success. Look at Pharrell (Williams) or Victoria Beckham. Or indeed, Kanye West. When we look at Rihanna’s collection, one might be surprised how simple it is. She’s not looking to be the trend of the month. She’s looking for clothes that have a life and that you can wear again and again which is very much in-step with, I think, the way that fashion is going right now with sustainability. And as always with Rihanna, she is always in-step with the moment.”

Elsewhere in the chat, Wintour was asked about her own wardrobe, and she noted that she loves printed dresses and Manolo Blahnik footwear. She surprisingly also confessed she “loves a flip-flop” and predicts cross-body handbags will be a major trend.

“To be honest, I rarely wear a handbag, but I am told by my team here at Vogue that it’s all about the cross-body handbag. Which makes a lot of sense to me because it’s practical, hands-free. You can bicycle around Manhattan enjoying Central Park and they also come in every shape, size, fabrication, so that would be my tip for the season,” the 69-year-old smiled.

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Kering commits to only working with models aged over 18

Executives at fashion conglomerate Kering have reaffirmed their commitment to only hiring models over the age of 18.Over the past two years, bosses at top houses and media corporations have introduced new codes of conduct regarding photoshoots and runw…

Executives at fashion conglomerate Kering have reaffirmed their commitment to only hiring models over the age of 18.

Over the past two years, bosses at top houses and media corporations have introduced new codes of conduct regarding photoshoots and runway shows in light of the #MeToo movement and claims of sexual misconduct in the entertainment and fashion industries,

Now, bosses at Kering – which owns luxury brands like Gucci, Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, and Alexander McQueen – have stated that they will only hire models aged over 18.

“As a global luxury group, we are conscious of the influence exerted on younger generations in particular by the images produced by our houses,” declared Francois-Henri Pinault, chairman and chief executive officer of Kering, in a statement. “We believe that we have a responsibility to put forward the best possible practices in the luxury sector and we hope to create a movement that will encourage others to follow suit.”

Back in September 2017, leaders at Kering and LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton introduced a charter with the aim of banning very thin and underage models from the runway.

The new regulation may mean models like Kaia Gerber, 17, miss out on gigs for a few months. However, a spokesperson for the company is adamant hiring models over the age of 18 signals further progress in a “continued commitment” to women.

“In our view, the physiological and psychological maturity of models aged over 18 seems more appropriate to the rhythm and demands that are involved in this profession. We are also aware of the role model element that images produced by our houses can represent for certain groups of people,” added Marie-Claire Daveu, Kering’s chief sustainability officer.

The new guidelines will be enacted as of the fall/winter 2020 shows.

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Bode and Bethany Williams among 2019 LVMH Prize finalists

Bode’s Emily Adams Bode and Bethany Williams are among the finalists for the 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Designers.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designer …

Bode’s Emily Adams Bode and Bethany Williams are among the finalists for the 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Designers.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designer competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Wednesday (27Mar19), organisers announced the final group of eight designers, with Bode, a New York-based menswear designer, and London-based designer Williams, an advocate for sustainable fashion and the second winner of the Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design, in the running.

Other finalists include Japanese designer Kunihiko Morinaga of Anrealage, Israel-based Hed Mayner, American fashion star Spencer Phipps, who is currently working in Paris, Stefan Cooke and Jake Burt of British label Stefan Cooke, Nigerian designer Kenneth Izedonmwen of Kenneth Ize, and South Africa’s Thebe Magugu.

With regard to the finalists, Delphine Arnault, the executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, said she was pleased to see so much diversity and noted that it was the first time the contest has had finalists representing South Africa, Nigeria, and Israel.

“Each new edition brings its lot of firsts,” she said in an interview for Vogue.com. “It goes to show the reach of the prize on the one hand, and on the other, the reach of fashion, its ability to touch more and more people, thanks in part to the Internet. It is truly a unifying dynamic.”

The winner of the LVMH Prize for Young Designers, who will take home $338,000 (£255,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months, will be announced at an event in June.

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Chiara Ferragni named as latest addition to LVMH panel

Chiara Ferragni is joining the prestigious LVMH Prize panel along with 15 other fashion figures.The Italian fashion influencer, who boasts 15.9 million Instagram followers, is being welcomed into the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) fold to help judg…

Chiara Ferragni is joining the prestigious LVMH Prize panel along with 15 other fashion figures.

