Prabal Gurung donates 2,000 face masks to New York City hospitals

Prabal Gurung has donated 2,000 masks to frontline workers amid the coronavirus crisis.Last month, the Nepalese-American designer announced that he was preparing his workshop and staff members to start manufacturing personal protective equipment (PPE) …

Prabal Gurung has donated 2,000 masks to frontline workers amid the coronavirus crisis.

Last month, the Nepalese-American designer announced that he was preparing his workshop and staff members to start manufacturing personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline healthcare employees in light of the Covid-19 pandemic.

However, Gurung has since discovered that PPE is a “complex and heavily regulated product which falls outside the scope of our manufacturing capabilities”, so he has teamed with officials at The COVID Foundation to donate approximately 2,000 3M respirator masks to hospitals in New York City.

“We invite you to join us in supporting our medical professions and essential workers through donating directly to this fund,” he wrote in an Instagram post. “One hundred per cent of donations will support our ongoing Covid-19 response efforts delivering PPE to medical professionals, and frontline and essential workers, as well as supporting grassroots organisations. We will forever be inspired by the courage of our first responders, whose unwavering strength and resilience is a light of hope for us all.”

Gurung went on to note that he is investigating a “safe plan to scale production of civilian face masks” with the goal to reinvigorate the Garment District.

Other fashion designers, including Christian Siriano and Brandon Maxwell, have also been making masks for key workers, while executives at major conglomerates such as Kering and Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have unveiled plans to supply millions of masks to residents in France.

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LVMH Prize to be shared among all eight finalists

The 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Designers is to be shared among all eight finalists.Last month, organisers of the prestigious fashion contest announced that Peter Do, Supriya Lele, Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Nicholas Daley,…

The 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Designers is to be shared among all eight finalists.

Last month, organisers of the prestigious fashion contest announced that Peter Do, Supriya Lele, Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Nicholas Daley, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, and Sindiso Khumalo were the designers left in the running for the award.

However, in light of the coronavirus crisis sweeping the world, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have decided to cancel the final, originally scheduled for 5 June, and instead will name all of the finalists as winners. The $340,000 (£260,000) award will be distributed equally among the designers.

In addition, Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, has unveiled plans to set up a fund in aid of young fashion designers, which will be supplemented by the 2020 Karl Lagerfeld Prize allocation. Designers and brands awarded the LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers and the Karl Lagerfeld Prize over the six previous editions will be eligible to apply for support.

“Since its launch, the LVMH Prize has promoted and nurtured young talent. Each year, it places the spotlight on young designers from all over the world and supports the development of their companies,” said Arnault. “In this challenging context, this fund in aid of young fashion designers highlights the main mission of the LVMH Prize by supporting our former winners.”

Details of the programme will be confirmed at a later date.

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Louis Vuitton making face masks and hospital gowns amid coronavirus crisis

Louis Vuitton has reopened one of its ateliers to begin making face masks and hospital gowns amid the coronavirus crisis.In light of the Covid-19 pandemic around the world, bosses at the French luxury fashion house have announced that they have altered…

Louis Vuitton has reopened one of its ateliers to begin making face masks and hospital gowns amid the coronavirus crisis.

In light of the Covid-19 pandemic around the world, bosses at the French luxury fashion house have announced that they have altered workshops so they can now manufacture personal protective equipment (PPE) for hospitals and frontline workers.

“Louis Vuitton announces the production of thousands of hospital gowns to be donated to frontline medical staff within the Parisian hospital network AP-HP,” a brand spokesperson commented, referring to Assistance Publique – Hopitaux de Paris hospital trust. “These gowns will be created by volunteers at the Maison’s headquarters for six Parisian hospitals in urgent need of protective gear. Thank you to everyone who is doing their part to fight this global pandemic.”

In addition, Louis Vuitton has begun producing non-medical masks approved by authorities at six of its workshops. Around 300 leather goods artisans are working to meet a government request for alternative non-medical barrier masks to help stop the spread of the virus.

“In partnership with the Mode Grande Ouest textile network, this initiative will donate the much-needed protective gear to frontline healthcare workers. Thank you to the hundreds of artisans who have volunteered to create these masks, as well as everyone doing their part to fight this global pandemic,” they added.