The Italian fashion influencer, who boasts 15.9 million Instagram followers, is being welcomed into the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) fold to help judge the Young Fashion Designers prize.

She joins fellow newcomers British Vogue editor-in-chief Edward Enninful and supermodel Naomi Campbell.

“We are thrilled to welcome this year both prominent personalities from traditional fashion media and professionals who have succeeded in creating innovative online platforms for communication and commerce,” said LVMH’s Delphine Arnault in a statement.

There are now 62 experts sitting on the panel, with around half coming from a traditional media background, and the others from newer mediums.

“However, the titles represented also have a presence online, and the line between print and web has become increasingly blurred,” Delphine commented to WWD. “The appearance in recent years of pure web players has been a game-changer and created new platforms for fashion lovers who yearned to express something new.

“They represent fertile ground for expression and opportunity for designers. The emergence of certain pure players has been a springboard for young designers, alongside a specialist press that spots them. It was our duty to identify and support these new opportunities to support the development of young brands.”

Chiara made her name through blog The Blonde Salad, and the last few years has been tapped by Lancome, Intimissimi and Tod’s, among other brands.

Applications for the 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers closes on 4 February. Previous winners include Marques’Almeida and Thomas Tait.

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LVMH cuts ties with Bono and Ali Hewson’s fashion label Edun

Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) executives are divesting from fashion label Edun.The company was founded by U2 frontman Bono and his wife Ali Hewson in 2005 to promote trade in Africa by sourcing production throughout the continent, with the brand o…

Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) executives are divesting from fashion label Edun.

The company was founded by U2 frontman Bono and his wife Ali Hewson in 2005 to promote trade in Africa by sourcing production throughout the continent, with the brand offering a range of ready-to-wear, handbags and accessories.

In 2009, Bono and Ali sold a 49 per cent stake to French luxury conglomerate LVMH, but on Thursday (28Jun18) it was confirmed that bosses were set to transfer shares back to founders, with Edun to cease current operations.

“In light of a joint review of the business, Edun is restructuring its operations in preparation for its next chapter and LVMH will transfer its shares back to the founders,” an Edun spokesperson said in a statement, according to Business of Fashion. “The founders remain committed to Edun’s mission for sustainable fashion and thank LVMH for its support and dedication during this journey together.”

Edun’s spring/summer 2018 collection will be its last, while the brand’s only Manhattan boutique closed at the end of May. The brand’s website is still currently active.

Following LVMH’s initial investment, Irish designer Sharon Wauchob was appointed as creative director, with Bono and Ali appearing in a Louis Vuitton campaign, shot by Annie Leibovitz in Africa, the following year.

After a string of shake-ups at the company, former Alexander Wang and The Row designer Danielle Sherman joined in 2013, helming the design team until her departure in May 2016. Since then, Edun has had a “collective” of designers work on collections.

Neither Bono nor Ali have commented on the decision. However, Business of Fashion editors confirmed that current chief executive Julien Labat, who joined in 2015, will remain with the company through the new phase.

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Chanel publishes financial results for first time

Chanel has lifted the veil on its financial status for the first time.The French luxury fashion label is a privately held company owned by Alain Wertheimer and Gerard Wertheimer, grandsons of Pierre Wertheimer, who was a business partner of founder Coc…

Chanel has lifted the veil on its financial status for the first time.

The French luxury fashion label is a privately held company owned by Alain Wertheimer and Gerard Wertheimer, grandsons of Pierre Wertheimer, who was a business partner of founder Coco Chanel.

Chanel, which has been helmed by creative director Karl Lagerfeld since 1983, continues to be one of the most sought-after brands, with chief financial officer Philippe Blondiaux unveiling its profit figures for the first-ever time in 109 years on Thursday (21Jun18).

“This financial statement shows that we are amazingly solid financially and we can keep our status as a private, independent company for the next few centuries,” Blondiaux said in an interview, according to Reuters. “Instead of having others report (about us), we’ve decided to put the facts on the table about who we are.”

Chanel reported revenue of $9.62 billion (£7.2 billion) for 2017, an 11 per cent rise from a year earlier. Profits grew 18.5 per cent from a year earlier to $1.79 billion (£1.35 billion).

The figures cement Chanel’s status as one of the biggest fashion companies in the world. Chanel’s rivals, including Louis Vuitton parent company Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH), are listed on the stock market and have to report figures regularly.

Blondiaux went on to explain that the decision to talk about the company’s position was not an indicator that bosses were considering a stock market listing. He also rejected speculation that they were looking to sell.

In addition, Blondiaux also shared that there are no plans to begin selling Chanel garments online.

“Even in this digital age we believe human interaction will remain key to the interaction between high-end customers and a brand like Chanel,” he added.

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Doublet’s Masayuki Ino wins 2018 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers

Doublet designer Masayuki Ino has won the 2018 Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) Prize for Young Fashion Designers.Each year, LVMH executives reward an upcoming designer, selected for his or her talent and outstanding creativity, with a $354,000 (£26…

Doublet designer Masayuki Ino has won the 2018 Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) Prize for Young Fashion Designers.

Each year, LVMH executives reward an upcoming designer, selected for his or her talent and outstanding creativity, with a $354,000 (£262,000) grant, one-year of mentorship and support in all areas of business expertise.

After nine designers were shortlisted by 48 international fashion industry experts, it was announced at a ceremony in Paris on Wednesday (06Jun18) that Japanese streetwear star Ino was the winner, while Korean designer Rok Hwang of the label Rokh was the runner-up.

“We were impressed by the contemporary resourcefulness that instills Masayuki Ino’s designs with an urban touch infused with fresh poetry,” Delphine Arnault, director and executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, said in a statement. “We have also awarded a Special Prize to Rok Hwang. We were seduced by Rok Hwang’s designs, by his feminine, sensuous and empowering creations and by his command of complex pattern-making.”

Hwang will receive a $177,000 (£130,000) grant and a one-year mentoring programme from LVMH. The fifth edition of the LVMH Prize saw over 1,300 young talents from more than 90 countries compete.

A number of high-profile names were included on the judging panel, such as Loewe’s J.W. Anderson, Dior’s Maria Grazia Chiuri, Louis Vuitton’s Nicolas Ghesquiere, Marc Jacobs, Givenchy’s Clare Waight Keller, Karl Lagerfeld, Kenzo’s Humberto Leon and Carol Lim.

Arnault, Jean-Paul Claverie and chairman and Chief Executive Officer of LVMH, Sidney Toledano, were also panelists, while Louis Vuitton brand ambassadors Emma Stone and Jaden Smith were on hand to present the winners with trophies.

In addition to the main winners, the event organisers also singled out three young graduates from fashion schools, Archie M. Alled-Martinez, Maya Chantout and Scylia Chevaux, who will work at LVMH fashion houses for the next year.

Last year, French designer Marine Serre was the recipient of the LVMH Prize and a Special Prize was awarded to Japanese designer Kozaburo Akasaka.

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Nicolas Ghesquiere pleased to have renewed Louis Vuitton role

Nicolas Ghesquiere is “very pleased” to have renewed his contract at Louis Vuitton.The French fashion designer officially replaced Marc Jacobs at the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH)-owned luxury label as creative director for women’s collections in …

Nicolas Ghesquiere is “very pleased” to have renewed his contract at Louis Vuitton.

The French fashion designer officially replaced Marc Jacobs at the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH)-owned luxury label as creative director for women’s collections in late 2013.

While it was rumoured in 2016 that Ghesquiere was planning to launch his own brand, the story was later denied, and he has now renewed his commitment to the Paris-based company.

“I am very pleased to open the next chapter of the story I started with Louis Vuitton almost five years ago,” Ghesquiere said in a statement on Wednesday (23May18). “Balancing an incredible heritage with a constant quest for innovation has always been an essential part of my work, it is also at the centre of the history of this company and I look forward to further develop the codes we have implemented over the last years.”

In recent months, the fashion industry has seen series of shake-ups within the men’s fashion industry, with Kim Jones replacing Kris Van Assche as head of Dior Homme and former Saint Laurent and Dior Homme designer Hedi Slimane joining Celine.