In addition, other houses within the Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) conglomerate are also undertaking actions to help aid health workers.

The perfumes and cosmetics production sites of Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy have been retooled so they can make large quantities of hand sanitiser gel for hospitals, while volunteer staff at the Dior workshop in Redon, Brittany are making non-surgical face masks.

Europe is now the epicentre of the pandemic, with France among the most affected nations – with approximately 94,000 active cases and 14,900 deaths.

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Prabal Gurung to begin manufacturing supplies for medical workers

Prabal Gurung has pledged to begin making medical supplies amid the coronavirus crisis.In light of the escalating Covid-19 pandemic around the world, the Nepalese-American designer took to Instagram on Monday to announce that he is preparing his worksh…

Prabal Gurung has pledged to begin making medical supplies amid the coronavirus crisis.

In light of the escalating Covid-19 pandemic around the world, the Nepalese-American designer took to Instagram on Monday to announce that he is preparing his workshop and staff members to start manufacturing personal protective equipment (PPE).

Responding to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s call for fashion industry leaders to help make medical masks last week, Gurung wants to do all he possibly can to help.

“The PG team has been working tirelessly over the course of the last week to finalise an actionable plan to manufacture PPE for medical workers and first responders who are on the front lines of the Covid-19 crisis,” he wrote. “As a brand that produces over 90 per cent of our collections in NY, our goal is not only to fill the void of critical PPE, but to mobilise our domestic partners, revitalising U.S. producers and suppliers. While we are eager to share our progress with you all, the coronavirus crisis is ever evolving, and as new information is revealed, so are new FDA and state regulations. In this moment, credible and validated information is of the utmost importance for the advancement of all Covid-19 relief efforts.”

Gurung went on to note that he is in contact with Cuomo’s team and employees at local hospitals to figure out exactly what supplies are required.

“We are currently working in partnership with @nygovcuomo office & local hospitals to secure clearance to produce, and ensure the viability of our output,” the 40-year-old added.

Other fashion designers, including Christian Siriano and Brandon Maxwell, are also looking to make medical masks for hospital workers, while executives at major conglomerates such as Kering and Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have unveiled plans to supply millions of masks to workers in France.

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Saint Laurent and Balenciaga workshops to begin making medical masks

Employees at Saint Laurent and Balenciaga’s workshops will soon begin making medical masks.In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis around the world, bosses at Kering, the parent company of the luxury fashion houses, announced on Sunday that they …

Employees at Saint Laurent and Balenciaga’s workshops will soon begin making medical masks.

In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis around the world, bosses at Kering, the parent company of the luxury fashion houses, announced on Sunday that they are preparing to transform textile plants so they can start manufacturing surgical masks for hospitals in order to help support local health authorities.

“The French workshops of Kering’s Houses Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent are preparing to manufacture masks while complying with the strictest health protection measures for their staff members, with production getting underway as soon as the manufacturing process and materials have been approved by the relevant authorities,” a spokesperson said in a statement.

Leaders at Kering, the conglomerate helmed by Francois-Henri Pinault, have already provided the French health service with three million masks, following on from contributions made to China and Italy in recent weeks.

They are also making a financial donation to the Institut Pasteur in Paris to aid scientists in researching the Covid-19 pandemic.

Meanwhile, bosses at Kering’s main competitor Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have also pledged to supply millions of surgical masks to workers in France.

“By virtue of its global distribution network, LVMH has managed to secure an order with a Chinese industrial supplier for a delivery of 10 million masks in France in the coming days (seven million surgical masks and three million FFP2 masks). The order will be repeated for at least four weeks in similar quantities (i.e. approximately 40 million masks),” a spokesperson commented.

Last week, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault instructed the staff at LVMH Perfumes & Cosmetics, including those who make products for Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy, to prepare sites to begin making “substantial quantities” of hydroalcoholic gel.

The gel will be delivered free of charge to French health authorities and those working at Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, a network of teaching hospitals that treats more than eight million patients per year.

At present, there have been over 351,000 reported coronavirus cases around the world, with 15,000 deaths. China, Italy, Spain, France, Germany, Iran, and the U.S. remain the worst affected nations.

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LVMH to make hand sanitiser for hospitals amid coronavirus crisis

Employees at perfume factories owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) are to begin manufacturing hand sanitiser for hospitals.In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis in France and around the world, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault has in…

Employees at perfume factories owned by Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) are to begin manufacturing hand sanitiser for hospitals.

In light of the escalating coronavirus crisis in France and around the world, LVMH chief executive Bernard Arnault has instructed bosses at LVMH Perfumes & Cosmetics, including those who make products for Christian Dior, Guerlain, and Givenchy, to prepare sites to begin making “substantial quantities” of hydroalcoholic gel.

The gel will be delivered free of charge to French health authorities and those working at Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, a network of teaching hospitals that treats more than eight million patients per year.

“Through this initiative, LVMH intends to help address the risk of a lack of product in France and enable a greater number of people to continue to take the right action to protect themselves from the spread of the virus,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “LVMH will continue to honour this commitment for as long as necessary, in connection with the French health authorities.”

More than 170,000 people have been affected in 158 countries since the Covid-19 outbreak began in Wuhan, China back in December. Italy, Spain, and some parts of the U.S. have gone into lockdown to contain the spread of the virus, as more than 6,600 people have died.

In France, leaders have introduced sweeping restrictions across the nation, with cafes, restaurants, cinemas, and many non-essential stores now closed, while pharmacies have restricted customers to one bottle of sanitiser per person.

There has been over 5,400 coronavirus cases reported in the country, with 127 deaths.

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Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh join 2020 LVMH Prize jury

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers …

Stella McCartney and Virgil Abloh are to help judge the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers competition.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designers competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Tuesday, organisers announced that this year’s winner will be announced at an event held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris on 5 June, with McCartney and Louis Vuitton menswear designer Abloh among the panel.

Singer Rihanna, who launched her Fenty clothing label in partnership with the luxury conglomerate last year, will also be on the jury.

“For this seventh edition, I am delighted to announce the arrival of Virgil Abloh, former Prize finalist, Robyn Rihanna Fenty, and Stella McCartney in the jury of the LVMH Prize,” said Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, in a statement. “They will be joining our prestigious panel which includes: Jonathan Anderson, Kris Van Assche, Nicolas Ghesquiere, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Marc Jacobs, Clare Waight Keller as well as Sidney Toledano, Jean-Paul Claverie and I. I wish to thank them for their involvement and their support to young creation. The prize is an incredible opportunity for these young designers to be appraised by them and to enjoy their advice.”

Those in the running for the 2020 LVMH Prize include New York-based designer Peter Do, British-Indian designer Supriya Lele, British menswear designer Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, French menswear designer Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, London-based menswear designer Nicholas Daley, South African womenswear designer Sindiso Khumalo, and Japanese womenswear designer Tomotaka Koizumi of Tomo Koizumi.

The winner will take home $340,000 (£260,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months.

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Peter Do and Supriya Lele among 2020 LVMH Prize finalists

Peter Do and Supriya Lele are among the finalists for the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Designers.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designer competition open to…

Peter Do and Supriya Lele are among the finalists for the 2020 LVMH Prize for Young Designers.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the Young Fashion Designer competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

On Tuesday, organisers announced the final group of eight designers, with New York-based Do and British-Indian designer Lele in the running.

Other finalists include British menswear designer Priya Ahluwalia of Ahluwalia, French menswear designer Charaf Tajer of Casablanca, Emma Chopova and Laura Lowena of womenswear brand Chopova Lowena, London-based menswear designer Nicholas Daley, South African womenswear designer Sindiso Khumalo, and Japanese womenswear designer Tomotaka Koizumi of Tomo Koizumi.

Praising the finalists, Delphine Arnault, executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, said she was pleased to see so much diversity within the group.