But it seems Ghesquiere, 47, is content with his current position and Michael Burke, chairman and chief executive officer of Louis Vuitton, couldn’t be happier with his head designer.

“I am excited to continue working with Nicolas and the energy he brings to Louis Vuitton. He has established a strong, daring Louis Vuitton aesthetic imbued with the spirit of the house and his own sensibility. I am particularly proud of our achievements together,” the executive shared.

While LVMH chairman Bernard Arnault added: “I am very happy that we are continuing our Louis Vuitton womenswear journey with Nicolas.”

Ghesquiere will present his cruise collection for Louis Vuitton on 28 May at the Fondation Maeght in Saint-Paul de Vence on the French Riviera.

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Kering to appeal ruling awarding Hedi Slimane over $11 million

Kering’s lawyers will reportedly appeal a court ruling awarding Hedi Slimane at least $11.5 million (£8.2 million).Executives at the French luxury conglomerate have been embroiled in a complicated legal battle with the fashion designer since his dep…

Kering’s lawyers will reportedly appeal a court ruling awarding Hedi Slimane at least $11.5 million (£8.2 million).

Executives at the French luxury conglomerate have been embroiled in a complicated legal battle with the fashion designer since his departure from Yves Saint Laurent in March 2016 after a four-year tenure as creative director at the brand.

Most recently, Slimane has taken Kering to court over the amount of money he was paid for his last year at the label, with a French commercial court ruling in late March (18) that the style star was underpaid as much as $11.5 million after taxes, having originally been paid approximately $933,000 (£667,000).

During court proceedings, it was disclosed that Slimane had a clause in his contract that guaranteed him at least $12 million a year, with most of the funds being offered as stock with the company.

In response to the ruling, bosses at Kering confirmed to WWD that they would appeal the decision but would not give further comment on the case. Slimane’s lawyers also declined to give a statement on the latest development.

Slimane previously took Kering to court in 2016 after the company did not apply the non-compete clause in his contract, thus shorting him of a significant sum, with it reported at the time that Kering was ordered to pay him $13 million (£9.2 million).

It’s not the first time Kering, the parent company of Gucci, Balenciaga, Alexander McQueen and Brioni, has entered into a legal contest with an employee.

In 2013, lawyers representing Balenciaga sued Nicolas Ghesquiere over negative comments he made about the company in an interview following his departure. The highly publicised suit was mediated out of court.

Anthony Vaccarello has succeeded Slimane at the design helm of Saint Laurent, while the Paris-born designer was appointed as creative director of Celine, owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH), in January.

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Haider Ackermann exiting Berluti

Haider Ackermann is departing Berluti after three seasons at the label.The Colombian-born designer joined the Paris-based menswear brand in September 2016 and has since gone on to build a reputation for his sharp suits and eye-catching accessories.But …

Haider Ackermann is departing Berluti after three seasons at the label.

The Colombian-born designer joined the Paris-based menswear brand in September 2016 and has since gone on to build a reputation for his sharp suits and eye-catching accessories.

But on Friday (30Mar18), bosses at Berluti parent company Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) announced that Ackermann was exiting his role as creative director.

“Haider has been at the core of the evolution of Berluti’s collections and image these past few seasons,” said Berluti’s chief executive officer Antoine Arnault, according to WWD. “I want to thank him for everything he has accomplished since his arrival. His feel for materials, colours, and his wonderful shows will always be linked to the history of the house.”

Ackermann studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp and went on to work at John Galliano before starting his eponymous line in 2001.

He has not yet shared whether he will be joining another fashion house or concentrating on his own brand but uploaded a statement on Instagram in which he explained how happy he was to have been a part of the Berluti story.

“I am immensely proud to have been able to put my creativity at the service of this house with an exceptional know-how, whilst working with a passionate team. I thank them for their commitment,” he added.

Ackermann’s exit marks another shake-up within the world of men’s fashion, as Hedi Slimane has recently joined Celine, where he will debut menswear, and Kim Jones has left his role at Louis Vuitton in order to take up the role of head menswear designer at Dior Homme, succeeding Kris Van Assche. Off-White designer Virgil Abloh will replace Jones at Louis Vuitton.

Berluti executives are expected to announce Ackermann’s successor shortly.

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