“This year, once more, the semi-finalists impressed us with their creativity and their commitment to creating clothes that are respectful of the environment,” she commented. “I would like to congratulate all of them! I would also like to thank the committee of experts for their involvement in the semi-final and for the time they devoted to each designer, as well as the members of the jury who came to meet them. It was very difficult to decide between them!”

The winner of the LVMH Prize for Young Designers, who will take home $340,000 (£260,000) and receive support from executives at the company for 12 months, will be announced at an event on 5 June.

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LVMH reaches deal to buy Tiffany & Co. for $16.2 billion

Executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have made a deal to buy Tiffany & Co. for $16.2 billion (£12.5 billion).Back in October, leaders at the world’s biggest high-end goods conglomerate, headed by French billionaire Bernard Arnault, announc…

Executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have made a deal to buy Tiffany & Co. for $16.2 billion (£12.5 billion).

Back in October, leaders at the world’s biggest high-end goods conglomerate, headed by French billionaire Bernard Arnault, announced they had approached bosses at the U.S. jewellery brand with a possible takeover bid.

But after a month of talks, representatives announced on Monday that the companies had entered into an agreement where LVMH will acquire Tiffany for $135 (£104) per share in cash, with the equity value of the transaction equating to $16.2 billion.

“We are delighted to have the opportunity to welcome Tiffany, a company with an unparalleled heritage and unique position in the global jewellery world, to the LVMH family,” Arnault, chairman and chief executive officer of LVMH, commented. “We have an immense respect and admiration for Tiffany and intend to develop this jewel with the same dedication and commitment that we have applied to each and every one of our maisons. We will be proud to have Tiffany sit alongside our iconic brands and look forward to ensuring that Tiffany continues to thrive for centuries to come.”

In addition to owning Louis Vuitton, LVMH is the parent company of watch and jewellery brands including Bulgari, Chaumet, Hublot, TAG Heuer, and Zenith.

Roger N. Farah, chairman of the board of directors of Tiffany, stated that the deal is expected to close in mid-2020. The transaction is subject to closing conditions, including approval from Tiffany’s shareholders and the receipt of regulatory approvals.

“Following a strategic review that included a thoughtful internal process and expert external advice, the board has concluded that this transaction with LVMH provides an exciting path forward with a group that appreciates and will invest in Tiffany’s unique assets and strong human capital, while delivering a compelling price with value certainty to our shareholders,” he said.

Founded in 1837 by Charles Lewis Tiffany, Tiffany has since become synonymous with timeless design and the iconic Tiffany Blue boxes.

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Thebe Magugu wins 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers

Thebe Magugu has been crowned the winner of the 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers.Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the competition open to designers from around th…

Thebe Magugu has been crowned the winner of the 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers.

Every year since 2013, executives at Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH) have held the prestigious contest, with the competition open to designers from around the world who have produced at least two collections and who are under 40.

Following an intense round of interviews and challenges, rising South African designer Magugu was bestowed with the top honour by actress Alicia Vikander at a ceremony held at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris on Wednesday afternoon.

“I am delighted that, for the first time, an African candidate has won the Prize, all the more so since Thebe Magugu, aged 26, is the youngest designer of the 2019 selection,” Delphine Arnault, head of the competition and executive vice president of Louis Vuitton, said of Magugu in a statement. “His creative work appropriates the codes of menswear and womenswear, of the traditional and the experimental, playing with volumes and traditional South African know-how.”

Magugu will take home $338,000 (£275,000) and receive mentoring from executives at the company for 12 months. Israeli designer Hed Mayner, 33, was selected as runner-up and received the 2019 Karl Lagerfeld Prize. He will also enjoy a one-year mentorship programme and $165,000 (£135,000).

“The jury was also seduced by Hed Mayner’s contemporary vision. His collections question the notion of gender through an aesthetic that blends soft lines and structure, simplicity and luxury,” added Arnault.

More than 1,700 candidates applied for the 2019 LVMH Prize for Young Fashion Designers, with the six other finalists including Japanese designer Kunihiko Morinaga of Anrealage, American fashion star Spencer Phipps, Stefan Cooke and Jake Burt of British label Stefan Cooke, and Nigerian designer Kenneth Izedonmwen of Kenneth Ize.

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